What is the new word for "awesome"?
September 28, 2012 5:07 PM   Subscribe

What is the new word for "awesome"?

In the 1950's it was swell, in the 1970's groovy, the 1980's rad, the 1990's cool...

In recent years, I have heard a lot of awesome. I think that awesome is at or past its peak. What other words have people been using for positive exclamations?

Some that have crossed my desk: fierce, baller, sweet (though sweet may be on its way out as well)... any ideas?

Bonus -- any websites that track word use like this, over time.
posted by kellybird to Writing & Language (124 answers total) 32 users marked this as a favorite
 
My son says 'sick' a lot. Like "that is soooo sick"
posted by RustyBrooks at 5:08 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


Cool. Cool cool cool.
posted by arcticwoman at 5:09 PM on September 28, 2012 [8 favorites]


Fetch.
posted by chesty_a_arthur at 5:10 PM on September 28, 2012 [47 favorites]


Sick.
Tight.
Flippin'
posted by grateful at 5:11 PM on September 28, 2012


I think cool won't go out of style. The other examples so far all seem dated to me. Awesome had a good revival, but it's been dying for a while. I heard it in every commercial during one break a couple years ago.
posted by stopgap at 5:12 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


Sweetie Darling beat me to it! Yes, fetch will never happen. As for the new word, I mostly hear and say "cool."
posted by DeltaForce at 5:13 PM on September 28, 2012


The new version of "awesome" is "epic."
posted by kdar at 5:13 PM on September 28, 2012 [25 favorites]


'Tastic.

Although my inner grammar nazi hates it.
posted by tooloudinhere at 5:14 PM on September 28, 2012


sweet

i say boss and wicked, but then again that's just ME trying to bring boss and wicked
you should start saying it too

Only high schoolers say epic..
posted by lhude sing cuccu at 5:15 PM on September 28, 2012


The 90s where I lived it was "sweet" not cool.
posted by fshgrl at 5:15 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


Meritorious
Capital
Outstanding
posted by The World Famous at 5:15 PM on September 28, 2012 [18 favorites]


In all seriousness I pretty much just hear "cool" and "great".
posted by chesty_a_arthur at 5:16 PM on September 28, 2012


According to my ten year old son, "sick" is "so two years ago." He says he and his friends just use "neat."

What's old is new again, I guess.
posted by bondcliff at 5:17 PM on September 28, 2012 [6 favorites]


Only high schoolers say epic..

That is, in fact, exactly my point. It's what the kids are saying.

(Also, it's not entirely true: in my peer group, which is late-20s Internet-worker yuppies, it's pretty common.)
posted by kdar at 5:17 PM on September 28, 2012 [8 favorites]


streets ahead
posted by rhizome at 5:17 PM on September 28, 2012 [18 favorites]


Dope
posted by jamjam at 5:18 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


What a bitchin' question.
posted by Cold Lurkey at 5:18 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


Awesome remains awesome although when I am feeling especially pretentious I will bellow TREMENDOUS instead.
posted by elizardbits at 5:19 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


Epic.

And, legen... wait for it... dary.
posted by E3 at 5:22 PM on September 28, 2012 [7 favorites]


clutch...."yo that is so clutch"
posted by PeaPod at 5:22 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


"Legit" (as in legitimate, or "2 legit to quit") seems to making a comeback.
posted by King Bee at 5:23 PM on September 28, 2012 [8 favorites]


Pail or Bucket
posted by any major dude at 5:23 PM on September 28, 2012


Brilliant!
posted by heyho at 5:24 PM on September 28, 2012


Epic and Brilliant.

Sweet is very late 90's/early 2000's, as is Tight.

Sick and Fierce are less wince-inducing, but more dated than Awesome to my ear, rather than less.

I'm also hearing Rad, Boss, and Bitchin' comebacks. There was a brief moment of Win/Winning surrounding the Charlie Sheen business last year.

