US food + UK food = ??
September 13, 2017 7:20 AM   Subscribe

Help me think of typical UK foods with US ingredients and vice versa. This is for a party, and no idea is too crazy.

Also what could constitute US or UK food can be given a broad interpretation. Classic ingredients or dishes or snacks in a US/UK mashup. Some examples we have so far include nachos with stilton cheese, sloppy joe haggis, pastrami pork pie, mac and cheese batch sandwich. Even a list of "classic" foods/dishes/&c from these countries would be useful: if you're from the US or UK, what do you think of as "typical" of the other country? From your own country?
posted by tractorfeed to Food & Drink (92 answers total) 37 users marked this as a favorite
 
US-style fluffy pancakes with clotted cream on? (holy crap that sounds delicious)
posted by soren_lorensen at 7:24 AM on September 13 [10 favorites]


How about Toad in the Hole but with Hebrew National hot dogs or similar?
posted by saladin at 7:27 AM on September 13 [1 favorite]


Ooh. A trifle made with something like chocolate jello instant pudding and Twinkies? (I would eat that...)
posted by Green Eyed Monster at 7:28 AM on September 13 [4 favorites]


I would consider pumpkin and peanut butter to be very American ingredients.
posted by backseatpilot at 7:35 AM on September 13 [1 favorite]


This thread is horrific.

Deep fried Mars bars. (You would use a Milky Way.)
posted by DarlingBri at 7:37 AM on September 13 [7 favorites]


Love the "specialrelationship" tag.

Some suggestions:

A steak and kidney pie, but prepared like an empanada -- something you could eat with your hands.

Or fish and chips, but with catfish (or some other species native to the US) and the chips (fries) served with ketchup instead of malt vinegar.

Chili, but made with this British curry sauce.
posted by Cash4Lead at 7:40 AM on September 13 [2 favorites]


Fish and potato chips.
posted by roger ackroyd at 7:41 AM on September 13 [12 favorites]


I would consider pumpkin and peanut butter to be very American ingredients.

Ooh, there you go then - pumpkin and/or peanut butter scones.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 7:41 AM on September 13 [7 favorites]


The Mar-mar: a sandwich sort of like the all-American PB&J, but using marmite and marmalade, very British.

I find it to be a tasty snack but due to the perversity of the whole thing it usually horrifies Brits and Americans alike!
posted by SaltySalticid at 7:41 AM on September 13 [7 favorites]


Milwaukee's Best and tonic.
posted by The corpse in the library at 7:43 AM on September 13 [2 favorites]


Oh, and yeah, peanut butter would definitely read "US". I watch the Irish-based youtube channel "Facts" a lot - it's a sort of Buzzfeed clone, with a lot of taste-testing of food items. Lots of times the food items are from the US, and it's become kind of a running joke on the site that "holy crap, the US puts peanut butter in everything."
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 7:43 AM on September 13 [3 favorites]


I would consider pumpkin and peanut butter to be very American ingredients.

Pumpkin tarts could be a thing. Peanut butter flapjacks seems like it has a lot of potential.
posted by DarlingBri at 7:44 AM on September 13 [3 favorites]


S'mores, but with hobnob biscuits instead of the graham and chocolate. Have also had great success with a variation using lemon curd instead of the chocolate in a regular smore, not sure if it is UK-ish enough for you.
posted by Exceptional_Hubris at 7:44 AM on September 13 [3 favorites]


Ooh. A trifle made with something like chocolate jello instant pudding and Twinkies?

Um ... so we make this all the time with brownies from a box mix, instant pudding, Cool Whip (!!!), and chopped candy bars, and it is, indeed, glorious.

You could wrap your fish and chips in a USA Today.
posted by uncleozzy at 7:45 AM on September 13 [5 favorites]


Buffalo chicken tikka masala.
posted by The corpse in the library at 7:46 AM on September 13 [23 favorites]


Oh man, the whole British Bites section of Serious Eats is giving me ideas.

