Blogs/Articles about no video media.
June 15, 2010 2:31 PM   Subscribe

I'm looking for inspiring blogs and articles on, not only not watching tv, but not watching movies or any video entertainment.

I've seen the threads about canceling cable and watching Hulu, etc., but what I'm interested in is reading about people who refuse to spend any time staring at any kind of video entertainment -- no tv programs, no movies, etc. All I can find so far is http://www.turnoffyourtv.com/. Anything else out there?
posted by IKnittedThisSockPuppetMyself to Media & Arts (14 answers total) 7 users marked this as a favorite
 
I hate to be the guy who questions the questioner but - why, exactly? There's nothing that inherently says movies or TV are an inferior form of entertainment - some are good and some are bad. Citizen Kane is better than The Pelican Brief. Mad Men is better than the Bridges of Madison County. Most blogs about cancelling cable to watch Hulu or replace with Netflix are about replacing bad or costly TV and movies with better or more affordable TV and movies. What is your goal here?
posted by l33tpolicywonk at 2:39 PM on June 15, 2010


I haven't had cable in 5+ years, and when I sold the idea to my girlfriend (now wife), it was less about money than about not wasting time vegging out in front of the tv. There's plenty of worthwhile shows, movies, and video games, but watch what you want to watch when you want to it. Don't just watch what's on.

That said, I find your position somewhat puzzling. I'd like to hear more.
posted by Oktober at 2:45 PM on June 15, 2010


Well, I wouldn't call it a position, because I don't really know how I feel about it, but the idea is that, even though the quality of what I watch might be excellent, I am still staring passively at a screen, for hours on end. Which sometimes seems problematic. So I'd like to read some articles, but I'm hardly advocating a no-video-entertainment world just yet.
posted by IKnittedThisSockPuppetMyself at 2:51 PM on June 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


I'm not familiar with these sites, but google had some "similar pages" results:

whitedot.org
tvturnoff.org
tvbgone.com
posted by belau at 3:03 PM on June 15, 2010


I'm not sure that I understand how passively reading articles, on a screen, about not watching movies or tv, on a screen, is necessary. Couldn't you just use this time to pursue your hobbies, or read about your hobbies? I don't understand how blogs or articles that say "go out and pursue your hobbies!" are better than doing exactly that.

Perhaps some sites geared towards lifehacks or time management would help, like 43 folders or lifehacker?
posted by loriginedumonde at 3:04 PM on June 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


You might also find some articles if you search for raising children without television, too. There's a chance you'd find personal stories this way.
posted by belau at 3:06 PM on June 15, 2010 [3 favorites]


Here's a Slate.com article that might actually be useful. Even though it's not about television or movies, it's the same idea I think: What happened when I gave up the internet.
posted by belau at 3:10 PM on June 15, 2010


is the intention to give up TV or is it to give up passive entertainment consumption? I mean, if you aim to turn off your TV and replace it with trashy sci-fi novels, do you feel that would be a net positive? Would you prefer time spent playing actively playing Bejeweled online to time spent watching PBS documentaries on a TV? ... or do you really to just get off the couch and do something?

Not trying to poke holes ... just refine what it is you're looking for since recommendations can vary based upon the goals.
posted by bl1nk at 3:39 PM on June 15, 2010


Hell, I can't locate it but a few years ago I read -- possibly here -- an interview with a guy who denied all forms of passive entertainment, including books. Maybe someone else can locate it.
posted by griphus at 3:39 PM on June 15, 2010


Try searching for "reducing screen time". The majority of the results are written in reference to children and teenagers, however, there is plenty in there for adults as well.
posted by toodles at 4:08 PM on June 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


Possibly tangent, but Four arguments for the elimination of television is an interesting book on the subject.
posted by Orb2069 at 4:35 PM on June 15, 2010 [1 favorite]


I think this is a great idea, especially if you're approaching it as a Steve Pavlina-style 30-day experiment. Try it for 30 days, see how it affects your life. The content of modern television has become increasingly good - there's some amazing stuff out there now (Friday Night Lights, The Wire, Studio 60, West Wing, etc.) But the habit of watching television, especially just plopping down and zoning out to whatever's currently on can be demoralizing.

Some inspiration for you: http://www.herecomeseverybody.org/2008/04/looking-for-the-mouse.html.
posted by zanni at 6:08 PM on June 15, 2010


Check out turnoffyourtv.com, which is filled with interesting-looking articles. Maybe that will lead you somewhere. Here is their link page, which lists White Dot and other sites. There is also the Center for Screen Time Awareness. The book, Living Without the Screen: Causes and Consequences of Life without Television could be interesting, and there's an article titled Television- and Screen-Based Activity and Mental Well-Being in Adults, both of which might cite some further resources. Personally, I think these are serious, important questions, so good on you for searching out this kind of information.
posted by thegreatfleecircus at 7:15 AM on June 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


Seconding Four Arguments For the Elimination of Television.

TV Watching, Other Sedentary Behavior Tied to Shorter Life

Top 10 Reasons You Should Stop Watching TV

How to Stop Watching Television

In 1974 winter I went to live for a year in Italy, then rural Greece, then 10 years in India. For 11 years I didn't watch any TV. It was great! I noticed the kids and people in India who didn't not watch TV were more original thinkers, more creative, more personal, more curious about life and interested in amicable conversation. They were way more informed about the rest of the world than any American I knew. They regularly read newspapers, listened to the radio.

It was only after 8 years back in the USA in 1993 that I got cable, knew I'd be addicted and I was. The internet took me away from TV in 2000. And now the TV really seems to me like a much less relevant form of information or entertainment than ever before.

I commend you on your decision and wish you all the best on your journey.
posted by nickyskye at 8:32 AM on June 16, 2010 [1 favorite]


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