Ox Tail Recipe
September 14, 2005 4:27 PM   Subscribe

Anyone have a good recipe for ox tail?

I had a amazingly good dinner a year ago of ox tail in a red sauce, in a restaurant at the Gleneagles Hotel in Auchterarder, Scotland. The sauce was fantastic and the meat was falling off the bone. Does anyone have a recepie for ox tail that they would recommend? I'd love to be able to have this meal again.

Also, anyone know a great place in the Boston area where I could get ox tail?
posted by NotMyselfRightNow to Food & Drink (15 answers total)
 
Buying oxtail... Haymarket's meat shop (pilgrim) often has it. Savenor's will definitely have it, at a higher price and more convenient hours. I think that's 100 Cambridge Street, Boston. Recently, the Harvest Co-op on Mass Ave had it the last time I went - their meat selection has been getting pretty good.

If you liked that oxtail you have to try the oxtail meat and oxtail soup at Iruña in Harvard Square...
posted by whatzit at 4:44 PM on September 14, 2005


One word - PRIONS

Otherwise, the best way to enjoy oxtail, IMHO, is in a soup.
posted by caddis at 4:51 PM on September 14, 2005


Email me and I will give you a fricking delicious recipe for Korean oxtail soup. I make it about once a month; it's one of my big comfort foods. My wife's mom taught me how to make it, and I can't imagine anyone not loving it.
posted by luriete at 4:59 PM on September 14, 2005


You can buy it at almost any supermarket. I saw it at Market Basket in Somerville the other day for a couple bucks a pound. Whole Foods will charge significantly more.

If you are asking about an oxtail dish, I'd recommend a Sichuan restaurant for a change of oxtail pace. You can get some great stuff involving oxtail, hot oil, and sometimes rabbit or tripe (often cold).

also, luriete- please post the recipe here
posted by rxrfrx at 5:12 PM on September 14, 2005


Best answer: An article in The Observer about the return of ox tail.

My favourite ox tail recipe: Nigel Slater's 'dark, sticky meat for a winter's night'.
posted by obiwanwasabi at 5:21 PM on September 14, 2005


Yes, luriete, we all want the recipe! Or is it a family secret?
posted by librarina at 5:26 PM on September 14, 2005


hoh... oxtail. I make it randomly every time, based on your typical ragout or goulash.

super88 (comm ave in ~a-b, also now in chinatown) is quite likely to have it.

luriete -- would it happen to be based on the standard-ish kimchi soup base? 'cos putting those two together does sound damned tastey.
posted by dorian at 5:59 PM on September 14, 2005


I've got to agree with caddis about the prions, sorry. Not being a party pooper but vCJD would be a sucky way to go.
http://www.cspinet.org/foodsafety/saferbeef.html
(under highest risk category)
posted by rolypolyman at 6:41 PM on September 14, 2005


Best answer: In the Philippines, we have a staple oxtail w/ peanut sauce stew called Kare Kare. The Pinoy Cook recipe calls for some relatively uncommon ingredients, like heart of banana and rice flour. The former is, imho, optional but you should be able to pick up either of them at the 88 if you go there for your ox-tail, and if you can't get rice flour, you can substitute a similar amount of dry rice ground up in a spice grinder.
posted by bl1nk at 7:12 PM on September 14, 2005


Best answer: OK. Here you go. Take about 2-4 lbs of oxtail, rinse well and keep rinsing until the water is clear - get all residual blood and crap off of it. Then sear in the bottom of a pan with a TINY bit of oil - use something with no flavor if possible, like safflower, but NOT peanut or sesame oil. This step is optional.

Boil a huge pot of water, drop the meat in. Let it boil down by half and add more water; do this maybe 4-6 times over the course of four hours. You want the meat falling off the bone. Every 30 minutes or so, skim the fat off the top until you have a milky white broth (a combination of fat and bone marrow) that has a very smooth, silky texture.

It's usually served on top of a big bowl of steamed rice, garnished with plenty of finely-chopped green onion and roasted sesame seed. My wife's family adds a fair amount of those small ovoid Korean ricecakes that you find in Korean soups (pronounced "dduk") - which you can find frozen for very cheap at any decent asian market - as soon as the meat is pretty much falling off the bones and then lets it cook an addition 20 minutes to soften them up. I prefer it simply with the green onions and sesame over rice, however.

It is quite simply one of the most wonderful soups I've ever had, and aside from the time involved, is profoundly easy to make.

I've had some luck cutting the time down by 50% by using a pressure cooker. If you use such a device, however, be sure to let it boil first, pour off the broth (which will take most of the fat and blood and connective tissue) and then start over again. That way you don't have to skim the fat constantly, which is a real pain with a pressure cooker - you have to keep letting steam/pressure off, burning the crap out of yourself regularly, and then letting it cool enough to open, etc.
posted by luriete at 7:56 PM on September 14, 2005


Best answer: Oxtail ravioli. Big ravioli, six or more inches across, filled with braised oxtail meat, caramelized onion and herbage, served in the oxtail broth with an herb gremolata. Saw the recipe in Australian Gourmet Traveller magazine, and it can be found here.

I've made it a couple of times, and it's the shiznit.
posted by solid-one-love at 8:36 PM on September 14, 2005


Best answer: my mom makes an awesome soup. shiitake mushrooms, chunks of daikon, tons of green onion, cilantro, and ginger. the more ginger the better, both whole chunks of root to boil to flavor the soup and shaved bits at the end for extra kick. green onion and cilantro not boiled in the soup but thrown in at the end to retain a bit of crunch. had a similar version from a restaurant with a few peppercorns that went well too.
posted by juv3nal at 12:36 AM on September 15, 2005


My wife and mother-in-law make a Persian stew called Ab Gusht with ox tail (from what I gather it is typically made with mutton, but they're weird). Unfortunately, I'm having a hard time finding a recipe in English that uses ox tail for it...
posted by kuperman at 4:29 AM on September 15, 2005


what are PRIONS and if they are so scary why are the latinos etc that eat this stuff by the gross in my neighborhood not dropping dead left and right?
posted by spicynuts at 1:15 PM on September 15, 2005


You'll notice on rolypolyman's link that "beef products from grass-fed and organic cattle. (These cattle should not have been exposed to any animal products in their feed.)" are in the little to no risk. So just buy organic and you should be fine. It's more expensive, but it's also more delicious.

I'm really excited about all the soups on this thread, as well as the ravioli. YUM.
posted by librarina at 11:10 AM on September 18, 2005


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