Like if you made a hamburger with gentleman's relish... I'm not sure I'd eat it, but I'd be impressed.
posted by Cash4Lead at 7:47 AM on September 13


Sweet potatoes with Bird's custard.
posted by The corpse in the library at 7:47 AM on September 13 [1 favorite]




Buffalo chicken tikka masala.

Ha, I was just coming here to suggest butter chicken wings! Also, a sheperd's pie deep dish pizza and an apple cider Pimm's cup.
posted by everybody had matching towels at 7:49 AM on September 13 [1 favorite]


Potted lobster.
posted by The corpse in the library at 7:50 AM on September 13


The scones would have to have peanut butter _and jello_, this would be perfect.

Pimms in one of those red cups.

Digestive biscuits and gravy.
posted by quacks like a duck at 7:51 AM on September 13


Like if you made a hamburger with gentleman's relish..

A cheeseburger with a sharp English cheddar and Branston Pickle would be phenomenal.
posted by Faint of Butt at 7:52 AM on September 13 [3 favorites]


Oh, Branston pickle (small chunk, I guess) in place of green pickle relish on a hot dog. I bet that would be pretty nice, actually.
posted by uncleozzy at 7:52 AM on September 13


Pulled pork cottage pie
Chipotle Cornish pasty
posted by EndsOfInvention at 7:54 AM on September 13 [5 favorites]


Tater Tot butties with HP sauce
posted by Faint of Butt at 7:54 AM on September 13 [8 favorites]


You could make some kind of sausage rolls with hotdogs in and then make a wiggly line of ketchup on them.
posted by quacks like a duck at 7:55 AM on September 13


Chipotle Cornish pasty

that sounds amazing, but the devil's advocate in me is suspecting that a lot of people would say "isn't this just an empanada?"
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:03 AM on September 13 [3 favorites]


Texas toast, toasted, but cold and in a toast rack.
posted by The corpse in the library at 8:05 AM on September 13 [8 favorites]


This is godsawful, well done.

Baked Beans on Texas Toast.
posted by RhysPenbras at 8:07 AM on September 13 [10 favorites]


that sounds amazing, but the devil's advocate in me is suspecting that a lot of people would say "isn't this just an empanada?"
Pretty much, and this:
A steak and kidney pie, but prepared like an empanada
is just a Cornish pasty.
posted by EndsOfInvention at 8:08 AM on September 13 [1 favorite]


Jambalaya, made with HP Sauce.
posted by The corpse in the library at 8:10 AM on September 13


Cheese and onion sandwiches with Colby Jack, Vidalia onion, and Miracle Whip.
posted by CheeseLouise at 8:11 AM on September 13


California onion dip served with hedgehog crisps.
posted by The corpse in the library at 8:12 AM on September 13


> The scones would have to have peanut butter _and jello_, this would be perfect

Just checking: you know when Americans say "peanut butter and jelly," we mean "peanut butter and jam without chunks," right? Not Jell-O. I think you're taking it to the next level but am not sure.
posted by The corpse in the library at 8:14 AM on September 13 [14 favorites]


Right - I just went over to Wikipedia's list of English dishes and I've got some ideas.

* The ploughman's lunch is traditionally cheese, bread, an apple, and some kind of pickled-y condiment. Keep the apple, make the cheese a block of Velveeta (or go with a Vermont cheddar if that idea horrifies you, as it does me, to be honest), and use soda crackers or a kaiser roll for the bread; and then a classic deli half-sour spear for the pickle.

* There is a whole world of potted meat spreads - cooked meat chopped up fine and preserved in a small dish with butter. There must be some way to adapt what meat you use.

* Eton Mess is dead-easy - it's chopped strawberries and crushed-up meringue cookies stirred into whipped cream. Just use a more "American" fruit and cookie.

