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What are your favourite leftovers?
November 7, 2011 9:14 PM   Subscribe

What leftovers are better the next day than they were for the original meal?

I work a lot at home so I eat a lot of leftovers for lunch. Some things are much better the next day, imo - most roasted meats, home made sauces/bruschetta/hummus etc, cold boiled veg.

Then there are things that are horrible the next day - roasted veg, dressed salad, baked potatoes.

What I am looking for are leftovers that are going to be better than they were when served.

I realise everyone's tastes are different but looking for ideas. Thanks.
posted by fatmouse to Food & Drink (89 answers total) 72 users marked this as a favorite
 
Pretty much any sauce, soup, or stew. Especially tomato sauces. Things like chili. Anything where the flavors mingle and the texture is supposed to be glorpy.

Anything that's supposed to have a crisp texture (salad, the outsides of roasted veg, etc) or distinct flavors is going to be ruined.
posted by phunniemee at 9:18 PM on November 7, 2011 [16 favorites]


Indian food is perfect for this. My chana masala always is better the next day.
posted by bottlebrushtree at 9:18 PM on November 7, 2011 [6 favorites]


Most soups are going to be better the next day, as well as Mac and cheese, in my opinion.
posted by two lights above the sea at 9:19 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


Seconding chili and most stews and soups. I'm a big fan of leftover lasagna and pizza.
posted by Diagonalize at 9:21 PM on November 7, 2011


I don't eat it anymore but growing up, my favorite leftover meal was chicken pot pie. It was good when it was served fresh, but so much better the next day. If I were ever to eat meat again, it would be one of my mom's chicken pot pies, but a day old.
posted by MaryDellamorte at 9:23 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


I'd have to vote brisket.
posted by crapmatic at 9:25 PM on November 7, 2011


Don't forget the classic better-the-next-day food: pizza.
posted by katillathehun at 9:27 PM on November 7, 2011 [4 favorites]


Coq au vin rouge (which is secretly chicken stew, and there's an excellent recipe in the Joy of Cooking) is much better on the second day.
posted by gingerest at 9:31 PM on November 7, 2011


Snags.
posted by pompomtom at 9:33 PM on November 7, 2011


Specifically, Papa John's pizza. That's the one type of pizza I've always found better the next day.
posted by McCoy Pauley at 9:36 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


Eggplant Parmesan. Soooo good cold the next day. Chili definitely, because the spices and pepper mellow into the other ingredients. Almoat anything you make in a crockpot will be at least as good the second or third day as it was the day you made it, I've found.
posted by katyggls at 9:43 PM on November 7, 2011 [2 favorites]


Any curry.

Anything with liquid (sauce, stew, soup) that has a lot of herbs and spices in it, because they will infuse the liquid more overnight.

Boeuf bourgignon.

Anything cooked in wine, really...

Trifle.

Cakes with heavy glazes or sauces. E.g. those orange cakes where you pour a sticky orange liquid over the top when they are cooked.
posted by lollusc at 9:45 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


I thought of something else. Meatloaf, whether beef or turkey, makes amazing sandwiches the next day. Also macaroni or potato salad is as good or better the next day because the flavors blend.

Ok I'm done now I promise.
posted by katyggls at 9:46 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


brisket/roast/bourgignon
posted by ibakecake at 9:47 PM on November 7, 2011


Nthing stews. Also - lasagna, stuffed grape leaves, stuffed cabbage, and spinach pie.
posted by blurker at 9:47 PM on November 7, 2011


Nthing chili! And lasagne.
posted by smilingtiger at 9:49 PM on November 7, 2011


Yes yes yes to meatloaf! Also, add take-out Chinese food to the list.
posted by blurker at 9:49 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


Bolognese. Specifically, the bolognese I made last night, and which was amazing, and which I am going to eat again when I get home, because today in the fridge has caused it to be even amazing-er.

Roasted chicken from a whole roast chook is always better cold than it was when it was hot. It is the only standalone flesh product that is good the next day, things like steaks and chops and other roasts are bad and wrong. A concession may be made for corned beef but only on sandwiches.

All soups and stews, near as I can tell. Stuff like ossobucco Certainly chilli. I make the world's most incredible salsa/bruschetta (whatever you want to call it) and it only really comes out in force after a minimum 48 hours standing in the fridge.

