Help me buy my wife a good skateboard
January 11, 2004 7:13 PM   Subscribe

So my 27 year old wife has suddenly decided she wants to become a skate boarder. She wanted to learn in 3rd grade, but got a bike instead. She now wants to make up for lost time. I know nothing about skate boards. How much will it set me back for a decent skateboard?

Obviously she doesn't need a board made by Tony Hawk, but she's pretty serious and doesn't give up easily, so I'd at least like to invest in a board that she can get better on and isn't so crappy it holds her back.
posted by justgary to Sports, Hobbies, & Recreation (11 answers total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
They generally cost about $100, pre-assembled. Before my knees gave out, I bought from CCS when ordering mail order.

Your local skateshop would be more than happy to help you out, too.
posted by cmonkey at 7:28 PM on January 11, 2004


Hi,
I'd NEVER buy from CCS as they are about the single most incompetent shop online. Go out and find your local skate shop. They will be thrilled to sell you decent "blank" deck for the 80 dollar range complete. Now, about skating in late the twenty age. All the parks I have been to recently ALL have a growing number of thirty-something skaters out there. Me, included. I started back skating two years ago. Now, we got an old-guys posse! Yep. When we show up, those 15 year olds just gawk, and hope one day, it'll be them, so old, still skating. It's all quite cool. But it hurts more. (Isn't bursitis something OLD PEOPLE get?!?!)
Best of luck. And *I* like element brand boards.
posted by BrodieShadeTree at 8:20 PM on January 11, 2004


Try to pick one up used. Check your yellow pages to see if there's a used sporting goods store around. Or call a skate board shop and see if they sell used gear. I got my daughter a decent used one for $70, and it was much better than buying a cheaply made new one.
posted by jasper411 at 8:22 PM on January 11, 2004


Instead of getting a used board or ordering online, I'd suggest buying from a skate shop, or at least going to one first and testing out different boards. There are a number of different factors that differentiate types of boards, such as the width of the deck and the "tightness" of the trucks. She needs to find one she's comfortable width.
posted by tomorama at 9:06 PM on January 11, 2004


Even the board Tony Hawk runs only costs around $120, so it's not like typical sports where there are entry level and expert level equipment with wide price differences.

Go to a local skate shop (or better yet, go with her or have her go) and if they give you attitude walk out and find a shop that's cool (I hate record stores, bicycle shops, and skate shops that take an elitist attitude with customers based on how you look). Anyway, any blank deck setup will be $80-$90 so just go with that.

It's funny that Brodie mentioned over 30 clubs, one of the local skateparks to me has an over-30 night where the only people allowed one night a week are old guys. Some are starting out, many are just catching up to where they were at 15, and a few have never stopped, but it's great.
posted by mathowie at 9:06 PM on January 11, 2004


How do you enforce an over-30 rule? It's not like you ol' farts have any legitimate claim to the public park! Whatcha gonna do, go thump all the young punks? [bfg]


(No, seriously, how do you enforce it? How did it get started?)
posted by five fresh fish at 9:30 PM on January 11, 2004


Not to sound snarky, but factor in medical insurance and deductables. The 27 year old body doesn't bounce back off the concrete as nimbly as the average 14 year old body does.

Also, shoes are important - I recall burning through a pair a month back in my 'boarding days. I think the average skate shoes runs approx. 50-75 USD.
posted by jazzkat11 at 10:10 PM on January 11, 2004


My dad made my skateboards - I had two of them. 2x4's and strap-on skates, taken apart and nailed onto the board, I kid you not. No helmets nor pads, no skateparks then, we'd just board around the neighborhood on the sidewalks, or for more daring rides, down the "hill of death" that ended in my front yard. You younger folks are so lucky....
posted by Lynsey at 10:44 PM on January 11, 2004


No, seriously, how do you enforce it? How did it get started?

It's at an indoor, private skatepark so it's pretty easy to enforce. The guy at the door doesn't let 15 year old grommets in. I have no idea how it started.
posted by mathowie at 12:04 AM on January 12, 2004


get a long board - cooler and much more fun for big kids.

http://www.tahoelongboards.com
posted by specialk420 at 12:04 PM on January 12, 2004


Thanks to everyone for the suggestions. My wife has also enjoyed them and we're taking note of all the great advice.

Go to a local skate shop (or better yet, go with her or have her go) and if they give you attitude walk out and find a shop that's cool (I hate record stores, bicycle shops, and skate shops that take an elitist attitude with customers based on how you look).

I was worried about that kind of thing happening. I think we've found a local skate shop we're going to try out. The owner seems pretty cool.

Not to sound snarky, but factor in medical insurance and deductables. The 27 year old body doesn't bounce back off the concrete as nimbly as the average 14 year old body does.

The first thing I told her when she brought up the subject was the injury angle. Growing up I didn't skate, but I had friends who did, were good, and still stayed scraped, bloody, and broken.

Its not as bad as it seems however. She's an athlete (marathon, long distant biking, mountain biking, etc) so she's not some couch potato.
That said, I know injuries will come. But she'll eventually get pretty good. She's got a hard head. ;)
posted by justgary at 9:35 PM on January 12, 2004


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