* The classic Victoria Sponge is a two-layer sponge cake with raspberry jam and whipped cream spread between the layers. Some kind of "all-american" fruit would do for the jam, and....either keep the whipped cream, or go with pudding?
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 8:17 AM on September 13 [2 favorites]


Something something bagels something Caerphilly-delphia cream cheese
posted by The corpse in the library at 8:17 AM on September 13 [2 favorites]


Texas chili pot pie

Chicken tikka masala Frito pie

Peanut butter and marmite sandwich
posted by penguinicity at 8:36 AM on September 13


I'm trying to think of how to craft a Full American Breakfast. Replace the back bacon with streaky bacon, obvs, and the bangers with a more American sausage. I guess hot dogs if you want to be Ugly American about it, bratwurst or andouille if you want a more polished American palate. Maybe scrapple instead of black pudding? Texas toast or maybe a bagel instead of the fried bread. Boston baked beans instead of the Heinz. Not sure there's much to do with the eggs and tomato.
posted by Rock Steady at 8:36 AM on September 13


This thread has already exceeded my expectations. Please keep 'em coming! I reali{z|s}e that I didn't specify that the party will be in the UK, so that is where I will be able to get my ingredients, thus, for example, HP sauce, Branston pickle = dead easy to come by; tater tots not so much (sob!). If any of you helpful mefites would like to see/consume the results come bonfire weekend, pls memail me. It will be, literally and figuratively, a big blowout.
posted by tractorfeed at 8:41 AM on September 13 [6 favorites]


I'd serve british sausages as if they were Chicago hotdogs, with all the pickles etc. If you couldn't find the traditional Chicago style pickles (the bright green one is a pain to find) ones, swap in British ones.

American Breakfast sausage with buttermilk pancake mix toad in the hole. If you can get ground pork you can make your own breakfast sausage as it doesn't use sausage skins.

Blueberrry scones instead of blueberry pancakes.

Banoffee Pie but with spiced pumpkin/sweet potatoe pie filling instead of bananas.

Mac & Cheese with yummy British cheeses.

Icecream sandwiches using a traditional british biscuit/cookie & local icecream.

Chicago style deep dish pizza but with super British Pizza toppings.

Chili filled meat pies.
posted by wwax at 8:41 AM on September 13 [2 favorites]


the corpse in the library: Just checking: you know when Americans say "peanut butter and jelly," we mean "peanut butter and jam without chunks," right? Not Jell-O.

I did intend "peanut butter and jelly", I just ran my mental word-US-ification routine twice by accident.
But something with peanut butter and actual jello would also work!

Fries (as per McDonalds) with proper chip shop curry sauce (purchased from a chip shop) would also be excellent.
posted by quacks like a duck at 8:51 AM on September 13 [1 favorite]


DarlingBri do you mean the synonym for pancakes or the sweet rectangular bar made with oats?
posted by brujita at 8:53 AM on September 13


Texas toast or maybe a bagel instead of the fried bread.

Oh, duh, just occurred to me: Frybread instead of fried bread.
posted by Rock Steady at 9:13 AM on September 13 [4 favorites]


"Typical" US flavors that come to mind that aren't humorously overprocessed grossness include maple syrup, pecans, fresh corn and dried cornmeal, hatch chiles, a big ol' grilled steak, sourdough bread, peanuts, the Cajun trinity of onion bell pepper and celery, coffee, okra, salmon, watermelon.

Think a combination of north and central american foods with a strong current of african influence. Because of the history of trade and colonization and all that icky stuff you might have good luck finding a lot of american-ish ingredients in markets that cater to other immigrant communities near you, like for example an Indian market is likely to have okra and many spices that overlap onto Central American flavors like cumin and coriander.

Aaaaanyway what I'm saying is do okra gumbo and put it in a pasty that you've made with a sourdough starter, and make a peanut maple chile bacon butty.

