Skip

Word for steel gates pulled down over storefronts at night?
November 9, 2009 9:03 PM   Subscribe

Is there a specific word for those rolling, pull-down gates that cover up storefronts in old-school cities (Brooklyn, Barcelona) at night? Here's a picture of the kind of gates I mean.

Grates? Doors? I feel like there has to be a more specific word. Spanish or English would be fine. Thanks!
posted by jcruelty to Writing & Language (28 answers total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
 
Looks like it's just plain "store front gate" or "rolling gate". Old-school would be something like "portcullis."
posted by mynameisluka at 9:09 PM on November 9, 2009


I've always heard them referred to as just "shutters".
posted by Dreamcast at 9:10 PM on November 9, 2009


Well, portcullises don't roll up...I would just call it a rolling gate...
posted by dfriedman at 9:11 PM on November 9, 2009


Industrial rolling gate?
posted by functionequalsform at 9:16 PM on November 9, 2009


roll up doors
posted by buggzzee23 at 9:18 PM on November 9, 2009


Interesting … the rest of the world calls them "roller doors" or "roller shutters" (and the same term is used across home / shop / industrial versions, with "roller shutter" tending to mean the security versions), but a bit of Googling seems to indicate they're not commonly called that in the US.

The googlebait at the bottom of this page lists quite a few terms.
posted by Pinback at 9:20 PM on November 9, 2009


They're referred to as "roll-up doors", just like buggzzee23 says.
posted by LionIndex at 9:28 PM on November 9, 2009


Shutters. My in-laws' coffee shop in Japan has them, and every morning they draw them up, and every evening they pull them down, giving each day bookends of beginning and finality.
posted by KokuRyu at 9:28 PM on November 9, 2009 [4 favorites]


Roller shutters.
posted by pompomtom at 9:37 PM on November 9, 2009


I always heard those called "steel shutters".
posted by crabintheocean at 9:44 PM on November 9, 2009 [1 favorite]


Trying to find them in the Sweet's catalog, they seem to frequently be named "overhead coiling doors" or "rolling service doors", and would be covered by CSI division 08330 (which does call them overhead coilling doors)
posted by LionIndex at 9:57 PM on November 9, 2009


Not sure what relevance it might have for naming conventions, but in Southeast Asia such doors are as common on street-level entrances to residential dwellings as they are on store fronts or commercial establishments. When the doors are open, the area of the home just inside forms a kind of sitting room that's directly connected to the sidewalk/street outside. It's a very different arrangement of personal and public space than most Westerners/Americans might associate with this type of door when it's used for businesses. Since many of these Asian homes share common walls with neighboring buildings on the other sides, the opening formed by these front "doors" often served as the only "window" on ground floor. Again, not sure any of this relates to the names you're seeking, except that it might be curious to learn how any of the Asian languages refer to this type of door and what the English translations for such terms might be.
posted by 5Q7 at 10:07 PM on November 9, 2009 [2 favorites]


Like Pinback says: roller doors.
posted by meech at 10:07 PM on November 9, 2009


Is there a specific word for those rolling, pull-down gates that cover up storefronts in old-school cities (Brooklyn, Barcelona) at night?

Do Lewiston, Maine and Mt. Ephraim, NJ count as "old school?" Because I've just confirmed that I have photographic evidence of those gates being used in both places.
posted by Mayor Curley at 10:14 PM on November 9, 2009


They exist in Seattle too (both in older areas and occasionally in newer areas, I assume whenever the shop owner's worried about vandalism or breakins at night). I don't think I've heard them called anything other than the names people have already suggested.
posted by hattifattener at 10:59 PM on November 9, 2009


Shutters in Japan, but I called them shutters when I was in the US, too.
posted by armage at 12:01 AM on November 10, 2009 [1 favorite]


UK - shutters
posted by fire&wings at 2:29 AM on November 10, 2009


In NYC- City Gates!
posted by jara1953 at 3:31 AM on November 10, 2009


in dutch: rolluik
posted by ouke at 3:58 AM on November 10, 2009


I once heard of them called Jalousie, but that was in a residential setting.
posted by Gungho at 5:53 AM on November 10, 2009


Riot gates. (Not pretty, I know, but I just read a book set in Manhattan -- Lush Life by Richard Price -- that used the term several times.)
posted by Mid at 7:09 AM on November 10, 2009


Boston, MA - steel shutters.
posted by kuujjuarapik at 7:12 AM on November 10, 2009


Native Manhattanite here, seconding Mid on "riot gate."

I think I've also heard them called "storm gates" in hurricane-prone cities.
posted by scratch at 7:52 AM on November 10, 2009


Thanks all. Doesn't seem like there's a definitive answer, but I appreciate the suggestions. Context for this question: I took pix of these gates when in Barcelona and wasn't sure what to name the resulting photoset. I ended up going with "Barcelona storefront shutters."
posted by jcruelty at 8:05 AM on November 10, 2009


In Glasgow UK, the firms that install these call them security shutters.
posted by multivalent at 8:43 AM on November 10, 2009


In Catalan I believe they are "finestrons de seguretat".
posted by rongorongo at 9:15 AM on November 10, 2009


I've heard overhead door (I'm guessing because it's printed on the case that the door retracts into), security grate and rollup door.
posted by electroboy at 9:22 AM on November 10, 2009


Nthing "steel shutters." Brooklyn.
posted by thegreatfleecircus at 10:47 AM on November 10, 2009


« Older What should I do with a wounde...   |  Almost every dream I have is a... Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.


Post