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Quitting first job after 2 weeks, do I tell potential employers?
June 12, 2010 3:57 PM   Subscribe

I just graduated and got my first job. It's outside of the city and the commute is much longer than I anticipated (and the salary is much lower than standard, and I generally dislike it...), so I'm looking for a closer (and better) job. Since I've only been working for a few weeks, do I mention my current job to any potential employers?

I graduated in May and started work soon after, so it's just been two weeks since I started. I know I can't list anyone at my current job as a reference, but do I even add it to my resume? I'm a science major trying to break into software engineering, and my current job involves a lot of programming. Would it be more helpful to explain this to interviewers, or to just leave it out entirely? I don't want to look flakey, like someone who can't hold a job down for more than a few weeks.

Also, if the advice is to leave it off entirely: it's my understanding that I'm still in the phase where I can be considered a "recent grad," so a two-week gap in my work history between graduation and now probably won't draw much attention, right?
posted by anonymous to Work & Money (8 answers total)
 
IMHO no need to mention it.
posted by ericb at 4:00 PM on June 12, 2010


If you get a new job, just forget this one.
posted by fifilaru at 4:01 PM on June 12, 2010


a two-week gap in my work history between graduation and now probably won't draw much attention, right?

Yes, I wouldn't worry here at all.
posted by SpacemanStix at 4:02 PM on June 12, 2010


I don't want to look flakey, like someone who can't hold a job down for more than a few weeks.

Then don't reveal that.
posted by halogen at 4:10 PM on June 12, 2010


Well, keep working there til you find another job. If you get to 3 months at your current job then you should list it.

Also what kind of programming are you doing?
posted by Joe Chip at 4:24 PM on June 12, 2010


I disagree with the previous responses. Many employers look for 'employability' in candidates. The fact you have recently been selected for employment shows that someone sees value in you as an employee. This speaks volumes in a job application, regardless of the length of employment. You have very valid reasons for leaving your current job and I'm sure they'll be understood.
posted by brockerst at 4:47 PM on June 12, 2010


I'd list it, because it will improve your negotiating position on salary. If you don't list it, they'll assume you're unemployed which either means "unemployable", or can be employed cheaply. Neither of which are things you want.
posted by pwnguin at 8:16 PM on June 12, 2010


On balance, I would say to leave it off. The problem with including it is that any potential employer will want to know why you're leaving. If you can't give an adequate explanation, that may reflect poorly on you. And if you can give an adequate explanation (the commute, the poor pay), they may use that against you in that they feel you're quite desperate to change jobs, so offering you a lower-than-they-would-normally-offer salary.

It's far easier to leave it off. It's only June - you're a recent grad. If they ask about the break, you can make generic noises about taking time off after graduation, and getting your life in order and ducks in a row. Hell, you could even at that stage mention that you've dipped your toe in the water and taken on some pro-tem work. If you do that, you want to spin it so it looks like you took it on to get a bit of experience, testing the waters etc.

But generally, I just wouldn't mention it.
posted by djgh at 8:27 AM on June 13, 2010


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