Holy shit, a peanut maple chile bacon butty.
posted by Mizu at 9:17 AM on September 13 [8 favorites]


Actually, one of my favorite uses of Thanksgiving leftovers is Turkey Shepherd's pie. Layer of shredded cooked Turkey on the bottom, pour gravy over it. Add layers of leftover veggies (definitely includes corn but also whatever is in the fridge) top with mashed potatoes. Bake until bubbling and top of mashed potatoes starts to turn golden at the edges.
posted by Green Eyed Monster at 9:20 AM on September 13 [3 favorites]


If it’s for Bonfire Night, I wonder if it would be possible to do maple syrup toffee apples? Or toffee pumpkin?
posted by Bloxworth Snout at 9:29 AM on September 13


Maybe you could Briticise s’mores by using hobnobs or ginger nuts or something?
posted by Bloxworth Snout at 9:31 AM on September 13 [1 favorite]


Peanut butter banoffee pie. I want this in my face now.
posted by tchemgrrl at 9:34 AM on September 13 [3 favorites]


Spotted Dock with cranberries.

Turkey reads as American. Perhaps a Cornish meat pie with Turkey filling.

Are chocolate chips American? Toll House cookies with English toffee chunks instead of chips.
posted by SemiSalt at 9:41 AM on September 13


Deep-frying foods becomes geographically hazy; occasionally I'll be at somewhere like the state fair in Iowa, or a chippy in Glasgow, see something and think "Didn't I see that at the other place?". Deep fried cheesecake on a stick was good; deep fried cherry pie on a stick would also be relatively easy to make if you have a fryer (a standard cherry pie from a Tesco bakery is substantial enough and cheap).

I half-drank/half-ate (it was thick) Chocolate Lard Milkshake in a Santa Monica place in uh October 2008 and it tasted amazing, even though it felt like some kind of reverse liposuction procedure and it nearly made a re-appearance during an unwise ride on the Santa Monica pier ferris wheel shortly afterwards. That could work! Alternately, an easy one would be pancakes but with maple syrup and Ben and Jerry's, or if you can get it Cold Stone Creamery ice cream. And maybe replace the pancakes with waffles, though they have to be thick ones (UK supermarket waffles often seem to be almost disappointingly transparent in their lack of substance).

The orange creamsicle - a glass of orange juice with a jug of cream poured in, and a whipped cream topping - has intrigued, but have not yet tried it. The combination of juice and cream may cause some English people to run screaming from the room.

(This is my favorite thread across all of MetaFilter so far this year - thank you, tractorfeed)
posted by Wordshore at 9:47 AM on September 13 [3 favorites]


Building upon tchemgrrl's idea, what about Peanut butter AND FLUFF banoffee pie.
posted by PuppetMcSockerson at 9:54 AM on September 13 [5 favorites]


Bacon butty but with streaky bacon. Still delicious. This is how I make them in the US because I'm too lazy to get Canadian bacon for the moments when I am overpowered with British nostalgia and need a bacon sandwich.

Iced tea. Extra sweet. In teacups instead of glasses. Enjoy the horror you provoke.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 10:42 AM on September 13 [9 favorites]


Building upon tchemgrrl's idea, what about Peanut butter AND FLUFF banoffee pie.

I raise you one Chocolate Peanut Butter Banoffee Pie. I suppose you could substitute the whipped cream for some whipped marshmallow fluff if you wanted to be extra hardcore, but I think my teeth just sprouted a cavity thinking about the possibility.
posted by PearlRose at 10:43 AM on September 13 [1 favorite]


You could definitely do a Cornish pasty with turkey, squash (or potatoes or sweet potatoes), and corn. I'd add a little gravy (as turkey's a bit dry). You could add a cranberry relish as a side/topping/dip. Those are all New World foods in addition to being pretty stereotypically American.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 10:48 AM on September 13 [3 favorites]


(This is my favorite thread across all of MetaFilter so far this year - thank you, tractorfeed)

Hell, I've flagged it as "fantastic" and am hoping it shows up in the sidebar.

