Should I Reapply?
September 5, 2018 5:08 PM   Subscribe

A place I applied to as manager for a job two years ago has since gone through two managers. I thought I was qualified then after having just completed a successful project for the place as a contractor, and with a lifetime of related and specific experience. I have a good reputation for good work and get along well with everyone else when I do come in to do volunteer work.

On a recent random visit, the big boss said I should consider re-applying. I am gunshy because I think the people who passed me over the first time are still there and don't know if I want to go through the exercise again. Friends tell me that since I'm at retirement age and am doing other things, I have nothing to lose, and I should apply but take a Morgan Freeman/Shawshank Redemption attitude; not caring whether I get it or not. Plus, it is significant that the big boss themselves asked me to apply (though, that could be to show they asked a range of candidates).

I, on the other hand, wanted this job very much two years ago and would like to see if I could improve the quality of the work or the working conditions for staff. But this organization has epic drama issues which contributes to high turnover and inconsistent organizational policies. Not asking you to tell me what I should do, but curious to know what you think.
posted by anonymous to Work & Money (7 answers total)
 
I was all set to say, "sure, go for it!" until I read your last paragraph and noped out. They've already going through two managers in two years and there are epic drama issues causing high turnover. If you got this job, how soon would it be before you're posting another ask wondering how soon is too soon to quit? There is an emotional toll that comes with working in an environment like that and unless you're made of steel or actually love the drama, consider that very carefully.
posted by acidnova at 5:16 PM on September 5, 2018 [12 favorites]


Depends on whether the drama is coming from above (in which case nope) or from below (in which case, ask the interviewers/big bosses whether they would stand behind you in efforts to make substantial changes to reduce turnover and improve policies).
posted by sheldman at 5:22 PM on September 5, 2018 [1 favorite]


Your last paragraph makes it sound like you shouldn't work there because you don't think it'll be a good environment for you. That said..

I am gunshy because I think the people who passed me over the first time are still there

So what? Not getting picked for a job doesn't mean they thought you were a terrible fit, it means they liked at least one person better than you. It sucks, but that's part of life. If the big boss is asking you to apply again, it's a good sign that they did like you, they just liked someone else a little bit more.
posted by Candleman at 5:27 PM on September 5, 2018


this organization has epic drama issues which contributes to high turnover and inconsistent organizational policies

You don't actually want this job. Trust me. You could probably get it if you applied and went in with a complete DGAF attitude (not a bad strategy in any job interview where you're sure you're definitely qualified) but you don't want it. Save yourself while you still can!
posted by Anticipation Of A New Lover's Arrival, The at 5:28 PM on September 5, 2018


I, on the other hand, wanted this job very much two years ago and would like to see if I could improve the quality of the work or the working conditions for staff. But this organization has epic drama issues which contributes to high turnover and inconsistent organizational policies.

Going in guns blazing with the full support of the big boss might be a possibility, but only if you’ll be in a place to fix these issues. If not I’d give it a pass lest you end up the third manager in three years to quit in frustration.
posted by Tell Me No Lies at 7:24 PM on September 5, 2018


Chiming in to say, do you have a sense for WHAT is ramping up the drama? Will the big boss listen to - hey, this is drama, let’s deal with the roots... or are they more likely to make it into a topiary garden of drama because they are also entrenched.

Interview and ask, or have a frank conversation with the boss to say, this is the rep, what am I missing to make this more attractive employement-wise, as I volunteer so the drama can get left behind and doesn’t affect my income/day-to-day well-being.
posted by childofTethys at 4:17 AM on September 6, 2018


Just because you can apply doesn't mean you should. Unless you desperately need the work/benefits the last bit about the drama is more than enough reason to nope the heck out of there.
posted by wwax at 9:27 AM on September 6, 2018


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