Does this strike a chord?
January 23, 2012 10:19 PM   Subscribe

Can you identify the song which uses this rather unusual and distinctive chord progression?

This came up as a challenge somewhere else when we were discussing great chord prgressions and I'm damned if I can figure it out. The question is as follows:
Who can identify this chorus section from a well know pop hit? I came across it in my oldies band the other day and I found it highly interesting. It may be just unique enough to peg the song from, I don't know. I do know we can't say that about too many chord progressions, can we.

IV ii7 III7sus III7
IV ii7 III7sus III7
IV ii7 III7sus III7
vi II7 ii7 V

Hint: 1969, key of G
posted by unSane to Media & Arts (12 answers total) 6 users marked this as a favorite
 
If you're not familiar with Nashville notation, in G the chords would be

C / Am7 / B7sus4 / B7
C / Am7 / B7sus4 / B7
C / Am7 / B7sus4 / B7
Em7 / A7 / Am7 / D
posted by unSane at 10:21 PM on January 23, 2012


Strange that it's in G but the G chord is never used.
posted by cogat at 2:04 AM on January 24, 2012


Ah, it's the chorus.
posted by cogat at 2:11 AM on January 24, 2012


Confused because the III chord would be minor but that's not what you're saying in your other notation.
posted by Obscure Reference at 5:10 AM on January 24, 2012


That's because it's modulated to Em for the chorus.

Does the Nashville system use Roman numerals?

At first the B7sus - B7 made me think of California Dreamin', but that's not it.
posted by iotic at 5:24 AM on January 24, 2012 [1 favorite]


Something by The Beatles, maybe? youtube
posted by iconomy at 5:43 AM on January 24, 2012


Sounds kind of similar to Venus by Shocking Blue
posted by canoehead at 7:41 AM on January 24, 2012


yeah, I'm going with Venus by Shocking Blue. Just played it on my iphone and I think that's it.
posted by spicynuts at 8:38 AM on January 24, 2012


Nah the Venus hook is something like C7/B7/Em with a Em/A and Am/D vamp for the verse and main chorus. The B7sus4 makes it sound similar though I agree.
posted by unSane at 9:24 AM on January 24, 2012


Does the Nashville system use Roman numerals?


Yep, it uses Roman numerals relative to the tonic, so in C, C is I, Cm is i, D is II, Dm is ii and so on.
posted by unSane at 9:25 AM on January 24, 2012


Kinda sounds like the chorus for More Today Than Yesterday by Spiral Starecase?
posted by anthom at 10:18 AM on January 24, 2012


Wow, Anthom, you got it!
posted by unSane at 11:49 AM on January 24, 2012


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