Recommend an accurate and reliable scale for dieting purposes.
March 1, 2004 10:26 PM   Subscribe

Looking for recommendations on an accurate and reliable (but affordable) scale for dieting purposes. The usual bathroom scales just don't seem to give consistent results. Any recommendations?
posted by oissubke to Technology (7 answers total)
 
huh. the important thing typically is to *always use the same scale* -- it doesn't matter so much how much you weigh on one scale or another, but the difference in your weight that ONE scale measures over time.

if you want to use a good scale on a consistent basis, join a gym -- most of them seem to have balance-beam scales (the kind you see in a doctor's office) which i tend to trust more than any home digital scale.
posted by fishfucker at 11:02 PM on March 1, 2004


It does matter, actually, becase some scales are more precise and more reliable than others. I use the Tanita BFP-622, but I'm not sure they make that model anymore. More important than the scale, however, is that you ignore your daily weight and instead computer a trend that seperates the noise (the daily varaitions in weight due to the water in your system) from the signal. The process is described in The Hacker's Diet. (Also described here.
posted by gd779 at 11:50 PM on March 1, 2004


Simple.

Don't use the scales. They are misleading. For instance, if you put on some muscle due to resistance training, your weight *will* go up, but it will be "good" weight. Also, depending on the time of day, your weight can fluctuate by up to 4 Kilograms.

Instead, use a tape measure and check your waist size. That's likely to tell you far more.
posted by madman at 5:27 AM on March 2, 2004


What gd779 said. While there is much controvercy as to their accuracy in measuring absolute BFP, they are accurate and consistent with reference to their own readings, such that you can confidently track gains/losses in BFP.
posted by Fupped Duck at 7:13 AM on March 2, 2004


Don't use the scales. They are misleading. For instance, if you put on some muscle due to resistance training, your weight *will* go up, but it will be "good" weight . . . Instead, use a tape measure and check your waist size.

ABSOLUTELY. Or just watch how your clothes fit. Slow progress on a scale can be demoralizing and can affect your attitude. If you're (hopefully) exercising, you're putting on muscle, and muscle weighs considerably more than fat.

Moderation is the key. If you cut your carbs and general calorie intake too much, your body will go into "survival mode," hoarding instead of burning fat, defeating the purpose as well as giving you stores of cellulite.

I used to be calorie-deficient and exercise too much; I upped my intake to three good meals per day (with plenty of carbs) and lowered my exercise (and stress) to moderate, and I finally lost those last 10 pounds that I could never lose when I was biking one to two hours a day and skimping on meals.
posted by Shane at 7:28 AM on March 2, 2004


Good advice, all. I was planning to use a combination of weight and measurements, but the reminders are helpful.

That being said, here's an embarassingly naive question -- how exactly do you measure a man's "waist"? Is it the beltline? Is it the bellybutton line? Somewhere else entirely?
posted by oissubke at 10:00 AM on March 2, 2004


...how exactly do you measure a man's "waist"?

I have absolutely no clue. At some point you have to buy new pants, though. First you're happy, then you're bummed out 'cuz they cost $$.
posted by Shane at 12:20 PM on March 2, 2004


« Older Cryogenic storage for Mario   |   How do I go about finding how many different... Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.