Turning an iPod up to 11
May 20, 2008 7:27 PM   Subscribe

Is there any way to increase the overall volume on an iPod shuffle?

I'm using the iPod to listen to podcasts, audiobooks and the like, while working in a noisy office and riding public transit to and fro. I have not set a maximum volume from iTunes. But most files max out at a volume that's often too low to override the general ambient roar. I'd like to be able to crank it up to 11 when necessary.

I'm using the stock earbuds and am hoping not to have to invest in others unless that's unavoidable.
posted by zadcat to Computers & Internet (9 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
The stock earbuds never stayed deep enough in my ear to really allow me to hear loud volumes and low bass. I spent $15 on crappy Sony MDR-ED21 headphones to fix that, they have a little nubbin that sticks slightly in, but not too deep. I never liked the headphones that go deeper into the ear.

Short of amplifying all your audio files in Audacity or something I don't think you aren't going to be able to override the max iPod volume.
posted by melvinwang at 7:44 PM on May 20, 2008


You may want a headphone amp, greater flexibility, better volume control.
posted by iamabot at 7:45 PM on May 20, 2008


Oh I forgot to mention, did you try the volume adjustment in iTunes? On the Mac, control-click and use "get info" on a file. It's under the Options panel. I sort of just assumed you did. I don't know if it transfers to the iPod, though.
posted by melvinwang at 7:46 PM on May 20, 2008


Would isolation headphones work? I'd be concerned with having the volume too high, but not realizing it due to the environments you're in.
posted by Camel of Space at 8:04 PM on May 20, 2008


I also switched to a $20 pair of Sony in the ear type headphones (MDR-EX51) and my iPod sounded twice as loud. I can't get a good fit with the original headphones. Actually, I think few people can, but they stick to them because they either don't know better or they like to look like they have an iPod.

Here's a test. Put in the original headphones. Turn on whatever you'd like to listen to. Jam the headphones into your ears like you're trying to plug your ears. Most likely, things will not only sound louder, but you'll hear a much better bass response.
posted by advicepig at 8:06 PM on May 20, 2008


You can actually amplify the volume of your audio files within iTunes. Simply select the file(s) in question, right click and choose "get info". In the box that comes up, there is a slider for "Volume Adjustment"; click on the checkbox next to it, then slide it wayyyy up. Voila! Your files now go to 11.
posted by OlderThanTOS at 10:58 PM on May 20, 2008


^ OlderThanTOS — "You can actually amplify the volume of your audio files within iTunes. Simply select the file(s) in question, right click and choose "get info". In the box that comes up, there is a slider for "Volume Adjustment"; click on the checkbox next to it, then slide it wayyyy up. Voila! Your files now go to 11."

This sounds awfully like its applying ReplayGain or normalization to the track(s). If that's the case, you may run into clipping. Which will sound terrible, in all likelihood.
posted by Smoosh Faced Lion at 3:35 AM on May 21, 2008


No no no. You want to go get the nicer headphones. Years ago I used to think it was funny when people would say "if it's too loud, then you're too old," and frown on the retort that "well hearing loss isn't funny," but uh, now I'm the one who gets to say that. You want to get the bigger headphones, the circular over the ear cans that block out other sound. To be clear, I'm not talking about foam resting over your ears, I'm talking about the ones that circle your ears - you can probably get a good pair for fifty bucks. Otherwise, you're trying to drown out the noise with louder noise. Is buying over the ear headphones avoidable? Yes, but so is hearing loss. Take a pick.
posted by history is a weapon at 7:42 AM on May 21, 2008


nthing the headphones recommendation - you need in-ear buds... the iphone buds are too exposed and don't close off the ear canal at all.

turning it up to 11 is just going to destroy your ears. you want earbuds or headphones that output a lower volume, but you can hear it because they block out the other crap... then you get to hear your stuff AND not be deaf later!
posted by twiggy at 8:36 AM on May 21, 2008


« Older Should I grade grub now or later or ever?   |   Testing a Hunter attic fan controller? Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.