Pizza is never better the next day, I don't understand what these crazy people above me are talking about. Opened cans of bully beef also do not become magically more delicious overnight in the fridge. Shake 'n' mix things of pancake batter are terrible also, the solids separate from the liquid and it looks like dental effluvia. Also if you think "I'll save this half an onion" then there's something wrong with you, either use the whole onion or buy a smaller onion next time or just don't have onion at all. Fridge onion is the worst.
posted by tumid dahlia at 9:51 PM on November 7, 2011 [4 favorites]


As we head into the Thanksgiving season, I feel we have to mention the fact that the full spread of turkey dinner (turkey, stuffing, mashed potato and cranberry sauce) makes a KILLER Black Friday sandwich.
posted by Rock Steady at 9:51 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


Oh yes, curry. Next-day curry is the best. Unless it has coriander in it, in which case I heat it to lava and throw it into crowds.
posted by tumid dahlia at 9:53 PM on November 7, 2011


...the outsides of roasted veg...

I don't know who you are that you're just eating the outsides of roasted vegetables but leftover potatoes from the Sunday roast make awesome sandwiches.
posted by tumid dahlia at 9:55 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


Yeah, tumid dahlia is right. Pizza is good cold, but it's not better.

Also if you think "I'll save this half an onion" then there's something wrong with you, either use the whole onion or buy a smaller onion next time or just don't have onion at all. Fridge onion is the worst.

Oh my yes. My wife does this constantly and I always find 3 or 4 manky half-onions in the fridge when I clean it out. They're not that expensive! Buy another one!
posted by Rock Steady at 9:56 PM on November 7, 2011


Oh, and also sausages. Cold sausages in sandwiches. YUM.
posted by lollusc at 10:00 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


Bolognese as was said above; or more broadly, any tomato-meat sauce. So gooooood.
posted by fingersandtoes at 10:07 PM on November 7, 2011


Larb---Thai ground chicken (or whatever) salad in a dressing of fish sauce, molto lime juice, chilis, chili powder, scallions, palm sugar. Garnished with mint and cilantro, served with a wedge of cabbage for scooping.
posted by TheRedArmy at 10:11 PM on November 7, 2011


Lasagna. Of course I'm thinking of the Stauffer's veggie lasagna my mom used to buy, and I always looked forward to eating it cold the next day. I like recipes that imitate it.
posted by DoubleLune at 10:11 PM on November 7, 2011


This is a bit of a cheat, since you still have to cook it, but fried rice is only good if made with leftover rice.
posted by Diagonalize at 10:13 PM on November 7, 2011 [6 favorites]


Almost anything that is made with cheese, and especially anything made with cheese AND spinach.
posted by DisreputableDog at 10:23 PM on November 7, 2011


Tiramisu!
posted by jbenben at 10:25 PM on November 7, 2011


borscht
posted by 5_13_23_42_69_666 at 10:29 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


Kraft macaroni and cheese. Not sure about other macaroni and cheese.
posted by matlock expressway at 10:30 PM on November 7, 2011


Chili. Oh my god, chili. I have made an entire pot of chili and stuck it in the fridge for the night to eat the next day.

Shepherd's Pie, too. Don't have a specific recipe to link, sorry. ):
posted by Heretical at 10:34 PM on November 7, 2011


Risotto -- but you have to be willing to heat it up. Cold isn't nearly as tasty as warm.
posted by zagyzebra at 10:36 PM on November 7, 2011


Jambalaya. The rice soaks everything up, the flavors mingle...gets better for about four days, actually.
posted by Joseph Gurl at 10:44 PM on November 7, 2011 [2 favorites]


I think if you look at what's been written it's obvious what IS better the next day. Figuring out what isn't is the trick.

For me, chicken that doesn't have a sauce or over whelming flavor (smoked, bbq), basically plain chicken, is awful the next day.

as well as Mac and cheese

This depends on the mac and cheese. The mac and cheese I use has a very creamy cheese sauce. The next day the creaminess is gone, and re-heating it does nothing. It's edible, but not near as tasty.
posted by justgary at 10:51 PM on November 7, 2011


Cold eggplant parmesan. And every time I eat it, I hear my mother say "You'd better heat that up!"
posted by atomicmedia at 11:00 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


Pizza is not better the next day. It's good, but not better.
posted by jimmythefish at 11:13 PM on November 7, 2011


If you make a big pot of pho stock from bones, pho is pretty much always better the days after you first cook it.
posted by surenoproblem at 11:28 PM on November 7, 2011


What about leftovers that can be reused to make something even better? Any kind of cooked potato and meat can be turned into an awesome hash the next day. It's a reason to boil more potatoes and corned beef than you could stand otherwise.
posted by WasabiFlux at 11:38 PM on November 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


A good lasagne is good as soon as it comes out of the oven, and at least as good in a different way after maturing overnight in the fridge.

