Popular, Recent Genre Novels written in Deep POV/Free Indirect Discourse
February 6, 2019 6:41 PM   Subscribe

Specifically, I'm looking for modern genre examples. Not Austen, not Flaubert, but popular novels published within the last ten years, preferably in 3rd Person. I've read lots of book about Deep POV, but I've been unable to find many modern novels written using it. Help!
posted by Chasuk to Writing & Language (6 answers total)
 
Not sure about Deep POV, but GRR Martin's Game of Thrones series is well-known genre fiction that makes heavy use of free indirect discourse.
posted by Bardolph at 6:56 PM on February 6 [1 favorite]


NK Jemisin, The Fifth Season? Narrative voice jumps around a lot, but there's plenty of Deep POV as I recall.
posted by Beardman at 11:09 PM on February 6 [3 favorites]


The Painter of Battles - Arturo Perez Reverte
posted by mannequito at 1:01 AM on February 7 [1 favorite]


I actually think a lot of romance novels might use this. I'll have to go look at some examples (and I had to look up two or three definitions of free indirect discourse before I figured out what you meant, so you might want to explain what it means if you want more answers), but that narrator-spoken internal thought style reminds me of many romance novels.

Sort of like, "What was she doing? She knew better than this. Her mother always, always let her down; how had she expected better this time?" That kind of passage?

Sorry for the questions, and I'll look for specific examples, but if that's what you mean, I think romance novels might be the answer.
posted by gideonfrog at 4:28 AM on February 7 [1 favorite]


IIRC, Eleanor Catton's The Luminaries uses this device frequently. The writing style of the book is deliberately "old-fashioned" in general; the use of free indirect discourse is one of the ways Catton does this.
posted by Johnny Assay at 4:31 AM on February 7 [2 favorites]


>> Sorry for the questions, and I'll look for specific examples, but if that's what you mean, I think romance novels might be the answer.

Sort of like this:

-------

Dwight stood on the hilltop, shivering. Icy wind stung his cheeks. He glanced at his watch: 9:25. You are late again, Blake. Why do you do this to me? Why do I trust you?

Here is a good explanation:

https://emmadarwin.typepad.com/thisitchofwriting/psychic-distance-what-it-is-and-how-to-use-it.html

Emma Darwin uses a different term, but the substance is the same.
posted by Chasuk at 5:26 AM on February 7


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