Please help identify this Napolean Dynamite intro food item.
December 4, 2004 11:29 AM   Subscribe

In the opening credits to Napoleon Dynamite, what is the brown thing-on-a-stick, served with peas, ketchup and peach slices?
posted by punilux to Food & Drink (21 answers total)
 
A corndog?
posted by gyc at 11:54 AM on December 4, 2004


Yeah, I thought it was a corn dog, too.

(It's a breaded hot dog on a stick.)
posted by strikhedonia at 11:56 AM on December 4, 2004


Thanks, that's it. They sound delicious. Deep fried too! (I'm in the UK where the film only started yesterday, and I've never seen or heard of a corndog before).
posted by punilux at 12:04 PM on December 4, 2004


Pogo.
posted by stray at 12:27 PM on December 4, 2004


"I've never seen or heard of a corndog before"

You poor, poor, deprived brits. Europeans always make fun of us Americans for being fat... but the truth is we're fat on culture. Deep-fried culture.
posted by buriednexttoyou at 1:03 PM on December 4, 2004 [1 favorite]


There go my plans to ever move to the the UK. If corndogs are wrong, then I never want to be right.
posted by drezdn at 1:19 PM on December 4, 2004


We're not totally beyond redemption here. I've just shot out and bought the ingredients for this recipe. I'll report back just as soon as I'm off bypass. Thanks all.
posted by punilux at 1:32 PM on December 4, 2004


You poor, poor, deprived brits. Europeans always make fun of us Americans for being fat... but the truth is we're fat on culture. Deep-fried culture.

um, didn't the Brits invent things like deep fried mars bars and oreos? I think they know they're heart attack food.
posted by clubfoote at 1:39 PM on December 4, 2004


ketchup? eeewwwww

nonononono - corndogs MUST be eaten with yellow mustard!
posted by kamylyon at 1:57 PM on December 4, 2004


Toad-in-the-Hole also comes from the UK, I believe. While not strictly edible, it makes excellent prank material on unsuspecting Resident Assistants in college dormitories.

on preview, or dipped in cheez whiz.
posted by sciurus at 1:58 PM on December 4, 2004


Mmm, Hot Dog on a Stick.
posted by waxpancake at 2:23 PM on December 4, 2004


It's a corndog. I'm amazed there are places where this food is unknown.
posted by majick at 4:11 PM on December 4, 2004


Nothing beats a Fletcher's Texas State Fair Dog (yeah, in Texas we call them Corny Dogs), at the state fair, fresh from the fryer, on the way to go watch the Texas/OU game.

Unless you add a funnel cake for dessert.
posted by stovenator at 4:54 PM on December 4, 2004


The grocery-store variety, tame corn dogs are one thing, but generally when I see them at fairs and other yee-haw Southern events, they're ginormous. My husband and I are embarrassed to get them, and call them horsecocks.
posted by littlegreenlights at 5:26 PM on December 4, 2004


*gag*

Better than Frito-Pie I suppose.

Two staples of Oklahoma elementary school nutrition.
posted by Jack Karaoke at 9:07 PM on December 4, 2004


I always hated the corn dogs we had for lunch in elementary school. How much better are the corn dogs served at fairs and such? Judging solely by the quality of foods besides corn dogs served at school, I'm afraid that I might be unfairly judging corn dogs and am wonding if I'm missing out on a great culinary delight.
posted by gyc at 10:05 PM on December 4, 2004


Corn dogs are not totally unknown in the UK, they have at least put in an appearance in London in the past. There was a place selling them in Camden Town, on Chalk Farm Road just south of the canal, twenty-something years ago.
posted by Quinbus Flestrin at 11:09 PM on December 4, 2004


There are yummy vegetarian corn-dogs too, mmmm.
posted by milovoo at 1:19 PM on December 5, 2004


gyc: The grade school variety are likely frozen and reheated, but ones at state fairs are fried on-the-spot, so they're fresher and the outer layer is less hard and more delicious. They might be made with higher quality ingredients or a more lovingly crafted batter recipe, too. Of course, you're still stuck with a mysteriously-composed hot dog in the middle either way.
posted by katieinshoes at 2:29 PM on December 5, 2004


In Australia they're valled 'pluto pups' or 'dagwood dogs'. I have no idea why. They're generally only eaten at the annual show (our equivalent of your county fairs, I guess), though you sometimes see them sans-stick in fish and chip shops beside the chiko rolls.
posted by obiwanwasabi at 6:28 PM on December 5, 2004


haven't seen bagel dogs in awhile, which is another great hotdog variation of which youmight not be aware.

also, corndogs rool.
posted by fishfucker at 8:02 PM on December 6, 2004


« Older Advice on transferring 8mm film to digital video.   |   Eyeglasses for the Gym Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.