Same goes for a good curry.
posted by flabdablet at 11:42 PM on November 7, 2011


Black forest cake is best if left for a few days, but only if it's real black forest cake.
posted by A Thousand Baited Hooks at 11:57 PM on November 7, 2011


What about leftovers that can be reused to make something even better?

Just recently I shared my favorite omelette, super thin egg and stuffed with mashed potatoes and cheese.

Matzo Brei. (I'm sorry that I linked to a Ruth Reichl recipe because I can't stand her, but this is closest to my childhood. The use of butter is not kosher - but you can adapt this...)

The first thing that came to mind when I read this question?

After Thanksgiving I like to make a mash of turkey, mashed potatoes, and stuffing - all moistened with gravy. It's not pretty, I know. But I love it. I'm ok with using the cranberry to accent, but not too much. Adding in green beens or sweet potato really ruins it. I'm a purist.

That is my favorite leftover meal. it comes once a year, and I plan for it!
posted by jbenben at 12:09 AM on November 8, 2011


Fish! Hot freshly cooked fish right out of the pan or off the BBQ is great but chilled cooked salmon is something altogether different and wonderful the next day.
For a post-Thanksgiving or post-Christmas breakfast, toast liberally slathered with cranberry sauce and topped with cold sliced turkey with cold stuffing on the side.
The classic diner favorite, hot (turkey, roast beef, pork or chicken) sandwiches swimming in reheated gravy.
Fried rice made from last night's leftover rice.
Cold fritatta.
Cold fried chicken (not KFC).
posted by islander at 12:45 AM on November 8, 2011


You can do glorious things with thanksgiving turkey leftovers.
Take the carcass and throw in a carrot/onion/rib of celery with some salt and pepper and make a delicious broth.
Use this broth with leftover turkey and some more veggies to make a pot pie.
If you cut up too many veggies for the pot pie, save them and use them to make turkey fried rice.
posted by that girl at 1:25 AM on November 8, 2011


in my experience, only mediocre pizza is better the next day
posted by Greener Backyards at 1:37 AM on November 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


Does Filipino food count? Adobo is famous for a) keeping well even without refrigeration, and b) for tasting better the longer it is kept.
posted by micketymoc at 2:43 AM on November 8, 2011


This carrot salad (which doesn't require grating carrots or eating them with raisins) is far better after an overnight in the fridge.

Moroccan Carrot Salad
Derived from “Joan Nathan’s Jewish Holiday Cookbook”

2 pounds carrots
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons paprika
Hot pepper to taste
1 tablespoon cumin (I use a combination of ground and whole)
1⁄2 cup lemon juice
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley
1 glug olive oil

Peel the carrots and boil in water for about 20 minutes, or until just tender. Cool and cut into thin rounds.

Put carrots in a bowl and add the rest of the ingredients, except parsley and oil.

Refrigerate until cold. Before serving, add parsley and oil.
posted by sciencegeek at 2:50 AM on November 8, 2011 [6 favorites]


tomato sauce has been mentioned, but I once had a partner that would not eat the pasta portion until it had been aged in the fridge at least a day.

I personally don't like to eat steak fresh but I really like it sliced cold on sandwiches. Roast chicken is good that way too.

Baked potatoes are horrible the next day? Not if you dice them up and fry them with veggies as hash browns. Don't forget the turmeric.
posted by telstar at 3:13 AM on November 8, 2011


coleslaw and potato salad are both better the next day, and coleslaw in particular is good if you want to add some veggies to your lunch routine. There are tons of variations on coleslaw that vary the seasonings and the raw vegetables involved (carrots and broccoli also make good slaw, for example).
posted by drlith at 3:15 AM on November 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


Burritos are awesome the next day! Especially cold. The cheese has melted, the flavors have all combined and the rice has a great texture to it. I suggest you make them Chipotle style, wrap them in aluminum foil and just leave them in the fridge overnight.