I assumed you were in the US trying to adapt, let me go the other way and see how to approach this from the UK.

* I even more so think that the pumpkin or peanut butter approach would work. (Although, there's a bit of a rumor that a lot of the "pumpkin" stuff in US stores and restaurants is actually butternut squash, which is very similar culinarily; if you wanted to cheat that way I'll never tell.)

* I just did a Google search to see if peanut butter whipped cream was a thing, in case you just wanted to use that as the whipped cream element of a Victoria sponge. It is indeed a thing. And that gave me a great idea - one of the very classic US childhood sandwiches is peanut butter and grape jam. So - make the peanut butter whipped cream, and use that plus grape jam in a Victoria sponge.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 11:10 AM on September 13 [5 favorites]


Obtain potato waffles. Serve with copious beef gravy made to resemble maple syrup.
posted by quacks like a duck at 11:36 AM on September 13 [2 favorites]


OK I can't claim any credit for this one; so far as I know it was invented by someone from the canteen where I work.

Split large fish fillets in half lengthways so they are very long and thin. Fry them in batter a la chip shop.

Put them in hot dog buns with tartare sauce on and call it a "Fish Dog".
posted by quacks like a duck at 11:46 AM on September 13 [1 favorite]


Peanut butter and blackcurrant jam.
posted by brujita at 11:50 AM on September 13


Get some nachos, put shepherd's pie filling on there, top with grated cheddar and put a dollop of mushy peas on the side. Slice up some spring onions and use the green bits to make something that looks vaguely like sliced up chillis.
posted by quacks like a duck at 11:57 AM on September 13


Cheeseburger pasties (to make them less empanada-like).

Also nachos, but use rarebit poured over the corn crisps instead of the usual cheeses.
posted by Karmakaze at 11:57 AM on September 13


Yeah, people in the UK see peanut butter as being super American, which is not my perception as an American. I remember watching an episode of the British version of The Apprentice and they made food with different country themes, and their American food was a peanut butter sandwich. I had to laugh since I can't think of anyone over the age of 12 who eats peanut butter sandwiches here. For me, when I think of British food, I think of meat pies and pasties.

So... I think anything Mexican can really be considered American -- salsa is more popular than ketchup these days as the USA's No. 1 condiment and Americans don't view Mexican food as "ethnic food" or "un-American" at all -- so maybe you can make a Mexican-inspired meat pie?
posted by AppleTurnover at 12:00 PM on September 13 [1 favorite]


I think I've seen the things that quacks like a duck and karmakaze described as "Irish nachos" somehwere (where you use corn chips as the base). However, when I googled that phrase I came across yet another variant - where you use thin-sliced-and-fried potato as the base. There are variants that use traditional nacho toppings (salsa, jalapeno, sour cream, cheese) and some that use "Irish" toppings (corned beef, shepherd's pie filling, etc.) with cheddar cheese.

So that's yet another option.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 12:01 PM on September 13 [1 favorite]


I am currently imagining a turducken composed of a goose stuffed with a duck stuffed with a pheasant.
posted by mce at 12:57 PM on September 13 [2 favorites]


Deep fried Mars bars. (You would use a Milky Way.)

Speaking as an American, I'm a bit puzzled as to which is the American part and which is the British part. The US has deep fried Snickers bars (though they are a niche food in the "state fair" category), and Mars and Milky Way bars are available at most gas stations, Walmarts, etc.

A British food familiar to Terry Pratchett readers would be the thing in a bun -- could use turkey, cranberry, pumpkin, or I suppose peanut butter would be most appropriate.
posted by yohko at 1:02 PM on September 13 [1 favorite]


A British food familiar to Terry Pratchett readers would be the thing in a bun -- could use turkey, cranberry, pumpkin, or I suppose peanut butter would be most appropriate.
In that vein how about a 'rat pie' made of hotdogs & cheetos?
posted by mce at 1:06 PM on September 13


Haggis-stuffed jalapeno poppers
Yorkshire puddings served with PB&J
Spam and spam jelly pork pies
Canned tuna kedgeree
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide at 1:18 PM on September 13


Speaking as an American, I'm a bit puzzled as to which is the American part and which is the British part.

