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Name that drink.
April 26, 2007 12:27 AM   Subscribe

What do I call this drink? I'm a pretty regular scotch and soda drinker, but was recently introduced to a new libation. My buddy ordered a scotch, ginger ale and bitters. It's good, but what is it called?

I've been ordering this at some of the better bars around town but feel like an ass explaining the drink each time. Is there a common name for this drink? My google fu has failed me.

Specifically it's a tall single of decent lower end scotch, usually Dewars. It's topped off with ginger ale then finished with just a dash of Angostura bitters.

This has to be an established drink, it seems so obvious.
posted by Telf to Sports, Hobbies, & Recreation (23 answers total) 7 users marked this as a favorite
 
Almost Bitter 'n' Twisted
posted by tellurian at 12:35 AM on April 26, 2007


Sounds like a Horse's Neck.
posted by brautigan at 1:18 AM on April 26, 2007


I'd call it a "scotch and dry ginger with a dash of bitters", because it's a variant of a standard spirits-and-mixer. There are named drinks that come close, but not exactly so.
posted by holgate at 1:21 AM on April 26, 2007


Scotch and dry? Usually with lime as a garnish, so you can specify bitters if you want... I dont think it has a cocktail name, because it's not a cocktail.
posted by twirlypen at 1:39 AM on April 26, 2007


Yes, it sounds like a Horse's Neck made with whisky instead of brandy, and with the bitters added at the end rather than over the ice with the spirit.
posted by obiwanwasabi at 1:43 AM on April 26, 2007


If it hasn't been named, I propose the G.I. — it's got ginger (the movie star), scotch (Gilligan), and bitters (the Howells).
posted by rob511 at 1:47 AM on April 26, 2007 [3 favorites]


I once found this drink in a random cocktail recipe book, which simply called it a Highball. It is an excellent drink. However, in my experience, ordering a "Highball" at six different bars will get you six different drinks. I stopped trying after I ordered one at my beloved hole-in-the-wall hometown dive bar, and the waitress said "Hon, you just ordered a type of glass."
posted by churl at 2:20 AM on April 26, 2007 [3 favorites]


Very, very close to a Dickie Ward. Just needs the lime wedge garnish.
posted by Cuppatea at 2:57 AM on April 26, 2007


Not exactly an answer, but I suspect you'll enjoy a Whisky Mac, which is scotch and Stone's Green Ginger Wine on the rocks. Some people add ginger ale as well.

(Oy, I've just been pumped full of Dalwhinnie by a Scots mate and am feeling much the worse for wear....)
posted by i_am_joe's_spleen at 4:59 AM on April 26, 2007


Even if there were a name for it, if it were established somewhere, odds are most bartenders have never heard of it (try ordering any random Webtender drink by name).

Besides, it's more impressive if you confidently list off the ingredients: a succinct "Scotch and ginger ale with a dash of bitters." (Compare this to the baby-faced bloke who orders a "Manhattan" because it's a "Manhattan," not because he knows what's in it.)
posted by stance at 5:51 AM on April 26, 2007 [1 favorite]


Bitters highball. He just ordered a variant on the highball, but as someone else stated -- unless you're at a country club in your dinner jacket smoking hand rolled havanas, no one will know what you're talking about. Whenever I think of highballs I think of Thurston from Gilligan's island.
posted by geoff. at 7:14 AM on April 26, 2007


The whiskey-and-ginger-ale combination (sometimes with club soda, sometimes with a twist o' lemon) is often called a Presbyterian. I've seen it listed with both rye and bourbon as the main ingredient, but the name suggests scotch rather strongly. But I've never seen it listed with bitters.

There's probably a recondite theological joke to be made by coming up with a name to match a "bitter Presbyterian," but I can't come up with it. And unless it's cocktail hour at the seminary, the reference may be lost on most...
posted by BT at 7:17 AM on April 26, 2007


Many years ago some foreign customers asked me for a "whiskey American" which they defined as whiskey (no specific type) and "dry ginger" (ginger ale). Haven't heard that before or since, and no sign of bitters but maybe you could call it a "bitter American" if you don't want to offend Presbyterians.
posted by bink at 8:05 AM on April 26, 2007


The whiskey-and-ginger-ale combination...is often called a Presbyterian.