When I catch myself saying Awesome a lot, I try to mix it up. Amazing and Fantastic tend to come out most. I can only hope I'm heralding the new slang.
posted by Sara C. at 5:24 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


Too many people are saying "totes (blank)" - for totally cool/sweet/whatever. Nth epic, sick, awesome. In my culture, amazing; and wow (as a comment more than a descriptor) or the triple wow wow wow.
posted by attercoppe at 5:26 PM on September 28, 2012


I hear "legit" a lot from undergrads. It's not applied to any old awesome thing though, it's held in reserve for describing something whose awesome qualities awesomely exceed run of the mill awesomeness.
posted by TungstenChef at 5:26 PM on September 28, 2012 [7 favorites]


Bone zone
posted by Patbon at 5:27 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


I mostly still say cool. I occasionally say "rad" or "awesome." But, I am a product of the '90s.
posted by asnider at 5:27 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


As a side effect of too much Dr Who, I now say 'Fantastic!' more than I should.

It seems that is not a commonly used word, as it surprises people.
posted by cmyk at 5:27 PM on September 28, 2012 [3 favorites]


"Beast!"
posted by sarah_pdx at 5:30 PM on September 28, 2012


The teenagers I used to kind of look after once spent an afternoon telling me about 'peng' and 'butter peng' (one is for people, the other objects). It made me feel very old. They're in inner London and this was within the last year.

Oh and I copped a load of crap from some teenagers in 2003 for using the word 'ace'. Doesn't everyone use 'cool' still? I kind of think it has entered the language semi-permanently in the same way as 'OK'.
posted by everydayanewday at 5:31 PM on September 28, 2012


My twitter feed is suggesting ironic-turned-unironic returns for "rad" and "trill"

I've developed an unfortunate rad habit myself
posted by elr at 5:32 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


The new hot dish. As in, "Keen jacket! It's the new hot dish!"
posted by esmerelda_jenkins at 5:33 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


My old coworker always used "tits" and I hated it. It always made me see breasts on things. Breasts on sushi, breasts on cars, breasts on a new computer. Ugh.
posted by MonsieurBon at 5:36 PM on September 28, 2012 [5 favorites]


I don't understand why words would be in or out of fashion, but I think knowyourmeme.com tracks the use/interest in terms (by search engine requests). Mainly memes, naturally, but it's a start.
posted by MinusCelsius at 5:40 PM on September 28, 2012




Station!
posted by Barry B. Palindromer at 5:45 PM on September 28, 2012 [6 favorites]


on point
posted by duckstab at 5:47 PM on September 28, 2012


Killer
Dope
posted by porn in the woods at 5:48 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


It will always be cool. I don't think awesome's going anywhere either.

Sick, sweet, and epic have all been used for a really long time now.

Groovy should have a comeback (quick, someone make it happen).
posted by heyjude at 5:49 PM on September 28, 2012


Sick
posted by vincele at 5:49 PM on September 28, 2012


I hear the kids saying 'swag' a lot. I think it can be used multitudinously.
posted by carsonb at 5:49 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


fire.
posted by !Jim at 5:52 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


I was at a concert recently and at concert's end someone next to me yelled "Diabolical! Diabolical!"
I thought it was kinda lame.
I like awesome.
posted by space_cookie at 5:52 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


I have heard frat-boy types describe situations or events as "so cash"

My 15-year old brother as of last year still said "sweet", fwiw.
posted by nakedmolerats at 5:53 PM on September 28, 2012


fire.

Wait, that's real? I heard my younger brothers saying that a couple years ago and thought it was some kind of inside joke.
posted by Sara C. at 5:56 PM on September 28, 2012


My 4th grader told me not to say "awesome" because it's a word for kids. He recommended adults use "outstanding" to sound like adults. Anyway, his phrase of late has been "awesome sauce," which is the most awesome of the awesome.
posted by bluedaisy at 5:56 PM on September 28, 2012 [11 favorites]


New Englanders say wicked.
posted by brujita at 5:59 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


Fetch.

stop trying to make fetch happen.
posted by violetk at 6:01 PM on September 28, 2012 [16 favorites]


Aw, y'all are totes adorbs.
posted by headnsouth at 6:02 PM on September 28, 2012 [4 favorites]


Epic, sick, legit and sweet are all words I hear pretty regularly. All the teenagers I know regularly say swag and boss (as in, "that shit is so boss") too. I also hear wicked, and mean, quite regularly. I live in New Zealand.
posted by kwes at 6:02 PM on September 28, 2012


