quitting now or later???
May 3, 2012 3:57 PM   Subscribe

I just started a job at a finance leadership program at a Fortune 500 company. The program is extremely well known is 2 years long and is on the path to become an executive at this pretisgious company. I joined right after school ended (4 days) and never really had a strong inclination to go into finance. I knew that from the begining, while I know I do not want to stay there long-term as I am likley leaving after 2 years, I'd love to hear thoughts on whether I should leave the company now.

The job is extremley stressful (not in a fun way), and the work while not necessarily boring, is not interesting to me what so ever. I always wanted to try sales, but this job came up after I graduated so I took it without really thinking. There are pros and cons. There is no substitute for hard work ive only been there for 4 months and I realize having 2 years at this company and graduating from this program would look great on my resume. I also realize that no job is fun all the time (the grass is greener on the other side). I could always try to move into sales after I finish this program, but the question that bugs me is: why not just look for a sales jobs now then if that is the case as I know I likley will not stay in finance??? I have no contacts as well or other jobs readilly availible so quiting now would not make sense ... but should I nip this thought in the bud or explore further
posted by happydude123 to Work & Money (11 answers total)
 
I've only been there for 4 months and I realize having 2 years at this company and graduating from this program would look great on my resume.

The transition from college to work suuuuuuuuuuuucks. I'm serious, it's horrible. It is really hard. You don't get summers off, you don't get to go play in the park or the bar or the club whenever you want, you have to get up early like every day and wear uncomfortable clothes, and no one cares about your thoughts on anything, let alone about cool, fun shit like foreign films and logic problems. It's just...work.

I would deal with it by sticking out your leadership program, aggressively saving money/paying down debt (and I mean aggressive, like getting more roommates, living in a cheaper part of town, giving up your car if you have one, packing your lunch if that's acceptable in your office culture, cutting up your credit card or cards, going on staycation or working on side projects/jobs on your vacation days (if you can do it in a low-profile way), etc), and be a voracious learner at your job, then seeing where you are in two years. You're young, you can live tight for a while. It'll be worth it when you have sick amounts of cash on hand and can go sell vacation condos in Thailand or whatever.

Basically, the earlier in life you learn that you are a resourceful, determined person who can make the best of an imperfect situation, the better.

Plus, the economy also sucks right now. Hopefully, it's better in two years and that's when you move into a commission-based job. It would be horrible to jump to sales and then not make any money for six months, which is totally possible if you do enterprise.
posted by Snarl Furillo at 4:15 PM on May 3, 2012 [10 favorites]


The first two years as an analyst are hard wherever you go. Before you do anything, I strongly encourage you to share your feelings of ambivalence with an older mentor in your firm and perhaps a few of your colleagues. I'm sure you're aware that the gruelling, 18-hour workdays that consist of making powerpoints and spreadsheets doesn't last forever. If you hold your horses for two years, you'll most likely be entitled to a free MBA degree and a guaranteed exec position; if you hold out longer, you can leverage contacts you make to get a job in financial sales with great benefits. E.g., consider my aunt: she hated her first two years as an analyst at Goldman; after getting her MBA from Stanford paid for and completing her post-MBA service requirement, she went to work at a VC firm with one of her old analyst buddies and never looked back.

That said, if you care more about your short-term happiness than long-term benefits, I'd advise you to line up a backup job at your chosen company before you resign from your current position.
posted by lotusmish at 4:21 PM on May 3, 2012


Stick it out.
posted by mullacc at 4:36 PM on May 3, 2012 [1 favorite]


Stay with it. It's hard, and everyone knows it - that's part of the value for those who finish it. What you will get from sticking with it for the next year and a half will so outshadow the current hardship, that you'll look back later in life and laugh that you ever thought about leaving it early.
posted by NotMyselfRightNow at 5:35 AM on May 4, 2012


I assure you in no uncertain terms that 2 successful years at this company, no matter how boring or unstimulating, will pay pay untold dividends are your career progresses.

Half the battle in employment is getting your foot in the door. And having this company on your resume will open doors in the future that otherwise will never open for you -

BTW, having a successful finance background will only help your sales career. 3/4 of sales is understanding your numbers.
posted by lstanley at 6:25 AM on May 4, 2012 [1 favorite]


Dude, you are in the 1% of lucky grads who got a job right out of school in a great program, where you're mentored and taught. TOTALLY stay where you are.

