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compromised site loses favorite recipe
October 23, 2011 12:53 PM   Subscribe

How to get a favorite recipe for rajma chaval from Tiffin Tales? My favorite recipe for a red bean curry is now showing up as "this site may harm your computer" in google and is no longer in the google cache. The admin and blog author emails now bounce. Wayback machine does not archive it. No blog-scraping site has copied it. Other recipes online seem quite different. Is there anything else I am forgetting?

The original URL is this one - I did not add a direct link, so no one blindly clicks on it:

www. tiffintales. com/2010/05/30/indian-comfort-food-rajma-chaval-red-bean-curry-with-rice/

There must be some way I can get it back!

I'll settle for a new recipe if you have a good one to recommend...
posted by whatzit to Computers & Internet (9 answers total) 18 users marked this as a favorite
 
I pulled it down with Lynx. Here you go. Also, this looks delicious!

Rajma
Recipe adapted from my mother’s kitchen
(Serves 2-3)

1 cup red kidney beans
2 tablespoon salted butter
1 medium onion finely chopped (or grated)
3/4 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste (you can get this in an Indian store
or make your own by processing chopped ginger and garlic in a processor
with a little water, or just use grated ginger and garlic)
1 medium tomato chopped
1/2 cup tomato paste
1 teaspoon cumin (jeera)
1 teaspoon coriander powder (dhania)
1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder (haldi)
1/2 teaspoon (or as per taste) red chilli powder (lal mirch)
1 teaspoon garam masala
Salt, to taste
1 teaspoon lemon juice (optional)
A few sprigs of fresh coriander or parsley (optional)

1. Soak the beans in 3 cups of water overnight. (I cheated this time
because I wanted to eat this now, I used canned beans; if doing this,
skip this step)
2. Rinse the beans and cook them in 4 cups of fresh water and salt
until completely cooked and tender. 3. Using a pressure cooker to do
this, as is the traditional way, makes it a lot easier. The time will
depend on the beans you use. In a pressure cooker, it takes about 20-30
mins. (If using canned beans, skip this step.)
4. Melt 1 ½ tablespoon butter over medium heat in a heavy bottomed pan.
Add the onions and fry until they turn golden brown.
5. Add the ginger-garlic paste and fry for 2-3 mins.
6. Add the chopped tomato, tomato paste and all the spices except the
garam masala. Cook till everything comes together and turns into a dark
reddish brown color.
7. Add the beans, ½ cup water (use the water in which you cooked the
beans), garam masala, and salt and mix well (don’t stir too much). (The
amount of water you use will determine the thickness of your curry. I
like mine really thick; if you would like it to be thinner, use more
water.)
8. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pan and simmer for 15-20 mins,
stirring occasionally. The beans should become one with the curry but
not turn to mush.
9. Add in the remaining butter (optional), sprinkle lemon juice over,
garnish with coriander. Serve hot over steamed rice.

P.S. This curry, like almost all Indian curries, tastes even better the
next day. I make it early in the day to serve for dinner.
P.P.S. I might sound ridiculous, but one trick I often use if my
tomatoes are too tangy or acidic (especially if I’ve been lazy and used
canned tomato paste) is to add a scant ¼ teaspoon of sugar. Yes, it
sounds weird, but I’ve found it nicely balances the acidity of the
tomatoes. Just don’t tell anyone there’s sugar in your curry.

Steamed Rice
(This rice turns out perfectly for me each time)
Recipe adapted from my mother’s kitchen
(Serves 2-3)

1 cup basmati rice
3/4 tablespoon oil
2 cups water

1. Soak the rice in hot water for an hour.
2. Add oil to a heavy bottomed pot or pan.
3. Add the rice and 2 cups of water (you can use the same water you
soaked the rice in) and stir.
4. Cover and cook the rice over medium-low heat. After 10 mins, give it
a gentle stir with a spoon. Cover and cook further for 5-7 mins.
Uncover and cook to evaporate remaining liquid, if any.
posted by jquinby at 12:58 PM on October 23, 2011 [8 favorites]


Is it this?