Oh, I love 'boss'! It was slang for 'good' in Liverpool in the early 90s.
posted by everydayanewday at 6:04 PM on September 28, 2012


Recently I have heard "bomb", rather than the now desperately outré "the bomb", and the rather silly "amaze balls". I think both of those are condiments rather than meat and potatoes words like cool or awesome.
posted by Jon Mitchell at 6:04 PM on September 28, 2012


Maybe this is the queer circles I run in, but I've been hearing/saying "fab!" a lot.
posted by kylej at 6:07 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


Gargantuan
posted by Pecinpah at 6:08 PM on September 28, 2012


Pro.
posted by moons in june at 6:10 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


My 10 and 13 year olds use legit, sick, and my 13 year old tried to make "ninja" work as a replacement for awesome in his school but it doesn't seemed to have stuck. I kinda liked it.

They don't use boss like "that car is boss", but they do use "like a boss" -- I just checkmated you like a boss.

Others that I hear these days: epic, brilliant, killer. I'm still holding on to sweet, but I realize it's not popular anymore.
posted by Piano Raptor at 6:14 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


Slightly more awe than awe-some is of course awe-full.

All the kids are saying it.
posted by jenkinsEar at 6:21 PM on September 28, 2012


I think "totes" is past it's prime. I hear it used sarcastically 95% of the time.
posted by DoubleLune at 6:28 PM on September 28, 2012


My son (9 yrs old) says "epic." He fucking rules.
posted by thisclickableme at 6:35 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


I think "baller", "fierce", and "sick" still have some shelf life. I never hear "boss" in the 70s way ("Your Members Only jacket is boss!") but hear "like a boss" all the time (hey, fellow oldsters, did you know that was a video game thing? Yeah.)

"Rad" is back and bigger than ever among white kids, at least. "Amazing!" seems to be big among all girls and the less macho guys. More macho guys seem to use "badass" instead.

"[thing or person] rules" or "rocks" or "for the win" is still au courant here in Boston.

I think "cool" is just a regular vocabulary word now for kids; they don't even think of it as slang any more than they would think of "tall" or "rich" as slang.
posted by Sidhedevil at 6:44 PM on September 28, 2012


Beastmaster.
posted by ND¢ at 6:45 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


There are some specialized ones .

People into weed sometimes say fire or dank for stuff that isn't weed. Like "taco bell would be fire" or "that pizza was dank"

Fighting Gamers say godlike. like "My e. honda is godlike" or "daigo is godlike"

Brooklyn hipsters brought back radical and rad.

FTR I always use totes and adorbs jokingly.
posted by Ad hominem at 6:45 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


I also hear a lot of teen girls doubling words for emphasis. "Oh, my god, I love love your new boots!" "I need to rush or I'll be late late for school!"
posted by Sidhedevil at 6:49 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


Amazeballs
posted by gnutron at 6:57 PM on September 28, 2012 [7 favorites]


About four years ago we used to say "hot fire", as in "that dress is hot fire."

Legit is the only one I saw in this thread that didn't sound dated or timeless (e.g. awesome and cool).
posted by telegraph at 7:06 PM on September 28, 2012


Cool, awesome, sweet, legit; on a lesser scale, sick, badass.

The impression I get from 'epic', 'fierce', 'tight', and 'for the win' is that they're somewhat associated with distinct cultural movements (e.g., 'epic fail' and the Internet) so using them involves more conscious self-awareness with respect to word choice. So I'm inclined to think they might lose steam/already be losing steam, though I'm also kind of talking out of my ass here and others might have different experiences.

I've also heard 'cash' but I associate it mostly with bros. I'm partial to 'rad', 'hype', and 'ill' (e.g., "that's some hype shit" or "that shit is the illest") myself, but I also recognize that I sound like a dweeb most of the time.

Checked in with my sister (highschooler in the Midwest) and 'cool' is apparently still the thing. On preview I agree with Sidhedevil— 'cool' and even 'awesome' are more like verbal punctuation than conscious slang at this point.

