The end?
February 18, 2007 8:54 PM   Subscribe

How does one say "The End" in other languages?

I'm asking on behalf of a friend for an art project wherein he simulates scenes from the end of movies where the words "The End" traditionally scroll up the screen... He was thinking it would be cool to make it multi-lingual, and we immediately thought of "Fin" but what other languages could we use? How else have you guys seen movies ended? Thanks in advance!
posted by garethspor to Writing & Language (30 answers total) 5 users marked this as a favorite
 
Russian: конец (pronounced "konetz").
posted by kickingtheground at 8:59 PM on February 18, 2007


It's your friend.
posted by Burhanistan at 9:01 PM on February 18, 2007


yes,yes i know i we can easily translate the words using dictionaries and websites and such, but i'm specifically looking for which words would conventionally be used at the end of a movie, i.e. "fin" in french as opposed to "l'extrémité" which is what google gives me when i put "the end" and hit translate from english to french.
posted by garethspor at 9:06 PM on February 18, 2007


Malay and Indonesian: Tamat.
posted by Xere at 9:08 PM on February 18, 2007


IIRC, in German it would be Ende.
posted by !Jim at 9:14 PM on February 18, 2007


punjabi: Katham
swahili: Ame kwisha
posted by gadha at 9:18 PM on February 18, 2007


"Einde" in Dutch.
posted by easternblot at 9:25 PM on February 18, 2007


In Icelandic: endir
posted by grapefruitmoon at 9:40 PM on February 18, 2007


終 or おわり in Japanese (pronounced owari), though many use "Fin".
posted by birdsquared at 9:47 PM on February 18, 2007


Per the fiancee:

Cebuano - "Nahuman Na"
Tagalog - "Tapos Na"
posted by nathan_teske at 9:54 PM on February 18, 2007


Wan, or 完 would be your bet for the end of a Chinese movie, IIRC. Although it's not very typical for the end of fairy tales and such, which is where I would assume "the end" would be put at.

Good lord, my grammar is atrocious today. Please forgive.
posted by Phire at 9:55 PM on February 18, 2007


"Slut" in Swedish.
posted by alexei at 9:55 PM on February 18, 2007


i dont know how to write greek characters, but in greek "the end" is "to telos"; at the end of the movie, it would just be "telos". (Τέλος) There, hope that worked.
posted by phaedon at 10:03 PM on February 18, 2007


Tagalog would more literally be rendered, "Ang katapusan."
posted by brownpau at 10:15 PM on February 18, 2007


Armenian: Verch վէրչ
posted by k8t at 10:51 PM on February 18, 2007


Polish: Koniec
posted by Busy Old Fool at 11:34 PM on February 18, 2007


Hungarian: Vége
posted by vac2003 at 11:57 PM on February 18, 2007


Danish: "Slut".
posted by sveskemus at 4:40 AM on February 19, 2007


Turkish; "Son".
posted by caelumluna at 5:02 AM on February 19, 2007


French: Fin
Arabic: An-nihaya
posted by textilephile at 6:21 AM on February 19, 2007


Portuguese: Fim
posted by dmo at 6:33 AM on February 19, 2007


Spanish: fin
posted by DieHipsterDie at 6:40 AM on February 19, 2007


Finnish: loppu
posted by hoskala at 8:09 AM on February 19, 2007


Birdsquared: Japanese films generally use 完 (pronounced "kan", meaning complete) at the end, not 終 (pronounced "shuu", meaning finished). Number 22 on this list.
posted by bakerybob at 8:11 AM on February 19, 2007


Just noticed, the Japanese seem (perhaps not so surprisingly) to use the same character as the Chinese, just with slightly different pronunciation. Two languages for the price of one!
posted by bakerybob at 8:13 AM on February 19, 2007


Czech: konec (pronounced ko-nets)
posted by metajack at 9:19 AM on February 19, 2007


In Korea "끝" (kkeut=the end) rolls on screen, though I can't remember if movies still do this. This might be a bit antiquated. Anyhow, that's what you're looking for. Many times shown like this: —끝—

Bonus: TV shows still do rolling "the end" type of thing, but obviously since it's TV=serial, you'll more commonly see "다음 이시간에" (Daeum ee shigan ae="Next time, at this time"). Then again, now I'm not so sure if shows do this anymore either...
posted by kkokkodalk at 9:35 AM on February 19, 2007


Just watched the end of a Japanese film that used おしまい (oshimai). Got the "owari" from my wife, who watches many more Japanese films than I. She said that "kan" endings are more old-timey.
posted by birdsquared at 11:08 PM on February 19, 2007


In Korea "끝" (kkeut=the end) rolls on screen, though I can't remember if movies still do this.

Yeah, it's still common. I see it all the time. I (incorrectly) thought for the longest time that it was Konglish (since it sounds a lot like 'cut').
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken at 12:30 AM on February 20, 2007


I second birdsquared -- most Japanese movies I've seen that use the "The End" convention use 終わり (or 終り, or simply 終).
posted by armage at 6:08 AM on February 20, 2007


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