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How do I thank a recruiter who didn't end up placing me?
September 25, 2012 1:28 PM   Subscribe

I have been using a professional recruiter. If I end up taking a position that I didn't find through them, what the best way to thank/compensate them for their effort?

Possibly relevant details:

I found the job I'm (probably) taking totally independently.

I'm a professional. The interviews the recruiter got me were with great firms. The recruiters were excellent communicators throughout the whole process.

I will, of course, recommend them to anyone in need of their services, but don't know if I need to send a gift or some other token.
posted by i am a sock puppeteer to Work & Money (9 answers total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
You've pretty much summed it up right here.

Dear Recruiter,

I wanted to let you know that I've been offered and have accepted a position in my desired field. Thank you so much for the time you spent with me in helping me land a new position. I was impressed with how well you communicated with me during the process and with the high caliber of firms that you deal with. I'd love to pass your information along to some of my colleagues should they ever need to use your services. Do keep in touch.

Sincerely,

Socky.

Recruiters are compensated by finding folks to fill positions. If you didn't get the job, someone else she recommended may have. Not to worry. In the recruiting game it's all about networking, and you never know, she may find you Job Charming some time in the future. Or she may find your friend Job Charming, etc.
posted by Ruthless Bunny at 1:32 PM on September 25, 2012 [4 favorites]


Absolutely no need for a gift. Don't worry - depending on the field these guys get as much as 50% of your first year salary - money that otherwise might have gone to you.
A nice thank you note is a good idea as Ruthless Bunny says
posted by Marzipan at 1:44 PM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


Don't worry - depending on the field these guys get as much as 50% of your first year salary - money that otherwise might have gone to you.

Not really. Companies don't take that money out of your paycheck, and odds are that the recruiter sold you to them at a certain price point that was higher than you would have negotiated for yourself (I say this based on personal experience and the fact that most people aren't very good at salary negotiation).

Ruthless Bunny's letter is good, but I would add the company where you've accepted the job. The recruiter will probably try to find out anyway, if only to add it to their file of Places They Know People, and there's really no downside to your telling them, if you didn't go behind their backs. Don't worry about a gift -- recruiters understand that you're going to be looking for work as well as waiting for them to call.
posted by Etrigan at 2:00 PM on September 25, 2012


Nice thank you note. And yes, let them know where to get ahold of you in the future, and offer to do what you can to assist them in future searches. One never knows; you may need their services again, either to hire someone for your team, or to shop yourself around again. Keep the bridges well maintained.

odds are that the recruiter sold you to them at a certain price point that was higher than you would have negotiated for yourself

Totally true.
posted by Miko at 2:10 PM on September 25, 2012


They probably don't expect it, but the universal good-karma acknowledgement when you end up trading away from an agent who works hard for you is a nice bottle of wine.
posted by MattD at 2:13 PM on September 25, 2012


Also consider they're web presence. Linkedin recommendations would no doubt also be appreciated.
posted by Carillon at 2:32 PM on September 25, 2012


Thank you email/card and connecting with them on LinkedIn is good. If they got you interviews then they're worth keeping in touch with for the next time you're looking.
posted by Happy Dave at 2:36 PM on September 25, 2012


Recruiter here. I have received gifts from candidates only twice in 20+ years. Notes like what Ruthless Bunny suggests are still uncommon enough that sending one will put you WAY ahead of the pack. LinkedIn recommendations are also good. Referrals are the lifeblood of our business. Pass the recruiter's name along liberally.

As for this ...

depending on the field these guys get as much as 50% of your first year salary

Total bullshit. Don't repeat it.

money that otherwise might have gone to you

Ditto. Companies have budgets to pay recruiters' fees. And if you're the person they really want, they don't mind paying.

Thanks for taking a stand for integrity!
posted by John Borrowman at 2:54 PM on September 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


Recruiters don't work for you, they work the employers. You don't need to thank them, because they weren't working for you.

Just let them know, to be considerate: "Dear so-and-so, It was a pleasure working with you, but i wanted to let you know that i've found a position elsewhere, and i'm not longer available for placement. Cheers, S. Puppeteer".
posted by Kololo at 3:42 PM on September 25, 2012


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