('the tits' just makes me laugh)
posted by brieche at 7:06 PM on September 28, 2012


Fresh, fresh to death, amazeballs, awesome sauce (an awesome variant), ridic
posted by murfed13 at 7:09 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


15-year-old son says "epic," "legit," and "sick" are, "Like, two years ago."

Apparently the kids these days are saying "swag." When they write it out, they do #swag. So he and his friends are saying "hashtag swag" when something is, you know, awesome.
posted by cooker girl at 7:09 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


Is awesome really timeless? It seemed like an 80s word during the 90s, though less so than "radical." I heard it starting to get used in a retro-cool way 11 or 12 years ago and it took off from there. The marketers caught on about 5 years ago and I'd say it's been on the downturn the last couple years. Do other people not have this impression, or do I need to start keeping an eye on these kids on my lawn?

Almost everything in this thread (eg fresh, sick, legit) sounds like it wouldn't have been out of place in the late 90s but would sound hilarious to me today. Maybe high school slang in general has just gotten stagnant.
posted by stopgap at 7:15 PM on September 28, 2012


Swagtag
posted by murfed13 at 7:15 PM on September 28, 2012


Back when I was a teen in the latish 70s it was "excellent." I've always hated "awesome." What a waste of a wonderful, powerful word. I sincerely hate "awesome" is on its way out.
posted by primate moon at 7:18 PM on September 28, 2012


sincerely *hope* awesome is on its way out (not hate).
posted by primate moon at 7:19 PM on September 28, 2012


"Swag" is apparently over here in Boston; I saw some very cool girls rolling their eyes at this nerd boy who said "swag" on the subway just the other day.
posted by Sidhedevil at 7:20 PM on September 28, 2012


I feel like 'awesome' is used less in a 90s 'aawweesooooome' sense than it is as a sort of generationally-accepted verbal tic or unconscious reaction, which is why it (and 'cool') have that certain sense of timelessness. So a teenager would think nothing of throwing out a quick 'awesome!' but might notice if some advertiser tried to market a product by talking up its 'awesome factor'. I often hear 'awesome' and 'cool' used as affirmative interjections, e.g., 'awesome, let me have you sign this document'— more an acknowledgement of having heard and understood than actual delight.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, I can't imagine someone saying 'swag' or 'fresh' without trying to project some sort of image, which is why a nerdy-looking kid trying to pull off 'swag' might get eye-rolled at.
posted by brieche at 7:36 PM on September 28, 2012


Can't believe nobody's mentioned "amazing" yet. I hear it all the time.
posted by davebush at 7:37 PM on September 28, 2012


I say "killer." But maybe no one else does.
posted by sweetkid at 7:38 PM on September 28, 2012


I just say "that's so bad." I'm pretty deadpan though so I often have to clarify that it's bad like the Power Glove.
posted by value of information at 7:43 PM on September 28, 2012


"That party last night was amazing. Her house is legit, right? And did you see Keith's abs? God, they were amazing. Hope we can have another amazing night next Friday! #swag"

I think it's all about amazement, legitimacy, and swagger these days.
posted by goosechasing at 7:58 PM on September 28, 2012


Swag has been declared played out ("Another thing white people ruined") in my office of 20-somethings. Tight, up top, sweet, the shit, and honey are the ones that I've heard aside from swag. Oh, and daps has made a comeback.
posted by klangklangston at 8:02 PM on September 28, 2012


K-rad...I'm assured that this is what the cool kids say.

Dude 1: Dude, that was amazeballs!
Dude 2: K-rad for sure!

posted by schyler523 at 8:18 PM on September 28, 2012 [2 favorites]


Also, amazeballs.
posted by schyler523 at 8:20 PM on September 28, 2012


My 13 and 9 y.o. use 'epic', 'sweet' and 'sick'. Never heard 'em say 'dope', 'fetch' or any of that other stuff.
posted by unSane at 8:48 PM on September 28, 2012


Tony. Tits. Ricockulous. Swag.
posted by phaedon at 8:52 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


I use solid.
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 9:10 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


Excellent.
posted by OLechat at 9:15 PM on September 28, 2012


Shiny.
posted by zinon at 9:34 PM on September 28, 2012 [1 favorite]


I use fantastic a lot, with a very Chicago a and an extra sharp c: faayaan taayastik. But that's just me, I think.
posted by esmerelda_jenkins at 11:10 PM on September 28, 2012


Rad. In so cal, at least.
posted by christiehawk at 11:47 PM on September 28, 2012


It's going to be regionally dependent - and social clique specific - but 'awesome' was a pretty generic 'hip' (very common, and at least not uncool) adjective coming from a major west coast city, then finding that the phrase was tired/cliche in Iowa. At the time.

