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An unwanted gallon of 2% milk
November 29, 2009 11:28 AM   Subscribe

What can I do with an unwanted gallon of 2% milk?

I meant to get skim milk, but I bought 2% by accident. I can't stand 2% milk; it tastes like cream to me. I couldn't find anyone else who likes 2% either, so I don't think I can give it away. I put a little bit in my coffee, which was OK, but I'm not going to use it up that way. Should I just throw it away, or is there something else I can do with it?

I could try cooking something (if it doesn't taste too much like 2% milk), but I'm even open to non-food uses, if any exist.
posted by k. to Food & Drink (39 answers total) 4 users marked this as a favorite
 
I always make rice pudding when I have too much milk. I'm not familiar with 2% though, so i can't tell you how what that would taste like.
posted by Solomon at 11:32 AM on November 29, 2009


There are thousands of recipes that use milk where you won't be able to taste it at all, including many breads. This is my favorite bread recipe and you can substitute milk for buttermilk.

Also: French toast.
posted by ORthey at 11:32 AM on November 29, 2009


You could make a fresh cheese. Ricotta is very easy. A gallon of milk will make about 4 cups of ricotta.
posted by jedicus at 11:33 AM on November 29, 2009


Pudding or mac-and-cheese come to mind first for me...

There's at least one cooking site (I'm thinking of Supercook, but maybe there are more) where you enter one or more ingredients you have on hand, and the search results show you recipes that contain those ingredients.
posted by lgandme0717 at 11:33 AM on November 29, 2009


Pour off a bit of it, then add cream or half-and-half to turn it back into normal milk.
posted by majick at 11:33 AM on November 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


Beat eggs, add milk to thin them out, make scrambled eggs.

Banana smoothie: put a few chopped frozen bananas and at least a cup of milk in a blender. Add honey and cinnamon. (Optional: nutmeg.) Blend and drink.
posted by Jaltcoh at 11:34 AM on November 29, 2009


Quiche is a great lunch food, and will use probably two cups of milk ...
posted by ClaudiaCenter at 11:34 AM on November 29, 2009


You could make paneer or ricotta. You would get less yield with 2% than with whole milk. The ricotta recipe says not to use low fat milk, but I don't think it's an issue if you then use the ricotta in something savory, like spinach-ricotta pie.
posted by cabingirl at 11:36 AM on November 29, 2009


Biscuits and Gravy. The gravy uses a ton of milk.
posted by TooFewShoes at 11:41 AM on November 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


Pudding! Lots of pudding!
posted by esmerelda_jenkins at 11:44 AM on November 29, 2009


French toast is an easy and great way to use it up. Also, it is a bit fiddly to do (you need a candy thermometer), but you can make yogurt out of it.
posted by gudrun at 11:46 AM on November 29, 2009


Awesome, awesome yogurt.
posted by sully75 at 11:49 AM on November 29, 2009 [3 favorites]


Pour off a bit of it, then add cream or half-and-half to turn it back into normal milk.

In case it wasn't clear, I don't like "normal" milk. My ideal milk would be as thin as water.
posted by k. at 11:50 AM on November 29, 2009


Potato soup? Oyster stew?
posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies at 11:54 AM on November 29, 2009


Or just give it to a family with kids.
posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies at 11:55 AM on November 29, 2009 [2 favorites]


In short: plenty of baked goods. The second link in the Related Links section on this page has a bunch of good recipes.
posted by filthy light thief at 11:57 AM on November 29, 2009


Continuation of previous thought: make lots of baked goods, and give those away, as baked goods are easier to give away than milk.
posted by filthy light thief at 11:58 AM on November 29, 2009


Sweet stuff:

1) Clafouti. You don't need to use cherries: try berries of any kind -- fresh or frozen -- sliced peaches, apples or pears.
2) Rice pudding.
3) Custard.
4) Instant pudding.

Savoury stuff:

1) Quiche. These can be frozen, so you don't have to commit yourself to quiche for the next week.
2) Breads.
3) White sauce for macaroni and cheese, to thicken soups and stews, or to serve with cooked veggies. Have plain or add shredded cheese.
posted by maudlin at 12:00 PM on November 29, 2009


Ice cream!
posted by mdonley at 12:13 PM on November 29, 2009


I'd make Greek yogurt.

