What spider?
December 19, 2018 6:20 PM   Subscribe

What species of salticid is this?

I saw him (we're going with "him") in the office the other day and snapped a photo with my work camera. His name is Edwin and he is our official Office Spider. We live in New England. What species is Edwin?
posted by Anticipation Of A New Lover's Arrival, The to Science & Nature (11 answers total) 6 users marked this as a favorite
 
Edwin is maybe 3mm across. Sorry, forgot to say.
posted by Anticipation Of A New Lover's Arrival, The at 6:21 PM on December 19, 2018


Oh hi, friend. Nice photo! Here’s an overview of NA salticids, focus on New England Spp.

Common jumping spiders discussed here.

While your photo gives us a lovely look at the eyes, palps are obscured and abdomen is invisivble, so that limits information on some key characteristics. Keep in mind that color is not especially informative here, unlike e.g. North American birds. These little spiders can come in a zillions color patterns, all within the same species.

If you have more photos or a good memory, see pictorial key here.

Species ID is tough for this large family with many members in the northeast USA. If pressed I would learn towards A. canosa .
posted by SaltySalticid at 6:46 PM on December 19, 2018 [19 favorites]


I think I have a photo on my work laptop taken from a higher angle where you can see more abdomen. I will try to find it tomorrow!
posted by Anticipation Of A New Lover's Arrival, The at 6:50 PM on December 19, 2018


How do we feel about Anasaitis sp.?
posted by Anticipation Of A New Lover's Arrival, The at 6:54 PM on December 19, 2018


Edwin is adorable as heck.
posted by ejs at 7:33 PM on December 19, 2018 [6 favorites]


What a good spider you have!
posted by ancient star at 7:36 PM on December 19, 2018


Maybe this fella?
posted by vrakatar at 7:59 PM on December 19, 2018 [1 favorite]


I never thought about how bugs must get lint stuck to their spiky bits all the time. Like getting loo roll stuck to your loafer
posted by pseudostrabismus at 12:44 AM on December 20, 2018 [2 favorites]


get lint stuck to their spiky bits all the time.

Yep, and they also spend a lot of time grooming to deal with it. Anecdotally salticids seem to groom much the time they aren’t actively hunting. But for more studied insect like bees, you can find quantitative analysis describing what percent of time a bee spends grooming her sister’s wing vs her back, etc.
posted by SaltySalticid at 4:56 AM on December 20, 2018 [12 favorites]


🕷️I'm delighted the eponymous SaltySalticid showed up to answer this question first, like I was hoping when I clicked through.
posted by Pandora Kouti at 7:27 AM on December 20, 2018 [15 favorites]


He looks a lot like Lucas.
posted by NoraCharles at 12:59 PM on December 20, 2018 [1 favorite]


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