Tight and sweet seem really dated to me, though. I still associate those with when before I even started my stupid MSc.

I guess it really depends on who your social circle respects is using what language, that is/will-be popular*.

But you knew that already.

If you're interested in the phenomenon of "hip" language - try slang Cantonese (although some people say that the base for Cantonese is much more "Chinese" than Mandarin). The British influence has really influenced the ready adaptation of English word-sounds - which is more phonetically consonant with English than the Japanese adaptation - and you get really weird homophonic relationships. But anyway, HK slang seems to evolve really really quickly and might be a better testbed to study this anthropoligcal issue.

Confession of a one-time-success from a shy kid: grade 4 - I KNEW that a stamp collection is uncool. I brought one anyway. I was unexpectedly popular for it. I made up some swear words. People started using them. I'm still uncool, but nobody uses those made up swearwords anymore.
posted by porpoise at 12:19 AM on September 29, 2012


Ace.
posted by amerrydance at 12:37 AM on September 29, 2012


I can't believe I forgot this one, because I actually first saw it on Metafilter, and then a few more times here subsequently:

'random'.

The example I remember was an Ask where someone was requesting people's best suggestions for a vacation he and his girlfriend were planning so that they could have a "random" experience.

I love 'random' because at first glance, it seems to be following a trajectory such as I imagine for 'fortune', which in the European Middle Ages, as embodied in tropes like the Wheel of Fortune and others, was more evenly balanced between good and bad, and maybe even 'happy', which in older literary usage often seems to carry connotations of purely neutral chance that we can still see signs of in 'happenstance' (perhaps).
posted by jamjam at 12:44 AM on September 29, 2012


Awesome's been out for a while. I picked up amazing and delicious a while back but they didn't last. I think when you get older this just stops being a thing.
posted by windykites at 12:52 AM on September 29, 2012


Jamjam, nobody but nobody says random anymore.

Heard a highschool kid very deliberately using "bodacious" the other day. Or some other 80's surfer slang. I can't remember for sure but it was funny.
posted by windykites at 12:57 AM on September 29, 2012


Jamjam, nobody but nobody says random anymore.

Urban Dictionary almost agrees with you, your fastness, nobody but nobodies say 'random' anymore, though there do seem to be bunches of them, but I think it might have legs (many, many skittering legs...).
posted by jamjam at 1:26 AM on September 29, 2012


Safe.
posted by Jabberwocky at 3:00 AM on September 29, 2012


Don't forget your adverbs, either.

They're soooooo good.
posted by ropeladder at 6:05 AM on September 29, 2012


I think "totes brutes" is turning the corner from its original meaning (totally brutal) similarly to "sick" and "ill," and "brutes" will start meaning "awesome" shortly. (Warning: this bit of cant is likely particularly gay, and not "gay" as in "awful." SPEAKING OF: I suspect something of a rise in "that's gay" to mean good, instead of bad. Language is totes brutes to the gays!)
posted by RJ Reynolds at 7:05 AM on September 29, 2012


Jokes
Hench
Legend
posted by iotic at 7:18 AM on September 29, 2012


Young gentlepersons and scholars are heard to cry "Excelsior!" when something particularly appeals to them.
posted by mr. digits at 7:20 AM on September 29, 2012 [4 favorites]


Strong.

Also can be used for "forceful" or "fucked up" semi-ironically.

"Hey did you hear that Ben stole his mom's car and drove it off a pier?"

"Strong."
posted by Potomac Avenue at 7:36 AM on September 29, 2012 [1 favorite]


3 year olds in Atlanta rock out with 'aaa-MAAA-Zing'.

