Should I provide a W-2 to a potential new employer?
February 15, 2011 7:05 PM   Subscribe

Should I provide a W-2 to a potential new employer? A job offer was made to me pending a background check. The background check is delayed because my current employer has not replied to the new employer(I do not know why). I was given the option to verify employment using a W-2 form. Do I want to give all of this information to the new employer? I didn't lie about salary but never gave a direct amount. The new job is a 15% increase and I feel like I should not make that obvious to the new employer. If I never stated or lied about a my current salary am I worried about this for no reason? Is 15% going to be perfectly acceptable to them if I am the right candidate?
posted by anonymous to Work & Money (14 answers total)
 
Black out the parts you don't want them to see and then give them the W2.
posted by geoff. at 7:07 PM on February 15, 2011 [8 favorites]


geoff. has it.
posted by ottereroticist at 7:10 PM on February 15, 2011


If you go geoff.'s route, make sure to black it out and photocopy it (or scan it, black it out with mspaint or something, and email it), because you can definitely make out printed ink through sharpie.
posted by phunniemee at 7:11 PM on February 15, 2011 [2 favorites]


As long as you didn't lie about your current salary, I wouldn't worry about anything. If I were hiring someone I would expect that they would be getting a pay increase.
posted by radioamy at 7:15 PM on February 15, 2011


A 15% increase when changing jobs is not at all a big leap. I wouldn't worry about it.
posted by dejah420 at 7:18 PM on February 15, 2011


Your employer is not permitted to give them salary information so I can't see why you should have any hesitation about blacking out the amounts on the W2. Follow geoff's and phunniemee's advice.
posted by Anitanola at 7:23 PM on February 15, 2011


Frankly, the hassle and risk of changing employers is such that anything less than 15 percent looks suspiciously like quitting before they fire you. But asking for your w2 to confirm salary is pretty damn tacky IMO. Sharpie + photocopy sounds like a good solution, but keep in mind that many of the tax related fields are directly calculated from salary.
posted by pwnguin at 7:33 PM on February 15, 2011


Do they want to see the W-2 or make a copy of it? I'd be happy to SHOW one to a new employer, but they certainly cannot keep a copy of it or otherwise take notes.
posted by lefty lucky cat at 7:42 PM on February 15, 2011


Employers are NOT prohibited from giving out salary information, if they want to. Almost none do.

Black out the numbers and let 'em run with it. They (if they aren't lying) are just trying to verify that you worked for who you say you did.
posted by gjc at 8:58 PM on February 15, 2011 [1 favorite]


You've already been made an offer at a rate that they believe you are worth. As a sometimes hiring manager, if you spent more than a year at your previous job, I'd expect you to get a 15%-20% bump for jumping.

As long as you didn't lie about your salary history, just give them the W2.
posted by Gucky at 9:09 PM on February 15, 2011


I've made many employment offers. As they've already made you an offer with the extra 15% I would be completely amazed if they tried to rescind that offer when they see what you were making as your previous job. If someone did that to me I would thank my lucky stars that I learned they were complete assholes before I started working for them and tell them to stick their job where the sun don't shine.

I wouldn't bother with the blackout routine because that would imply you have something to hide when you really don't. If I were the hiring manager I'd be asking "why he do this?"
posted by Long Way To Go at 10:24 PM on February 15, 2011 [1 favorite]


If I were the hiring manager I'd be asking "why he do this?"

If I were the employee, I'd be asking "why['d] they ask me for this?". So it all works out.
posted by jrockway at 3:54 AM on February 16, 2011


At my shop, a raise of 15% to take a new job wouldn't even be worth noting. No one here would blink. I also think redacting your details from the W-2 would be acceptable, although I wouldn't bother in your shoes.
posted by Lame_username at 6:45 AM on February 16, 2011


If I were the employee, I'd be asking "why['d] they ask me for this?". So it all works out.

It clear why they're asking for it. They are verifying what you told them in your interview when they asked you you previous salary. There's nothing wrong with that. I've always asked that question. People unwilling to answer it don't get an offer. For those that do answer I verify by asking for pay slips or W2's. In my case I don't want to offer substantially more than they were earning previously. I want them to come work for me because they're interested in the work we're doing and for the other non-monetary perks. Hiring people who are solely interested in money is a waste of my time, they will just jump ship to the next job willing to offer more money.
posted by Long Way To Go at 5:06 PM on February 16, 2011


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