Universal Basic Income studies and creative or risky pursuits
July 31, 2020 4:28 PM   Subscribe

Are there any Universal Basic Income studies showing that UBI (the good kind not the regressive kind) promotes art, music, other economically “risky” activities?
posted by The Last Sockpuppet to Society & Culture (3 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
Not about UBI, but instead about the WPA; also a history instead of a study, but it's a place to start. (Maybe there are studies about the effect of the Federal Art Project?)
posted by nat at 5:04 PM on July 31 [1 favorite]


Finnish basic income pilot improved wellbeing, study finds (Guardian, May 7, 2020, "The scheme also gave some participants “the possibility to try and live their dreams”, [Prof Helena Blomberg-Kroll, who led the study,] said. “Freelancers and artists and entrepreneurs had more positive views on the effects of the basic income, which some felt had created opportunities for them to start businesses.”)
posted by katra at 7:58 PM on July 31 [1 favorite]


I feel like if you dig into what is happening in Canada Basic Income you will find something. The Arts organizations are certainly pushing for it, and CERB has been a lifesaver for so many of my art friends. We already had UBI for 65+ (OAS & GIS) and children 0-18 (CCTB/baby bonus) for decades, as well as a small amount of quarterly GST payments for low-income households (working poor, disabled, and/or on welfare) Ontario had committed to a three year pilot of $17,000 a year (shut down by a change in government amid much protestations, and CERB came out in april and 22% of Canadians received it - a quick two minute automated call and $2,000 monthly deposited in their bank account 24 hours later. It is taxable, and administered by CRA (our IRS), but the stability allowed people to cope with the pandemic (those eligible for OAS, GST and CCTB also received additional payments in May/June).
posted by saucysault at 9:01 PM on August 1


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