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What songs have a military sounding snare drum in the background
May 24, 2010 6:52 AM   Subscribe

What songs start with a snare drum (like a military parade) or have a snare throughout the song?

My mom has done an arrangement of a hymn that has a military sounding snare drum in the background. She's worried that people will think she's copying someone's work and may get sued for it. I've assured her that this has been done numerous times and it's fine. But I can't think of any specific songs to play for her to prove it. Any ideas? Links would be great!

Thanks
posted by birchhook to Media & Arts (35 answers total) 6 users marked this as a favorite
 
Sunday Bloody Sunday.
posted by bondcliff at 6:55 AM on May 24, 2010


Mercenary by the Go-Go's
posted by Lucinda at 6:56 AM on May 24, 2010


Tears for Fears--Break It Down Again
posted by greta simone at 6:58 AM on May 24, 2010


The Beatles - "All You Need is Love"
Sting "All This Time"
posted by emelenjr at 7:07 AM on May 24, 2010


Fifty Ways to Leave your Lover...not exactly military but it's what came to mind.
posted by cabingirl at 7:08 AM on May 24, 2010


Major Lazer "Pon de floor"
posted by derbs at 7:08 AM on May 24, 2010


The Ballad of the Green Berets, if that's not too obvious.
posted by Aquaman at 7:18 AM on May 24, 2010


"Fifty Ways" was the first to come to my mind as well, but there are plenty. I love songs with a good martial snare in the percussion.
posted by Faint of Butt at 7:19 AM on May 24, 2010


Probably because the World Cup (soccer) is starting soon I thought of Vindaloo.
posted by selton at 7:24 AM on May 24, 2010


Also by Paul Simon: The Obvious Child
posted by anthom at 7:24 AM on May 24, 2010


I'm pretty sure that's a snare drum in Ravel's Bolero.
posted by jingzuo at 7:25 AM on May 24, 2010 [1 favorite]


Cherub Rock by the Smashing Pumpkins starts with a snare drum.
posted by dephlogisticated at 7:29 AM on May 24, 2010


Johnny Was - Stiff Little Fingers (not a great version sorry)
posted by Fiery Jack at 7:29 AM on May 24, 2010


The Big Parade - 10,000 Maniacs
posted by WhackyparseThis at 7:37 AM on May 24, 2010


Anything ever played by a police or fire department marching band

Also,BOB by Outkast
posted by chrisulonic at 7:42 AM on May 24, 2010


The Tide is High by Blondie, I think.
posted by Melismata at 7:43 AM on May 24, 2010


Pet Shop Boys' Se a Vida E
posted by Work to Live at 7:47 AM on May 24, 2010


They Saved Hitler's Cock - Angry Samoans
posted by cazoo at 8:17 AM on May 24, 2010


The Yellow Rose of Texas and The Battle of New Orleans both have a snare drum playing throughout.
posted by sagwalla at 8:27 AM on May 24, 2010


Rainy Day Women no 12 & 35, by Bob Dylan.
posted by Dr Dracator at 8:37 AM on May 24, 2010


My Chemical Romance's Welcome to the Black Parade

Also, I'm not sure you could be sued for using a similar drum rhythm -- and a common one nonetheless. At least I've never heard of it.
posted by Kippersoft at 8:37 AM on May 24, 2010


Love March by Paul Butterfield off The Electra Years.
posted by Sculthorpe at 8:50 AM on May 24, 2010


Nik Kershaw's The Riddle is the song I hear in my head when reading your description. Fits the bill, I think.
posted by yellowcandy at 9:05 AM on May 24, 2010


Seriously, she's worrying over nothing. Every Sousa march ever written, for example, has a military-sounding snare in the background. Every piece of classical music with the word "War" in the title has this effect somewhere.

If Andrew Lloyd Webber is still standing, she'll be fine.
posted by range at 9:09 AM on May 24, 2010


Lauryn Hill, To Zion
posted by nebulawindphone at 9:32 AM on May 24, 2010


I came in to say "50 Ways," too, but then it occurred to me that Jacob's Ladder by Rush also fits.
posted by crLLC at 10:34 AM on May 24, 2010


She's worried that people will think she's copying someone's work and may get sued for it.

Came in to suggest Bolero, but since it's already been mentioned, let me just say that she can't get sued for using a snare drum in this way. In music, many things are un-copywritable, like chord changes - and this snare technique would fall into that category (unless it's some wild, anomalous oddity). Melodies can even be copied (I think) up through the 7th note.

Tell her not to worry.
posted by Lutoslawski at 10:44 AM on May 24, 2010


Maybe not the genre you're looking for but "Lose My Breath" by Destiny's Child.
posted by ista at 11:01 AM on May 24, 2010


Metallica - Struggle Within
The Melvins - The Water Glass
posted by goalie_dave at 12:40 PM on May 24, 2010


Melodies can even be copied (I think) up through the 7th note.

Interesting. Do you have a reference for that?
posted by monospace at 1:24 PM on May 24, 2010


The outro of Clapton's "She's Waiting" has a military drum and fife sound.
posted by JJtheJetPlane at 2:20 PM on May 24, 2010


the drummer in my band is very familiar with copyright issues. he says that drumbeats or drum patterns cannot be copyrighted. so you should be safe no matter what.
posted by g.i.r. at 2:23 PM on May 24, 2010


Broken Hearts For You And Me – Trio
posted by qwip at 2:44 PM on May 24, 2010


Melodies can even be copied (I think) up through the 7th note.

Interesting. Do you have a reference for that?

There's this thread, but it isn't very helpful. The anecdote I was going to share is the one PinkSuperhero mentions at the beginning of the thread.

After doing more research on it, I really can't find any more evidence. Most of what I find speaks more to the intent of the artist and the context, etc. I would imagine there are more specifics somewhere - in the vein of "you can copyright melodies but not changes or rhythms" (perhaps this is purely because of the mathematics of the whole thing) - but I can't find any. Sorry. So it's quite possible that the "8 note" thing is purely urban myth.
posted by Lutoslawski at 3:51 PM on May 24, 2010


THANK YOU! for all your answers. Very helpful.

I marked my favorites because Mercenary was the first one with exactly the drum beat I was looking for, Ravel's Bolero because it's the oldest, Bob Dylan's Rainy Day Woman because it's Bob Dylan, and the copyright info for alleviating that concern.
posted by birchhook at 4:22 PM on May 24, 2010


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