Deep fried Mars Bars are a UK food. They were invented in a chipper in Scotland. The Mars Bars in the US are not proper Mars Bars and should be substituted.
posted by DarlingBri at 1:21 PM on September 13 [4 favorites]


Are you aiming to shock?

A ketchup and hotdog curry. With naan.
posted by srboisvert at 1:41 PM on September 13 [1 favorite]


Giant burritos filled with thickened beef stew instead of carnitas.
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide at 2:01 PM on September 13


American cheese and Branston Pickle sandwiches.
posted by DarlingBri at 2:03 PM on September 13


Whitechapel Fatburgers!
(warning for anyone who isn't China Miéville: first Guardian link opens to picture of 130-tonne agglomeration of fat and refuse)
posted by miles per flower at 2:03 PM on September 13 [1 favorite]


Re: smores made with digestives/hobnobs instead of graham crackers - I have personally tried these and they work well.

I have also personally tried Yorkshire puddings with sawmill gravy - which are fantastic.

Have not tried, but will suggest cottage pie with cornbread topping, fish pie with grits (as a takeoff on shrimp and grits), and banana pudding trifle.

Mini-rostis (not to be confused with mini-roasties) could be a stand in for tater tots. I've seen them in the frozen food section near the frozen chips.
posted by penguinicity at 3:45 PM on September 13


I think this is relevant. Marks and Spencer here in the UK have just started selling "Detroit Style" pizzas, with ingredients which seem to be American (though I need go check a box for the country of origin). Best descriptions I can find - friends in Michigan are sending somewhat negative appraisals back.
posted by Wordshore at 5:11 PM on September 13


backseatpilot: "I would consider pumpkin and peanut butter to be very American ingredients."

I've made pumpkin shepherd's pie and it was amazing! It was years ago but I think I may have used this recipe.
posted by capricorn at 7:33 PM on September 13 [1 favorite]


Turkey Wellington.
Arbroath Smokie Chowder.
posted by the duck by the oboe at 8:40 PM on September 13 [1 favorite]


Nachos made with Heinz baked beans
Diner classic: tuna sandwich with potato chips (fish and chips)
Lox and bagels (salmon tea sandwiches)
Mini American-style meatloaf with a hard-boiled edd in the center (scotch egg)
Pigs in a Blanket (sausage roll)
posted by Room 641-A at 10:54 PM on September 13


Some kind of US-flavoured crumble? Pumpkin crumble would be the obvious choice (and would be nice, I think), but pumpkin can’t be the only suitably American filling. Sweet potato crumble? Cherry crumble? Key lime crumble?
posted by Bloxworth Snout at 3:15 AM on September 14 [2 favorites]


Lemon Drizzle buttermilk pancakes.

Cajun andouille sausage roll.

Philly tikka cheesesteak.


also you can find something very similar to tatertots in British supermarkets, they are just triangular in shape and called hash browns.
posted by koolkat at 6:01 AM on September 14 [1 favorite]


Flag cake with gooseberries, currents and lemon curd. (Of course, you can't do a Union Jack in those colors, but maybe Wales' dragon?)

Mission burrito with Heinz baked beans, salad creme, red Leicester, and piccalilli.

