Ttickets to see a live taping of a Japanese game show
February 5, 2009 4:00 PM   Subscribe

How do I get tickets to see a live taping of a Japanese game show? My husband and I will be in Tokyo in April. The stranger the show and its premise, the better.
posted by babysingsing to Travel & Transportation around Tokyo, Japan (5 answers total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
As far as I know, you have to send in a postcard to the television studio; there is then a lottery and the lucky few are invited to attend the show. Television is an even bigger part of life in Japan than it is in western countries. And, believe it or not, there are not that many strange tv shows coming out of Japan. There are a lot of talk shows, which, even if you understand Japanese, are quite boring. And, for a lot of those shows, the producers want to fill the audience with cute young things (I'm not saying you aren't cute).

You could check out the headquarters of one of the major broadcasters in Tokyo, which would be an interesting and offbeat tourist experience in and of itself.

The TBS headquarters are in Akasaka. Here it is in Google Maps, and here is a little more background on TBS.

Who knows, maybe you'll get lucky and will be able to catch a show.
posted by KokuRyu at 4:55 PM on February 5, 2009


KokuRyu is right: nearly all of the broadcasters require you to apply beforehand, and there is no guarantee you will be chosen. Some shows only want audience members of a particular age range and/or gender (say, only women between 16-29 years old), so that's yet another hurdle.

In case anyone here does want to become an audience member for a particular program, it seems that the major Tokyo broadcasters outsource this to Applause, a separate company. If you know Japanese and are willing to register, you may have a shot at being chosen.

If you want to go on a studio tour or otherwise just be shown around the production facilities, public broadcasterNHK gives one for the first 30 people to arrive at their studio near Yoyogi Park. Most of the major broadcasters in Tokyo have some kind of "museum"-like space open to the public.
posted by armage at 6:01 PM on February 5, 2009 [1 favorite]


Two words:

medatsu -- to stand out.

and

muri -- no way.

As far as I can remember the only TV shows with studio audiences also /show/ these audiences on TV. "Who's the gaijin?" isn't something the producers want to have the viewers think, I would think.


There was earlier this decade a strange TV show where they interviewed a massive amount of (quite fluent) foreigners on different debate points in a wide-show setting. This might be a show you could get in, perhaps the zainichi peeps here can help you out on this show name if it's still on the air.
posted by troy at 11:54 PM on February 5, 2009


There was earlier this decade a strange TV show where they interviewed a massive amount of (quite fluent) foreigners on different debate points in a wide-show setting.

That was "Koko ga hen da yo, Nihonjin", or "Japanese people, your country is really strange."

It was kind of funny and kind of horrible, because it made all foreigners look like Kansai dialect-speaking meatheads.


Two words:

medatsu -- to stand out.

and

muri -- no way.


I think what troy is getting at here is that because you are "foreigners", you will stand out and there is no way that they will allow to watch a live studio taping. Based on the evidence in this thread, this is just an assumption, and you should really make the effort to go to a studio and try to attend a live recording.

The thing about being "foreign" in Japan is that you will be given opportunities to do things no Japanese can ever do, and this phenomenon is especially true when you first arrive in the country (the first year or so) and still haven't figured out how to fit in.

Ignorance of the rules, no knowledge of the Japanese language, plus a polite, smiling, sunny - but insistent - demeanor are your best tools for getting to watch that live tv show.
posted by KokuRyu at 7:04 AM on February 6, 2009


I would say there is very little chance and that what you think is a Japanese game show is in fact a comedy show. Every single "Japanese game show" clip I've seen on youtube is actually just a comedy show filled with professional comedians and TV personalities. The myth of the Japanese game show is one of my biggest internet pet peeves. Don't get me wrong they're usually hilarious and brilliantly creative, but they aren't game shows and they don't use regular people.
posted by robofunk at 7:54 AM on February 6, 2009


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