Get me to “Yes” on these peaches.
August 5, 2021 11:17 AM   Subscribe

Del Monte “No Sugar Added” 14.5 ounce canned sliced peaches, expiration date April 11 of 2020. The can is un-dented, and the top of the can is still nicely concave, indicating a good seal. They look mighty tasty on the label. Should I? Would you?
posted by BostonTerrier to Food & Drink (11 answers total)
 
They're fine. Canned goods last quite a long time, safely. Quality will degrade over time, but you are well within the Great Quality timeframe. I wouldn't worry a bit.
posted by theora55 at 11:22 AM on August 5 [26 favorites]


The no sugar added stuff isn't unsweetened, it has fake sugar added, and fake sugar tastes like poison once it's expired. Normal peaches in juice, yeah go for it. Peaches in expired sucralose liquid? No.

I will pay you the lost $1.36 to not eat something that tastes nasty.
posted by phunniemee at 11:22 AM on August 5 [9 favorites]


My mom has several times bought me "no sugar added" canned fruit and I keep dumping it because it tastes like crap even unexpired. Nutrasweet and splenda just aren't the same. Get unsweetened or get sugar. I would not.
posted by If only I had a penguin... at 11:25 AM on August 5 [6 favorites]


Open it and take a taste. If the can is in good shape there is nothing there that will harm you. If it tastes a bit off or you just don't like the taste then toss it.
posted by metahawk at 11:30 AM on August 5 [7 favorites]


fake sugar tastes like poison once it's expired

Not long expired, either. Diet Pepsi becomes undrinkable just about on the expiration date. (Amazing that something so inorganic can expire, but...)

However, it's not actually dangerous. If you don't mind the taste...
posted by praemunire at 11:30 AM on August 5 [1 favorite]


The no sugar added stuff isn't unsweetened, it has fake sugar added, and fake sugar tastes like poison once it's expired. Normal peaches in juice, yeah go for it. Peaches in expired sucralose liquid? No.

I agree 100%; I eat expired food all the time but I would toss this crap. Here's the ingredient list from Target with the fake sugar highlighted:

Peaches, Water, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Acesulfame Potassium, Sucralose.
posted by saveyoursanity at 11:37 AM on August 5 [3 favorites]


Response by poster: Mr. Terrier has escorted the can to the trash. Thanks, everybody. Case closed.
posted by BostonTerrier at 11:50 AM on August 5 [6 favorites]


Some 'no sugar added' fruit has concentrated juice added.
posted by theora55 at 11:55 AM on August 5 [2 favorites]


Yeah, it's too late for that can of peaches, but if they did NOT have any fake sweetener I'd go for it. Canned goods are basically immortal.
posted by fiercecupcake at 2:44 PM on August 5 [2 favorites]


Best answer: Peaches are in season. You can in all likelihood get an amazing locally-grown peach, right now, and eat it at its moment of peak ripeness. I think you should do that.
posted by box at 3:16 PM on August 5 [9 favorites]


This may be the place to share this story:
Sucralose was discovered in the lab of Les Hough at Queen Elizabeth College, London in 1976 as part of a project sponsored by Tate & Lyle the sugar megacorp. T&L had access to hella quantities of sugar which was sold retail at €1/kg. They wanted to know if value could be added to the raw material so it could be sold higher up the economic ladder; not necessarily as food. Riaz Khan, a previous student of Hough's, was working for T&L. He phoned his old boss to ask for a sample of a chlorinated sugar. Hough was busy so handed the phone to Shashikant Phadnis, a younger more available research chemist. Khan said he wanted to test the compound which the lab had just purified. Phadnis heard this as taste the white powder and - the thought being the deed - dipped a small spatula into the powder and applied it to his tongue; finding a tiny amount to be super sweet. By the time Hough returned to the lab, Phadnis had taste-tested all the vials in the lab finding many of them sweet and some sweeter than others! The first compound was thereafter locally called serendipitose.
Don't do this at home kids . . . only in the lab.
posted by BobTheScientist at 6:10 AM on August 6 [6 favorites]


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