I am one of the crazy people who thinks pizza is often better the next day. And not just the 99% pizza, but also the luxury 1% pizza.

Pasta, in many cases, is better the next day. Again, you have a soft carbohydrate that's absorbing all of the sauce, spices and cheese. Did I mention cheese? My mom used to make an awesome dish called slop (which made my cousin cry when he was 6 and found out he was having slop for dinner at Aunt Karen's house). You take penne or bow tie pasta, cook it, throw it into a pyrex bowl with plenty of spaghetti sauce, any spices or extra garlic, mozzarrella cheese and parmesean cheese and let it cook covered on 300 degrees until it's bubbling. The flavors mix together and the leftovers are (kisses fingers like an Irishman pretending to be an Italian chef).

Great question!
posted by glaucon at 3:25 AM on November 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


Pizza is not better the next day. It's good, but not better

that entirely depends on the kind of hangover you have
posted by 5_13_23_42_69_666 at 3:29 AM on November 8, 2011 [3 favorites]


Kimchee gets better the older it gets. With kimchee refrigerator technology I recently ate 1 year old kimchee. SOOO GOOOD *drooool*
posted by like_neon at 4:09 AM on November 8, 2011


Pasta salad. With peppers and onions and cajun sausage and a red wine vinaigrette. Mmmmm.
posted by specialagentwebb at 4:21 AM on November 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


Chilli is so much better the next day that for a special occasion I purposely make it the day before.
posted by jb at 4:49 AM on November 8, 2011


Pretty much any spicy meat-based stew, certainly curry, chilli, I often make these in quantity, both to stand overnight before eating and to freeze.

Things with cheese sauce in them do not benefit from keeping in my experience and the idea of making, say, macaroni cheese to eat the following day just seems wierd.
posted by epo at 4:59 AM on November 8, 2011


Trifle is better the next day, even better the day after that, and so on, right until the point where the berries start to turn.
posted by coppermoss at 5:45 AM on November 8, 2011


Homemade fried rice! We tend to make it a day earlier than we want to eat it specifically so we can get the deliciousness of the leftovers.
posted by peanut_mcgillicuty at 5:57 AM on November 8, 2011


Chicken etouffé is great after a couple of days in the fridge. But not cold.
posted by slogger at 6:01 AM on November 8, 2011


Almost any stew, as others have said, because the flavors mix together better. Rougher components also become a bit more tender. But there's a limit:

One of my favorite dishes is Cassoulet. For our purposes basically sausage-duck-white bean stew. I noticed that it was always much better the next day so we would make it the day before instead. What about 2 days? 3 days? I decided to test this and these were my notes/findings:

Day 0: Day it was made. It is tasty but the individual flavors are too well-defined. You are either taking a bit of rich sausage or of blander beans. Good but not great.

Day 1: The flavors have mixed together and it is much better. The stronger flavors of the duck and sausage are now in the beans and stew, making everything richer. The beans are tender without being mushy.

Day 2: Everything has gotten even better! The same notes from Day 1 apply. The whole thing is a rich, well-balanced stew. Delicious. What if I leave some for tomorrow?

Day 3: Dissapointment. The flavors seem faded. The beans are officially mushy and the whole thing is approaching a baby sauce - somewhat tasty but too even with no complexity or undertones to the flavors.

So there you have it. Two days after cooking for Cassoulet. This may be a different amount for other types of stews.

By the way, the Day 3 effect is why canned stews (including Cassoulets in jars) always taste bland. The ingredients may have been top-shelf but they have been mixing for far too long.
posted by vacapinta at 6:03 AM on November 8, 2011 [4 favorites]


There are two things I make in order to put them in the fridge at least overnight: lasagna and enchiladas (corn tortillas dipped in canned enchilada sauce, rolled up with whatever fillings you like - cheese, beans, meat, placed in a casserole dish, then topped with the remaining sauce and cheese, bake at 350F until hot through and bubbly).