Mmm. Greek yogurt.
posted by Space Kitty at 12:13 PM on November 29, 2009 [2 favorites]


looks like I'm not the only one.
posted by Space Kitty at 12:15 PM on November 29, 2009


Do you work in an office with a shared fridge? Coworkers love free food - I bet someone would put that in coffee if you brought it into work.
posted by cadge at 12:17 PM on November 29, 2009


I always make tapioca when I think I won't be using milk that I have... a big batch of tapioca is easy to make and is a terrific comfort food.
posted by devilsbrigade at 12:18 PM on November 29, 2009


Two weeks ago. Also previously.
posted by jocelmeow at 12:29 PM on November 29, 2009


Green Graffiti . Take a clump of moss and mix it in a blender with enough milk to create a paint like consistancy. Take the mixture and paint where ever you want moss to grow. Most recipes suggest buttermilk, but I bet 2% would work.
posted by JimmyJames at 12:56 PM on November 29, 2009 [3 favorites]


You can freeze the milk and then use it in coffee or tea, or for cooking--after thawing it won't taste good enough to drink, but it's fine for use as a hot-beverage creamer or in cooking.

Freeze it in ice-cube trays or in small freezer-safe plastic containers.

This is also a good thing to do with leftover wine (for cooking, that is--wine in coffee sounds disgusting).
posted by Sidhedevil at 1:06 PM on November 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


Can't you pour half in another carton, fill them both to the top with water, and then have two gallons of the barely-milk you like better? I think skim is 1% and 2% is ... well, about twice that. Sorry if this is too obvious.
posted by fritley at 1:31 PM on November 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


2% ricotta is fabulous and really good sweet or savory. You can google, but basically:
put the whole thing in your largest stock pot (boiling over milk happens fast and is a mess). Put it on the hottest temp just shy of scorching the bottom (variable, on my electric stove about 3/4 max). When the milk boils up take it off the heat and let it settle down (stirring abit). Add 1/4 c. white or other vinegar or lemon juice and stir until the curds separate. If they don't, add just a bit more acid. Strain through a sieve (I use a $2 nylon mesh paint strainer but you're unlikelly to have one on hand) or cheese cloth. Add about 1/4 tsp. salt and blend. Don't skip the salt even if you're going to use it sweet. I like the texture when it is put into a food processor or blended because it's smoother, but that is optional. 1 gallon =~ 2+ cups ricotta. Delicious! The whey can be used for cooking, steaming veg, baking, or dumped.
posted by kch at 1:40 PM on November 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


What about Dulce de Leche? It's pretty awesome, but I suggest you watch it like a hawk after 2 hours...
posted by WayOutWest at 2:51 PM on November 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


It says whole milk in the recipe above, but I've successfully used skim/2%
posted by WayOutWest at 2:52 PM on November 29, 2009


Can you return/exchange it?
posted by wongcorgi at 3:16 PM on November 29, 2009


Bread pudding or rice pudding (each of my recipes calls for 4 cups of milk). Or a nice milk bath, something I've always wanted to try.
posted by Lynsey at 3:27 PM on November 29, 2009


1:1 milk and sugar. Cook on a low simmer for about 40 minutes? It'll get very thick. Use it as a spread on toast, etc. Maybe add cinnamon.
posted by GilloD at 3:53 PM on November 29, 2009


I sometimes keep a pint of half and half in the freezer just in case I run out, and when it's thawed it always tastes like skimmed milk. So you could try freezing it.
posted by emilyw at 3:57 PM on November 29, 2009


Thanks for the suggestions; I'm not sure which I'll use yet.

I can't believe milk baths exist!
posted by k. at 4:49 PM on November 29, 2009


WHITE RUSSIANS
posted by mahoganyslide at 12:32 AM on November 30, 2009


"My ideal milk would be as thin as water."

Sorry for the misunderstanding. It's almost inconceivable to me that this would be true, but... okay!

What about another similarly common-sense approach? Whenever you would normally use your desired milk-like stuff -- your cereal bowl or reconstituting a soup can or whateve -- pour about half as much as you'd use from the milk carton, and fill the remaining volume with plain water? It might last a little longer than your typical container of milk would, but you wouldn't be going out of your way to deal with your mis-purchased milk.

You're buying by the gallon, so clearly you do use (what you call) milk in reasonable quantity, right? So just use the stuff you have and dilute it as you go. You might wind up chucking the last third of the gallon if you don't come up with a project to use a few extra cups of milk, but that's better than wasting the whole thing.
posted by majick at 6:19 AM on November 30, 2009


I tried freezing excess milk once and it thawed all separated and curdled. So, make paneer! Very similar process to ricotta, but you can cube it and use it in indian food (get a jar of one of those pre-made "simmer sauces", yummm).
posted by chowflap at 2:14 PM on November 30, 2009


Homemade Panneer! It takes some time, but little effort and totally worth it!
posted by kirol at 10:27 PM on December 2, 2009


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