Rajma
Recipe adapted from my mother’s kitchen
(Serves 2-3)

1 cup red kidney beans
2 tablespoon salted butter
1 medium onion finely chopped (or grated)
3/4 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste (you can get this in an Indian store or make your own by processing chopped ginger and garlic in a processor with a little water, or just use grated ginger and garlic)
1 medium tomato chopped
1/2 cup tomato paste
1 teaspoon cumin (jeera)
1 teaspoon coriander powder (dhania)
1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder (haldi)
1/2 teaspoon (or as per taste) red chilli powder (lal mirch)
1 teaspoon garam masala
Salt, to taste
1 teaspoon lemon juice (optional)
A few sprigs of fresh coriander or parsley (optional)

1. Soak the beans in 3 cups of water overnight. (I cheated this time because I wanted to eat this now, I used canned beans; if doing this, skip this step)
2. Rinse the beans and cook them in 4 cups of fresh water and salt until completely cooked and tender. 3. Using a pressure cooker to do this, as is the traditional way, makes it a lot easier. The time will depend on the beans you use. In a pressure cooker, it takes about 20-30 mins. (If using canned beans, skip this step.)
4. Melt 1 ½ tablespoon butter over medium heat in a heavy bottomed pan. Add the onions and fry until they turn golden brown.
5. Add the ginger-garlic paste and fry for 2-3 mins.
6. Add the chopped tomato, tomato paste and all the spices except the garam masala. Cook till everything comes together and turns into a dark reddish brown color.
7. Add the beans, ½ cup water (use the water in which you cooked the beans), garam masala, and salt and mix well (don’t stir too much). (The amount of water you use will determine the thickness of your curry. I like mine really thick; if you would like it to be thinner, use more water.)
8. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pan and simmer for 15-20 mins, stirring occasionally. The beans should become one with the curry but not turn to mush.
9. Add in the remaining butter (optional), sprinkle lemon juice over, garnish with coriander. Serve hot over steamed rice.

P.S. This curry, like almost all Indian curries, tastes even better the next day. I make it early in the day to serve for dinner.
P.P.S. I might sound ridiculous, but one trick I often use if my tomatoes are too tangy or acidic (especially if I’ve been lazy and used canned tomato paste) is to add a scant ¼ teaspoon of sugar. Yes, it sounds weird, but I’ve found it nicely balances the acidity of the tomatoes. Just don’t tell anyone there’s sugar in your curry.

Steamed Rice
(This rice turns out perfectly for me each time)
Recipe adapted from my mother’s kitchen
(Serves 2-3)

1 cup basmati rice
3/4 tablespoon oil
2 cups water

1. Soak the rice in hot water for an hour.
2. Add oil to a heavy bottomed pot or pan.
3. Add the rice and 2 cups of water (you can use the same water you soaked the rice in) and stir.
4. Cover and cook the rice over medium-low heat. After 10 mins, give it a gentle stir with a spoon. Cover and cook further for 5-7 mins. Uncover and cook to evaporate remaining liquid, if any.
posted by AwkwardPause at 12:59 PM on October 23, 2011


ooo good idea. I knew someone would see something that I hadn't thought to do. You are kitchen-heros.
posted by whatzit at 1:00 PM on October 23, 2011


I just pasted the link into my browser's address bar, and it worked fine. No need to go through Google when you have a URL.

Thanks for the recipe, too!
posted by amtho at 1:15 PM on October 23, 2011


Ummm, yes, thanks for internet 101! When my browser (Chrome) and then google (hence going to google) both indicate that the site may compromise my computer, I hesitate to proceed further without protection.
posted by whatzit at 1:19 PM on October 23, 2011


Possibly unnecessary suggestion: I make something very similar to this (chicken pathia) and I add brown rather than white sugar.
posted by humph at 1:30 PM on October 23, 2011


You can download the page via Lynx (and perhaps by other text-only browsers) and avoid any risks posed by javascript and whatnot. I did the following:

lynx --dump (url)

...and redirected output to a text file. You get all the content, though (obviously) not any of the images. Lynx is available on a variety of platforms and is still pretty darned useful for stuff like this.
posted by jquinby at 1:31 PM on October 23, 2011 [5 favorites]


I pulled it down with Lynx.

You magnificent bastard.
posted by obiwanwasabi at 4:42 PM on October 23, 2011


Sorry, I wasn't sure of your experience level, and I've seen a whole bunch of people think that they are supposed to put all web addresses into Google search.
posted by amtho at 11:22 PM on October 23, 2011


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