Many years ago some foreign customers asked me for a "whiskey American" which they defined as whiskey (no specific type) and "dry ginger" (ginger ale).

I'm surprised. Whisky and ginger ale is common in Canada, and it's a "rye and ginger." ("Dry" ginger...? Eh?) Scotch that if you're particular about the Scotch part, but can I recommend Canadian Club?

In which case, "a rye and ginger with a dash of bitters, please."

That said, I've tried to order rye-n-ginger (best with a wedge of lime, I think) in many parts of the US (admittedly not Florida, though) and been treated to a very blank look. Or a smile and nod and a walk to the bar, and then blank look has returned. Loads of places didn't have ginger ale (!), and many had no idea what "rye" might be, despite visible bottles of rye.

Weird note on ginger ale, should you run into a ginger-ale-less bar: 7-Up plus a finger of cola = passable "ginger ale."
posted by kmennie at 8:26 AM on April 26, 2007


"Dry" ginger...? Eh?

One of the more mild-flavored ginger ales, such as, uh, Canada Dry. The old version of the drink was sweeter, stronger, and IMO better on its own but less suitable as a mixer. (Looks like you're in Ottawa — do you get Vernors that far from Detroit? That's the sort of thing that dry ginger ale contrasts with.)
posted by nebulawindphone at 9:23 AM on April 26, 2007


There's probably a recondite theological joke to be made by coming up with a name to match a "bitter Presbyterian," but I can't come up with it.

A Calvinist?
posted by oneirodynia at 9:36 AM on April 26, 2007


What i_am_joe's_spleen said. Whiskey Macs are yummy. But Stone's Original Ginger can be difficult to find in the US.
posted by terrapin at 11:28 AM on April 26, 2007


Many years ago some foreign customers asked me for a "whiskey American" which they defined as whiskey (no specific type) and "dry ginger" (ginger ale). Haven't heard that before or since, and no sign of bitters but maybe you could call it a "bitter American" if you don't want to offend Presbyterians.

I was asked for that by a group of retired service members some years ago. Confusing, too, because there's a distinction between 'dry ginger ale' and 'American ginger ale' in Britain, though it's rarer these days to find bars that carry both (generally in Schweppes or Britvic mini-bottles). The 'American ginger ale' is, I think, a bit closer to the old-style 'golden' ginger ales (Vernors) but not that close.

And yes, Whisky Macs are lovely, but wait until it gets cold again...
posted by holgate at 1:13 PM on April 26, 2007


slight derail here but captain morgan's + sprite = ginger ale

Weird note on ginger ale, should you run into a ginger-ale-less bar: 7-Up plus a finger of cola = passable "ginger ale."
posted by kmennie

though mixing rum + whisky + bitters + sprite would be interesting
posted by Lizc at 1:53 PM on April 26, 2007


I've always called it an old fashioned, but I can't remember if a bartender has ever known what I mean.
posted by dipolemoment at 4:52 PM on April 26, 2007


slight derail here but captain morgan's + sprite = ginger ale

Hmmm. Dark rum and ginger beer is a Dark and Stormy.
posted by weegreentoad at 6:21 PM on April 26, 2007


Dickie Ward sounds like something you'd get in prison. (Against your will at that.) That extra lime sounds delicious though.

I'm going to exercise my right to make this my drink. You guys are witnessing libational history in the making.

I like the Gilligan's Island; very clever, but it sounds like it should have a tiny umbrella with that name.

The Calvinist is a good name. Any other suggestions in this vein? Naughty Puritan? Probably something simpler...
Maybe a kirk?
A scotch baptist?

This list has some great ideas. How about a Bill Frist?

Maybe I'll just call it a Telf.
posted by Telf at 9:02 PM on April 26, 2007


Ooh... a Katherine Harris, a William Jennings Bryan, a John Foster Dulles, an Aaron Burr, a Sam Walton, a Condoleeza Rice.

All Presbyterians.
posted by Telf at 9:06 PM on April 26, 2007


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