Vegetarian Times had an article a couple years ago with a list of freezer casserole type meals that we refer to frequently. One of the dishes on the list was a root veggie shepherds pie that is fantastic.
posted by LyndsayMW at 6:04 AM on November 8, 2011


Here is a link to the VT article.
posted by LyndsayMW at 6:05 AM on November 8, 2011


Fried pizza... turn pizza upside in some olive oil
posted by MangyCarface at 6:16 AM on November 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


62 answers and nobody's mentioned chicken cutlets? Sure, they're fantastic for dinner with a squirt of fresh lemon over them - but the next day, on a hard roll with a little mayo, lettuce and whatever? Fantastic. Or, you know - as a midnight snack, standing over the sink... Here's a recipe that's close enough to mine.
posted by peagood at 6:23 AM on November 8, 2011


Three bean salad or similar (beans dressed in a vinagrette with some sugar, basically; it's good on day one, DELICIOUS on day two, good on day three, and then runs rapidly downhill. But day two is the key.)

Ham soup is particularly delicious on day two or later

Baked potatoes are pretty good on day two if you eat all the guts out, save the skin for day two, and eat the skin reheated with some cheese melted on it. (I usually can't finish a "big" baked potato all at once, so I eat the guts, which are indeed gross on day two, and save the skin.)

There's this one pasta I make that's dressed with pesto and goat cheese, and I adore it on the second day because it's SO GOOD COLD. Although I suppose I'd just have to stick it in the fridge a few hours to get it that way, but that seems like cheating.

Cold steak for breakfast is why God gave us super-giant steaks at restaurants, so you can take enough home to eat cold the next day at breakfast.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 6:49 AM on November 8, 2011


oh man, Goulash is so much better the longer it sits. I even knew people in the Czech Republic who would ask waiters when the goulash was made...

and they'd order something else if the waiter told them the goulash had been made on the same day.
posted by FunGus at 7:05 AM on November 8, 2011


62 answers and nobody's mentioned chicken cutlets?

I don't know, I've had bad luck with leftover chicken, it frequently gets dried out and tastes like leftovers. I wouldn't say leftover chicken is universally better the next day.
posted by cabingirl at 7:09 AM on November 8, 2011


62 answers and nobody's mentioned chicken cutlets?

How do you keep the chicken from acquiring that gamey left-in-the-fridge taste?
posted by Inspector.Gadget at 7:19 AM on November 8, 2011 [2 favorites]


Baked Ziti. ZOMG so good as leftovers.
posted by contessa at 7:20 AM on November 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


I'll add red beans and rice, home made baked beans, and pulled pork to the list.
posted by fimbulvetr at 7:20 AM on November 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


What are you doing with the baked potatoes that make them worse the next day? I chop up left over baked potatoes and make great home friends.
posted by hworth at 7:30 AM on November 8, 2011


Anything curry. Cold pizza for breakfast. Most soups. Cold roast beef (in sandwiches with cold gravy). I prefer steamed rice the second day, reheated with butter and soy sauce in the microwave. Cold sausages in sandwiches with brown sauce, have to be Brat style not US breakfast sausages.

Also to reuse roast veg or potatoes I like to make "Bubble & Squeak" that's not a traditional recipe it's usually made with cabbage but I don't like cabbage. Just put in any meat or veg leftovers or some bacon or whatever and go for it. Best use of leftovers ever.
posted by wwax at 7:33 AM on November 8, 2011


Braised anything. Next-day braised short ribs with fried eggs and rice for breakfast is like a delicious meaty christmas present.
posted by AceRock at 9:18 AM on November 8, 2011


Some breads. I just did James Beard's sourdough rye, and it's good fresh, but the crust, as it gets a little stale, is crispier and flakier, and the bread itself gains the right amount of tooth.

Dolmas.

Home made mayonaise, especially if there's dill or something in it. I've said before and I'll say it again. People who don't like mayonaise just haven't had the real thing. It's so much better than anything you can buy, and people think you're a wizard for making it from scratch, but it's not difficult at all if you have a mixer and only slightly physically taxing if you don't. I use Alton Brown's recipe with a little more mustard and a little less oil for a more solid texture.

Also if you think "I'll save this half an onion" then there's something wrong with you, either use the whole onion or buy a smaller onion next time or just don't have onion at all. Fridge onion is the worst.

