So what's in Veronica Falls' record collection?
March 20, 2013 7:47 AM   Subscribe

So, lately I've been listening to the new Veronica Falls album. I'm drawn to songs like this [live version] and this: pure, jangly, motorik fuzz-pop. I need more, many more, songs along the same lines. So, who's mining this Black Tamourine-style vein of music at the moment aside from Veronica Falls?

I guess why these songs struck me is because they're so like the neo-psychedelia I used to listen to on campus radio in New Zealand in the early '90s, by bands like the Pin Group, Look Blue Go Purple, and Dadamah (especially the bit from 1:08 onwards, and on this track), and some of Roy Montgomery's solo stuff. What these tracks have in common is: guitar work with an emphasis on circular, repetitive chord progressions; minor-major key resolutions; driving or motorik beats; and a kind of low-fi, fuzz-pop recording sensibility.

So, what sources are these bands drawing on? People mention '80s Sarah Records and C86 bands in connection with Veronica Falls, but the only Sarah Records band I really know is Secret Shine and they do more of an MBV/shoegaze thing. Where's the stuff VF is presumably drawing on from that scene? What else should I be listening to, both from those earlier scenes and on the band circuit now? Thanks!
posted by Sonny Jim to Media & Arts (8 answers total) 10 users marked this as a favorite
 
One of my favorite bands... The High Violets:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a55KQBFyqa0
posted by bobdow at 8:09 AM on March 20, 2013 [1 favorite]


That reminds me very much of the bands that were on Slumberland Records in the 90s, and/or Versus (or pre-Versus Flower) which was on Teen Beat records in the 90s. I mean, that song could be a Versus song.
posted by OmieWise at 8:10 AM on March 20, 2013


On Slumberland I'm thinking mostly of early Velocity Girl and Lorelie. Discography.
posted by OmieWise at 8:11 AM on March 20, 2013


Black Tambourine were on Slumberland, weren't they? And yes, Velocity Girl. Definitely. Thanks, Omiewise! And, bobdow? Bingo!
posted by Sonny Jim at 8:20 AM on March 20, 2013


I think Black Tambourine was on Slumberland.
posted by OmieWise at 8:40 AM on March 20, 2013


In Sarah Records terms, they're more in the vein of the 14 Iced Bears, the Sea Urchins or the Golden Dawn, but what really jumps out at me influence-wise here is the Pastels, the Shop Assistants, and really old Primal Scream.
posted by lefty lucky cat at 8:49 AM on March 20, 2013


I assume that, since you were listening to campus radio in New Zealand, you are already well-versed in the Flying Nun catalog. If not, go there.

Some others that come immediately to mind:
Fuzztones
Brian Jonestown Massacre
Sun Dial
early Stereolab

Also, exploring the artists on the Children of Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the Second Psychedelic Era, 1976–1995 box set will provide you will hours of entertainment.

I must provide links to one of my personal favorites, the pre-1990 Dentists:
I Had An Excellent Dream
She Dazzled Me With Basil
I Can See Your House From Up Here
Tony Bastable v John Noakes
posted by otters walk among us at 11:11 AM on March 20, 2013 [2 favorites]


Thanks so much! There's so much here to work through, which is great. Have to say, I'm really enjoying the first High Violets album at the moment.

otters walk among us: obviously, the Flying Nun stuff was in the water, so to speak, in NZ in the '90s. Oddly, though, it wasn't really that influential on the second wave of bands I grew up listening to at that time. (The one exception, I guess, being the Clean.) The bands I was into were more immediately influenced by MBV and Dinosaur Jr than the earlier wave of FN jangle-pop and sounded quite different. Louder, for a start. Hence my ignorance of much of the earlier stuff and its influences. But thanks so much for the links: they're a real roadmap for future discovery!
posted by Sonny Jim at 5:34 AM on March 21, 2013


« Older I want to live in the 20s & 30s. What TV /...   |   Y'know, the one with.... Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.