What is a long hot pepper?
May 30, 2016 10:31 AM   Subscribe

In the Northeast US around Philly (I don't know about anywhere else) the grocery stores sell peppers called only "long hots" or "Italian long hots." They are pretty great for all kinds of purposes. They aren't actually really hot by my standards, but they are tasty, cheap, easy to use, and do have a bit of heat if you don't clean out the seeds. I'd like to grow some in the garden this year, but from the googling I've done people seem to be unclear about what pepper exactly this is.

It seems somewhat of a genericized name. Does anybody know what exactly I should buy if I want to grow these? Or, do you know of a close substitute that has the same characteristics at least? Image of the peppers I buy from the store.
posted by Drinky Die to Food & Drink (16 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
From here, it looks like it could be a few different ones, but Basque Fryer looks closest.

For something that meets your criteria and may be easier to find try Anaheim or hot banana.
posted by sparklemotion at 10:39 AM on May 30, 2016 [1 favorite]


I think this looks similar to a gentleman Jim, which is a variety of green chile grown in the southwest and related to the Anaheim.

link
posted by answergrape at 10:47 AM on May 30, 2016


Look for varieties of New Mexico chile for seeds and plants. They need hot, dry climates for full flavor.
posted by answergrape at 10:48 AM on May 30, 2016


Anaheim would be a good, easily found, go-to. Easy to grow and relatively versatile.
posted by Thorzdad at 10:50 AM on May 30, 2016


Could it be a Lombardo pepper?

And this is a bit of a sideways answer, but I've had pretty good luck just planting the seeds from peppers I buy in the store.
posted by ernielundquist at 11:05 AM on May 30, 2016 [3 favorites]


The basque fryer and lombardo definitely look on point based on image and description. I will look into both of those more. But still it seems weird to me that these things are being shipped to stores all around me and nobody can definitively tell me what the heck they are. Maybe I should have called the stores first and see where they lead me. :P
posted by Drinky Die at 11:10 AM on May 30, 2016


Why can't the name be exactly that: Italian Long Hots?
posted by Stewriffic at 11:12 AM on May 30, 2016 [5 favorites]


Cause here are some seeds.
posted by Stewriffic at 11:16 AM on May 30, 2016 [3 favorites]


I think Stewriffic is right, I've worked the chile roaster at a farmer's market one long, hot Arizona summer. I can definitely tell you the long hots aren't related to Anaheims, Hatch chiles, or anything in the thick-walled green chile category. Here's an Italian Sweet Roaster that's probably a mild variety of Italian Long Hot Stewriffic posted.
http://www.seedman.com/pepper.htm
posted by TungstenChef at 11:26 AM on May 30, 2016


There are a few peppers you could substitute in the same dish. Shishitos are my favorite, you can roast or pan fry them and they pack a huge flavor punch. Other thin-walled peppers that are somewhat hot are Padrons or Cubanelles.
posted by TungstenChef at 11:30 AM on May 30, 2016


But still it seems weird to me that these things are being shipped to stores all around me and nobody can definitively tell me what the heck they are.

Have you tried asking at garden centers or a county extension service in your area?

People who live near you and are in the business of knowing about plants might have the combination of knowledge that you need.
posted by sparklemotion at 12:42 PM on May 30, 2016 [1 favorite]


Philly gardener and eater of long hot here. You can find the seeds and plants at a lot of garden centers under the name pepperoncini.
posted by joyceanmachine at 12:48 PM on May 30, 2016 [2 favorites]


Is there any reason you wouldn't just use the seeds from the peppers from the supermarket?
posted by glitter at 2:05 PM on May 30, 2016 [1 favorite]


... just use the seeds from the peppers from the supermarket?

It's probably worth a try, but it they're a hybrid, as many, many commercial crops are, the seed is unlikely to come true. You'd get a variety of features from the parent species.
posted by Bruce H. at 2:30 PM on May 30, 2016 [2 favorites]


Very good question. This page, on Italian Long Hot Peppers, may help. Also take a look at these seeds. Please post back if you find the seeds you're looking for!
posted by MonkeyToes at 4:00 PM on May 30, 2016


Or maybe Mesilla Hybrids?
posted by MonkeyToes at 4:16 PM on May 30, 2016


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