I did sales for years, and it too is a grind. Plenty of time for that later. Plus, what you are learning now will be completely useful to you in sales. I got my MBA when I was working at The Phone Company, and while it was a complete waste of time as far as being applicable to my life in that moment, what I learned became incredibly useful down the road.

It's only two years, and once you've completed the program, you may get an opportunity to go into sales in your current company, or go into sales at really GOOD companies.

FYI, all of our sales people are CPAs. FWIW
posted by Ruthless Bunny at 7:07 AM on May 4, 2012


I agree with all your sentiments. I would never quit this job without looking for something that's equally of the same caliber so to speak. I don;t think I'll ever regreat knowing my debits and credits and like many have said this knowledge is useful later on. My question more was: Knowing that I tried finance, and that it is not for me, should I even consider looking for different jobs, or should I just focus on finishing the 2 years no matter what happens. This program for those that kno is the FMP program at General Electric. Very finance specialized.
posted by happydude123 at 11:10 AM on May 4, 2012


...should I even consider looking for different jobs, or should I just focus on finishing the 2 years no matter what happens.

I wouldn't leave the GE program early under any circumstance (except for like winning the lottery). By all means, spend some time thinking about and planning for your next move. But you can't guarantee that the next job will be the perfect thing. If you go looking for another job two or three years down the line, or if you're applying to business school, you'll regret having left the GE program early. People will question your judgment and work ethic if you couldn't stick out two years at such a good first job.

My own first job experience wasn't exactly the same, but close enough that I can be confident about your question. You can memail me if you want my story.
posted by mullacc at 11:50 AM on May 4, 2012 [1 favorite]


My question more was: Knowing that I tried finance, and that it is not for me, should I even consider looking for different jobs, or should I just focus on finishing the 2 years no matter what happens.

What I was trying to say above but I guess I didn't articulate completely was that I don't think you can say you truly tried this field after four months. It's just too early. It's not like school where a semester only lasts four-six months and at the end you know a lot more than at the beginning. Things might get more interesting as you learn more about what you are doing, and if they don't get more interesting, you might need the boring background to do the interesting stuff later.

The reason new grads get the advice to stay at their first job out of school for at least a year is because everyone feels the way you feel in the first six months. The next job is not going to be perfect. It's not going to be fascinating and self-directed with flexible hours. You just don't have any experience yet. You have to do the grunt work of this right now. There are times when it suuuuuuuuuuucks, I was not joking about that above or being facetious. It really does suck a lot of the time, but it's going to suck anywhere. The only way out of it is through it, as they say in AA.

People will question your judgment and work ethic if you couldn't stick out two years at such a good first job.

Yes. Exactly.
posted by Snarl Furillo at 12:16 PM on May 4, 2012


the FMP program at General Electric. Very finance specialized.

In 2011, GE was marked as the best place to build leaders in the world, so you are in the equivalent of the studying at an Ivy League, playing Major League Baseball, dating a supermodel, owning a Ferrari, or living in Biarritz. Or even all five at once.

You have it made, the door is open............... but only as long as you complete the program. 1,000 of resumes were received for your class of FMP employment, and you got in - take full advantage of this opportunity.

Do not underestimate the importance of General Electric Finance on your resume! Stick with it, and after your two years, the sky is the limit.

As mullac, my job experience has been close enough to yours that I can be confident about my answer to your question. You can memail me if you want my story as well. If you wanted advice, you've now heard it from two qualified horse's mouths.
posted by lstanley at 12:48 PM on May 4, 2012 [1 favorite]


Just popping in to say that you've won the lottery in terms of finding a first job out of college. Seriously, you might as well ask if you should rip up your winnings check and try to earn money in some other way.

Sure, it's going to suck. These kinds of opportunities start out very, very had and try to weed out those who can't or don't want to hack it. However, the two main factors in this program are: 1. getting in, and 2. sticking with it. You'll build a resume that will get immediate attention, find contacts you can use for the rest of your life, and I'll bet you'll start to like the industry more and more the longer you're in it.

DO. NOT. QUIT. THIS.

posted by xingcat at 10:45 AM on May 22, 2012


« Older Looking for the name of a stan...   |  We want to replace our Flip vi... Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.