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What's with Ticketmaster tickets?
May 11, 2010 7:04 AM   Subscribe

Please explain Ticketmaster ticket policies for me, re:I have a ticket to sell.

It's been a long, long time since I've purchased tickets to a concert, so please bear with me...

So, my son wanted a ticket to an upcoming concert. Tickets, of course, are only available through Ticketmaster. My son does not have a credit card, so, obliging Dad goes online and buys son a ticket. Not an e-ticket. A hard ticket mailed to me. Now, here's my flurry of questions...

1. I see that the tickets have my name all over them. I've heard all sorts of odd stories about Ticketmaster tickets since I bought this ticket. To wit...When he arrives at the concert, will my son have to provide ID with a name that matches the name on the ticket? His ID has the same address as mine. Would that do, if they check/match ID?

2. If son decided he can't go to the concert, what are my options for selling the thing? Ticketmaster seems to imply that the only way to sell a ticket is through their own re-selling service. Of course, there's a fee involved, but I'm okay with that if that's the way we have to go. But, if I can unload the ticket on Craigslist, I'd rather go that route. But, the whole "my name on the ticket" question above comes into play, in my mind. If my name is on the ticket, can the person I sell it to use it?

I can't find anything in the fine-print on the ticket or accompanying papers that addresses any of this. I know I'm probably beanplating this, but Ticketmaster just does that to me.

Anyway, if someone could clear all this up for me, I'd really appreciate it.
posted by Thorzdad to Grab Bag (11 answers total)
 
Laws on ticket resale vary by state. A brief Google search seems to indicate that ticket scalping by a private property is not illegal in Indiana, and that you can charge over face value if you want. You may be prohibited from selling it at the venue.

I haven't used TicketMaster's resale service, but I have used StubHub a couple times with no problems as both buyer and seller. These were both events in New York, however, so I don't know if StubHub can operate in IN.

If your son has an actual hard copy ticket, he will likely not need an ID. If he were picking up the ticket at the will call window, you would most likely need to be there with the credit card used to purchase the ticket.
posted by mkb at 7:13 AM on May 11, 2010


He will not have to provide ID at the venue unless it's some sort of 18+ show. If he decides he doesn't want to go, your best bet for offloading the ticket is probably your local Craigslist. Just don't try to scalp.
posted by scarykarrey at 7:14 AM on May 11, 2010


I think if he has the ticket in hand and not at will call, he will not have to provide ID.
posted by Dick Laurent is Dead at 7:14 AM on May 11, 2010


TicketMaster will, for certain events, let you resell tickets right through itself (TicketExchange). Regulatory capture at its finest.
posted by adipocere at 7:32 AM on May 11, 2010 [1 favorite]


For the most part, you can re-sell tickets anywhere, as long as you sell them at or below face value (selling above face value is illegal -- not that it doesn't happen all the time, but it is). I recently couldn't go to a show I had tickets for, and live nation wouldn't let me exchange them, but actually told me to go to the venue and sell them in front of the ticket office for face value.
posted by brainmouse at 8:47 AM on May 11, 2010


selling above face value is illegal

where?

this type of broad statement is untrue and unhelpful. scalping laws are extremely complicated and vary by state and sometimes by city. in many localities it is perfectly legal to resell tickets for as much money as you can get.
posted by peep at 9:13 AM on May 11, 2010


He will not have to provide ID at the venue unless it's some sort of 18+ show.

I don't think this is always true. It depends on the concert. For example, there was a Miley Cyrus tour last year that required you to show ID/credit card with a ticket in order to combat scalping. However, I think ticket buyers were told this upon buying the ticket which it sounds like you weren't. If it's just a local show at a club, it will be fine. You can always call the venue to check.
posted by bluefly at 9:35 AM on May 11, 2010


http://muncie.craigslist.org/tix/
posted by spatula at 10:12 AM on May 11, 2010


Just going to 2nd peep's comment since brainmouse has received best answer -- selling above face value is legal in many jurisdictions. Including, for instance, all of New York State (as of about three years ago). ianal.
posted by thejoshu at 2:27 PM on May 11, 2010


I'm not sure what the scalping laws are here in Indiana, but I have no desire to test those waters, anyway. I just want to get most of my money back.

~ there was a Miley Cyrus tour last year that required you to show ID/credit card with a ticket in order to combat scalping. However, I think ticket buyers were told this upon buying the ticket which it sounds like you weren't. If it's just a local show at a club, it will be fine. You can always call the venue to check.

It's this confusion, really, that prompted this whole post. I have no idea what's allowed. The concert is at an area music arena, so it's a pretty big venue. As I said in my post, Ticketmaster is pretty vague about whether you can sell these things on the open market. Their website certainly implies that you have to use their TicketExchange system, but doesn't come outright and say it's your only option. Having my name and address printed all over the ticket certainly reinforces the impression that I'm the only authorized user of the ticket.
posted by Thorzdad at 3:47 AM on May 12, 2010


It's this confusion, really, that prompted this whole post. I have no idea what's allowed. The concert is at an area music arena

Check with the venue to see what their entry policy will be for this particular event. Events that have a hard-and-fast requirement of matching the ticketholder to the purchaser or require an ID for entry are still the exception rather than the rule, and they generally go out of their way to make that policy known upfront.
posted by anazgnos at 4:17 PM on May 12, 2010


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