What? Just seal it up in something and slice off the thinnest slice from the cut end that you can if it's been more than a day or two. And use it before you've started accumulating onion-ends, of course.
posted by cmoj at 9:47 AM on November 8, 2011


Chinese food! (Take out, I mean.) I'll eat a little hot, but most of it goes right in the fridge to get all cold and yummy.
posted by pyjammy at 10:28 AM on November 8, 2011


Sciencegeek's recipe for carrot salad is a sister to one of my potluck standbys: Moroccan Carrots, which I found in the "New York Cookbook" by Molly O'Neill. You must make it at least two days prior, to allow for marination.

Also good for letting sit in the fridge is pickled red onions, which I got from Moosewood.
posted by computech_apolloniajames at 10:50 AM on November 8, 2011


Seconding tiramisu, adobo, and adding: pound cake (best at two or even three days later!), carrot cake, and pineapple upside down cake.
posted by pimli at 11:38 AM on November 8, 2011


biryani
posted by abdulf at 11:53 AM on November 8, 2011


I am one of the crazy people who thinks pizza is often better the next day.

And by "one of those crazy people" you mean "one of ... most people"? I mean, you don't even have to look further than THIS THREAD. If you want to be a special snowflake, you have to try a little harder than that.
posted by dagnyscott at 12:53 PM on November 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


Most pies are way better cold & out of the fridge than fresh. Cold cherry pie YUM
posted by jabes at 12:53 PM on November 8, 2011


If Cuban food counts, definitely arroz con pollo.
posted by Adultivity at 5:06 PM on November 8, 2011


Wow - fantastic responses and am particularly intrigued by the adobo and arroz con pollo and the carrot salads - not forgetting the cakes.

The cold pizza wars leave me, errr, cold as if it's a good pizza there's unlikely to be leftovers and if its not good, cold and age doesn't improve it (for me).

Lots of 'best answers' as they're all the ones I will be trying.

Surprised cold lamb on the bone isn't on there - would be my number 1 pick.

Thanks all
posted by fatmouse at 5:52 PM on November 8, 2011


Oh and for the onion thing - we freeze ours and chuck them in the next stock pot.
posted by fatmouse at 5:53 PM on November 8, 2011


62 answers and nobody's mentioned chicken cutlets?

I don't know, I've had bad luck with leftover chicken, it frequently gets dried out and tastes like leftovers. I wouldn't say leftover chicken is universally better the next day.

How do you keep the chicken from acquiring that gamey left-in-the-fridge taste?

Because they're cutlets! It's white breast meat, sliced thin, covered in a delicious moist breaded coating and cooked just until golden and done. Stored properly (layers of paper towel in tupperware), there's no reason it would dry out or acquire any taste. It's better because the breaded coating soaks up any condiments (especially a garlic or spicy mayo, or a red sauce and mozzarella); and using a breast cooked that way is nicer and more proportionate than deli meat (and probably less dry than slices of leftover roasted chicken or turkey) in a sandwich.
posted by peagood at 4:08 AM on November 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


Reheated mac and cheese is way better in quality if you stir in a little milk before you nuke it.
posted by Andrhia at 6:11 AM on November 9, 2011


Inspired by this thread, I made some adobo last night and am looking forward to leftovers for lunch. I'll also add that pretty much any kind of soup/stew with soy sauce seems better after sitting overnight.
posted by monju_bosatsu at 6:33 AM on November 9, 2011


I made a stroganoff on Saturday, and had leftovers last night. It was good to start, but great the second time around.

Cold/reheated pizza is vastly inferior to fresh. The crust gets all funky and the cheese loses its flavor and the texture goes all gummy and ...
posted by owtytrof at 7:49 AM on November 9, 2011


my mothers chicken and dumplings
posted by iondiode at 11:06 AM on November 9, 2011


Rum cake is awesome when it's fresh but a revelation when it's had time to steep. I use something similar to this recipe (except make sure you stab the cake with a skewer prior to glazing, so the glaze really gets incorporated into the cake. And make twice the amount of glaze called for.)
posted by punchtothehead at 6:35 PM on November 9, 2011


Okay, I have to add this since I made it the other day and then had it as leftovers for lunch and dinner yesterday. Sooooo good because the corn tortillas kind of soaked in the juices and it became tamale-like. Yum! (I modified this recipe by using a pack of taco seasoning and corn instead of flour tortillas.)

Quesadilla Casserole
posted by pyjammy at 1:30 PM on November 10, 2011


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