99 with a Peanut butter Twix instead of a Flake.
posted by Diablevert at 7:44 AM on September 14


Might get some ideas from Illegal Jack's, a Scottish take on Tex-Mex - I loved their haggis burrito!
posted by Devika at 8:42 AM on September 14 [1 favorite]


What could be Americanised from a Sunday Roast?
posted by MattWPBS at 11:13 AM on September 14


British food in triple portions. #zing
posted by doctornecessiter at 7:30 AM on September 15 [4 favorites]


Bagel with marmite
posted by Mchelly at 8:41 AM on September 15 [1 favorite]


Lobster, corn blueberries, Tex-mex, maple, peanut butter, Doritos, Barbecue, 'buffalo'
American sausage is generally all meat, British sausage usually has a fair amount of grain added.
- Bangers & mash- use taco hamburg and sweet potatoes. (taco seasoning = flour, chili powder & salt).
- Lobster pie
- Corn & blueberry scones.
- Beans on toast - Chili up some red beans, serve on the worst wonderbread you can find.
- Most of what I've read about shapes is pretty scary, but some sort of British approach to Jello/jelly with mini-marshmallows.
- I make shepherds pie with taco hamburg (above), 1 can corn = 1 can creamed corn, mashed potatoes with jalapeno cheese.
- Sunday Roast - Coat the roast liberally with barbecue rub
- Roast potatoes - douse potatoes with Tabasco hot sauce and olive oil, then roas
posted by theora55 at 8:50 AM on September 15 [1 favorite]


I can't find any specific examples online, but in S3 of Arrested Development there's a restaurant in Wee Britian called Fat Ammy's that serves "American" food. If I recall, a lot of the jokes refer to things like portion size but there might be some examples there.
posted by Room 641-A at 9:46 AM on September 15


Butter Chicken pizza is very common in our grocery shops - it is more the UK-style butter chicken than Indian Butter chicken

Dense pound cake sliced thin like French fries and served in individual MacDonalds fries boxes served with a side of raspberry jelly (better yet, assemble a "happy meal" with real boxes and one of the up-thread hamburger suggestions)

My favourite hamburger right now is served with a hard cheese and peace preserves in lieu of relish and other traditional toppings
posted by saucysault at 2:48 PM on September 15 [1 favorite]


Perhaps wash it down with this abomination.
posted by Wordshore at 10:22 AM on September 16


When I was fresh out of college, I was hired on by a subsidiary of a British conglomerate, and sent to the Midlands for training.

At the canteen, they always had fried eggs, mashed potatoes, and usually hamburger. One day, they also had something they claimed was chili - it was a clear soup rather than the opaque stew I'm used to.

Something clicked in my head, and I decided to have a bit of Midwest USA in the Midlands UK. A greasy spoon in my hometown had something they called a "slinger" - hamburger, eggs, hash browns, cover it all with chili. So I asked the lady in the canteen for a burger...with some fried eggs on top...and some mashed potatoes on that...OK, cover it all with that chili.

In a fit of pique, the guy in line behind me (a local) ordered the same. And the guy behind him.

As of two years ago (when I last caught up with one fellow I'd taken the training with), it was still something of an in-house specialty.

So there you have it - American diner fare, done up British style.
posted by notsnot at 7:31 PM on September 16 [5 favorites]


Provide plenty of tea - but make it with coffee.
posted by Paul Slade at 7:02 AM on September 21 [1 favorite]


There are so many great ideas here -- exceeding my already high expectations. I can't mark best answers because I'd have to tick them all. I will say, however, that I have met with my chef friend who is catering our extravaganza, and we are definitely going to make some of the fantastic ideas in this thread. And for anyone from near or far who has contributed to or even read this thread, if you're interested in attending a fancy dress (US: costume) party in Coventry on the fourth of November which involves shedloads of fireworks and many of the above-mentioned foods, you are very very cordially welcome. Memail me.
posted by tractorfeed at 2:09 PM on September 23 [2 favorites]


Please let us know afterwards what you made and how it tasted!
posted by EndsOfInvention at 2:33 PM on September 23 [1 favorite]


Popcorn is uniquely North American. Popcorn with some kind of black currant candy coating. (As Black Currants are banned in the US)
posted by Megafly at 4:30 PM on September 25


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