Can we bring back 'toot-sweet'? Hey? Who's with me?
posted by Bron at 9:44 AM on September 29, 2012


About three weeks ago I was test-driving a car with long-expired plates on the car but with a dealer plate crammed in the lower part of the windshield and not very visible. I got pulled over and the young cop came up to my window and said "your tabs are epically out of date."
posted by bz at 9:59 AM on September 29, 2012 [2 favorites]


Chaaaah... Dude! But, I'm 68.
posted by ScotsLament at 10:03 AM on September 29, 2012 [1 favorite]


The new new word for awesome, the one that's been used somewhat across the pond over the years but is due now for a real surge here amongst America's Youth....?

Pukka
posted by carsonb at 10:15 AM on September 29, 2012 [1 favorite]


My coolest friend says "amaze" all the time. "Oh my god this pork skewer is amaze"
posted by Gonestarfishing at 10:18 AM on September 29, 2012


I read most of these and thought" yeah, that's old."
I feel like ridiculously widespread and popular slang like comes in waves, tiny and then building before a tidal wave. Awesome was the last tidal wave, and I don't think we've seen another yet. Epic was close, but not quite. And all of these are popular, but EVERYONE used awesome, and there's not one here that's that universal.
posted by FirstMateKate at 1:41 PM on September 29, 2012 [1 favorite]


from a twelve year old daughter, most definitely....beast
posted by rudy26 at 2:40 PM on September 29, 2012


My students say Beast but not before a noun and not by itself, always in a sentence.
posted by Kazimirovna at 4:43 PM on September 29, 2012


And chill. Young adult term.
posted by Kazimirovna at 4:45 PM on September 29, 2012


Brill.
posted by seawallrunner at 5:54 PM on September 29, 2012


I mostly still say cool. I occasionally say "rad" or "awesome." But, I am a product of the '90s.

I mostly still say cool. I occasionally say "rad" or "awesome." But, I am a product of the '80s.


Is awesome really timeless? It seemed like an 80s word during the 90s, though less so than "radical."

I think that this one may be regional. I think that it was California surf town slang that went national and has been receding. I still know plenty of people in my California surf town that have never stopped using it.
posted by ActingTheGoat at 6:19 PM on September 29, 2012


Bet.
posted by chinesefood at 8:09 PM on September 29, 2012


Hella, as in hella cool.
posted by ms_rasclark at 8:28 PM on September 29, 2012


In São Paulo we use "classe", it's in Portuguese but interestingly it is used in Berlin and Moscow in exactly the same way, "class" in German and Russian as a slang word meaning "awesome", could work in English too!
posted by Tom-B at 6:38 AM on September 30, 2012


Whopper is big in some Irish circles.
posted by night_train at 12:55 PM on September 30, 2012


"Chill". As of a year ago. Teens. In Switzerland.

I myself am partial to "keen". But then again I'm, oh, about thrice a teen?
posted by labberdasher at 1:01 PM on September 30, 2012


Choice.
posted by coolsara at 5:19 PM on September 30, 2012


I think that this one may be regional. I think that it was California surf town slang that went national and has been receding. I still know plenty of people in my California surf town that have never stopped using it.

Yes, this. I grew up in a California surf town. I've always said it; probably always will.
posted by violetk at 12:15 AM on October 1, 2012


Chiming in with "Beast"; a friend of mine teaches high school, and recently mentioned using "beast" as an adjective.
posted by Greg Nog at 10:24 AM on October 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


Hectic.
posted by po at 8:26 AM on October 2, 2012


Another vote for "amazing."

I have never heard anyone in real life apart from geeks (real social outcasts) use the word "epic." I have heard it on television as scripted dialogue and it always sounds extremely awkward. No one who isn't a geek uses the word "epic," ever. In fact, the word "epic" is so powerfully geeky that you actually become a geek as soon as you say it. Sorry, geeks.
posted by 4bulafia at 6:53 PM on November 22, 2012


My two eldest sons (10, 13) use 'epic' continually. They are definitely not social outcasts, but they do self-identify as geeks. The thing is, geeks are cool these days, in their schools anyway.
posted by unSane at 4:14 AM on November 23, 2012


Epic was a major bro-word of a year or two ago.
posted by DoubleLune at 6:21 AM on November 23, 2012


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