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Avi to DIVX DVD?
December 9, 2008 7:51 PM   Subscribe

How do I burn .avi/.mpg/.flv/.divx etc. to a DVD-R for use on a Divx enabled stand alone DVD player?

Windows Vista home 32bit and Toshiba SD-V39K DVD/VCR combo (apparently Divx certified) similar to this model.
posted by Mitheral to Computers & Internet (10 answers total) 9 users marked this as a favorite
 
You're in Canada, so you're NTSC. Your DivX encoding parameters will be maximum 720x480 pixels frame size, 30 frames per second, 8Mbits/second peak bitrate. However, you seem interested in DVD encoding for DVD-R burning rather than DivX encoding, so standalone compatibility as certified by DivX would be irrelevant.

Have a look at this DVD encoding/authoring/burning guide, which uses all free software and works on Windows. Avidemux is versatile and will accept a wide variety of input formats, so as an initial encoding solution before authoring it's a pretty good system.

If you're instead interested in DivX encoding, you can use basically any DivX frontend but remember you will be constrained by the parameters mentioned in the first paragraph and you should additionally use no global motion compensation (GMC) and limit your encoding to two B-frames to be safe.
posted by Inspector.Gadget at 8:27 PM on December 9, 2008


Also, don't use ConvertXtoDVD or anything else by VSO Software; they violate other people's licensing terms and install a Windows system service that lends you no benefit. If you want that sort of all-in-one interface without all the suck, check out DVDFlick.
posted by Inspector.Gadget at 8:53 PM on December 9, 2008


If the AVI is already in Divx format, you just have to burn it to the DVD like any other file, and it will (probably) work. Your DVD player can likely also handle MPG format just fine. FLV will require conversion unless your player can also decode that.
posted by neckro23 at 9:17 PM on December 9, 2008


It sounds to me like you've already got the avi's, so you probably just need to burn a data disc. I used Nero when I had a PC, but I imagine there's free software out there. Vista can probably do it on it's own as well.
posted by backwards guitar at 9:23 PM on December 9, 2008


Mitheral, this thread over at the absolutely essential videohelp.com should have the info you're looking for.
posted by jtron at 9:23 PM on December 9, 2008 [1 favorite]


Inspector.Gadget writes "However, you seem interested in DVD encoding for DVD-R burning rather than DivX encoding, so standalone compatibility as certified by DivX would be irrelevant."

Isn't Divx encoding much smaller than DVD? I've got about a dozen hours of stuff I'd like to get on one disk which is why I was hoping to take advantage of my player's Divx capabilities.

neckro23 writes "If the AVI is already in Divx format, you just have to burn it to the DVD like any other file, and it will (probably) work."

How could I tell what format an AVi is in?

I've got Roxio to burn data DVDs.
posted by Mitheral at 5:38 PM on December 10, 2008


If you downloaded the avi files from a torrent site or something like that then they are probably DIVX or atleast compatible.
Just burn the movies or tv shows to a dvd.
you can use the built in vista dvd burning or any software, its just like if you were putting files on a dvd to transfer them to another computer.
Im my experience everysingle tv episode i bittorrented has played fine on my two DIVX standalone players, and both of those were super cheap.

So just give it a try.

also note, most of the players only show the first 8 characters of the files on the dvd, so if its a bunch of episodes you might want to to rename the files.
posted by Iax at 5:52 PM on December 10, 2008


MediaCoder is one free app that you can use to convert your video files to DivX format. It will also help you identify what codecs your existing .AVIs are using.
posted by cwhitfcd at 7:33 PM on December 10, 2008


You may also want to get in the habit of creating the discs with UDF file structure instead of ISO. Your burning application (such as Nero) should give you the option to choose between the two. UDF allows for larger file sizes than ISO, so if you're burning something larger than 2 or 3 gigs, you need to use the UDF file structure. This is really only necessary for DVDs.
posted by ijoyner at 12:32 PM on December 11, 2008


As everyone suspected for the most part I can just burn stuff to DVD and my player handles it. Media coder does seem to convert things that are already Divx though I haven't really given it a work out yet.
posted by Mitheral at 10:40 PM on February 1, 2009


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