What is the Proper Way to Prepare a Toothbrush to Brush Your Teeth?
August 7, 2017 9:18 AM   Subscribe

This is an embarrassingly simple question. I am having a disagreement with someone over the proper method of preparing to brush your teeth. We agree that it is either a one-step or two-step process. I take my tooth brush out of the holder, put toothpaste on it and start brushing (one-step). This other person insists that I am leaving out a step. Either before I put the toothpaste on the brush or after, this person insists I should wet the toothbrush (two-step).

It never occurred to me to do it anyway but the one-step. It never occurred to them to do it anyway but the two-step. Neither of us has ever had a dentist or dental hygienist tell us we needed to change our ways when it comes to brushing although neither of us has asked specifically about dry or wet to begin. If you are a dental professional, is there a proper way to prepare to brush your teeth? Also, for those of you who are not dental pros, do you do the dry brush or the wet brush?
posted by AugustWest to Grab Bag (96 answers total) 5 users marked this as a favorite
 
Wet brush - I think it gives me better foaming/ lather.
posted by SyraCarol at 9:20 AM on August 7 [18 favorites]


Not a pro, but I use the quick rinse, apply paste, brush method
posted by Jacen at 9:21 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


I always wet it. Feels rough and unpleasant to brush dry, for me.

WHO IS RIGHT? We learn so much about humanity's weird little corners here.
posted by fingersandtoes at 9:21 AM on August 7 [21 favorites]


The only thing the water might do that I can see is enable the toothpaste to froth up more/faster. Saliva does that as well. You do you. Edit: perhaps this is a holdover from the days of tooth powder?
posted by Emperor SnooKloze at 9:21 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


My dentist said that if you have to choose between water and toothpaste, choose water (not that it's a likely choice to have to make); it's more important to get the brush wet to make it effective. Yes, wet brush.
posted by Sunburnt at 9:21 AM on August 7 [14 favorites]


I wet the brush to get any bathroom funk off of it. This is especially needed if you keep your brush on the counter in the bathroom.
posted by cnc at 9:23 AM on August 7 [4 favorites]


Run brush under the tap, apply paste, brush. A dry brush just sounds... wrong to me. It has never once occurred to me people may not wet the brush. This is why i love ask.mefi.
posted by cgg at 9:23 AM on August 7 [4 favorites]


I actually do a three step process-- wet brush, apply paste, wet paste. I find that doing so allows me to use less toothpaste.
posted by a fiendish thingy at 9:27 AM on August 7 [14 favorites]


I wet the brush, apply toothpaste, wet the brush again, and then brush my teeth. Why? It is a mystery.
posted by Faint of Butt at 9:27 AM on August 7 [12 favorites]


Wet brush, apply toothpaste, brush teeth. Wetting the brush softens the bristles, and helps the toothpaste lather.

The thing I get flack about from my husband is that I brush and rinse with warm water. My teeth have always been sensitive to cold, but to him cold water is the right thing to do!
posted by Serene Empress Dork at 9:29 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


I wet the toothbrush first but not the paste. Wetting it makes it feel less like I just got a mouthful of dry (compared to my mouth) paste.
posted by terretu at 9:31 AM on August 7


Team wet brush.
posted by St. Peepsburg at 9:35 AM on August 7 [1 favorite]


We use baking soda, so if you don't wet the brush, the the baking soda doesn't stick to the brush.
posted by cfraenkel at 9:35 AM on August 7 [5 favorites]


put on the paste, wet the brush + paste, brush my teeth

this is how i do it and everyone who does it differently is Wrong
posted by sockermom at 9:36 AM on August 7 [11 favorites]


I wet the toothbrush first to soften the bristles. No matter how well I rinse my toothbrush, it's always slightly stiff from previously applied toothpaste. Because I use an electric toothbrush, stiff bristles would hurt my gums, which are already tender due to periodontal disease. I've never had a cavity in my life, so I guess wetting the brush first is fine.
posted by xyzzy at 9:39 AM on August 7


1) apply toothpaste to brush
2) turn shower on
3) get into shower
4) hold entire toothbrush under stream of water to wet bristles
5) brush teeth
posted by coppermoss at 9:44 AM on August 7 [3 favorites]


I have never in my life heard of wetting the brush, either before or after applying toothpaste.
posted by acanthous at 9:46 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


Wet brush, apply toothpaste, brush teeth.

For what it's worth, I soak my toothbrush in hydrogen peroxide overnight once a week to really clean it.
posted by Multicellular Exothermic at 9:47 AM on August 7


Step one wet brush

Step two apply toothpaste

Step three brush teeth

Step four rinse toothbrush clean, ruffling with finger to get any gunk loose

Step five put toothbrush back away, far far away from the sink or any other unfriendly zone
posted by tilde at 9:48 AM on August 7 [1 favorite]


I've further subdivided the In The Bathroom category of MefiWiki::YouWHAT. I hope you people are happy.
posted by zamboni at 9:48 AM on August 7 [41 favorites]


Rinse brush, apply toothpaste, wet the brush and toothpaste, and then brush my teeth. Yeah, I know it's redundant, but when I try skipping the second rinse, the toothpaste is too gooey. Ugh.
posted by tuesdayschild at 9:50 AM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Wet brush. Always.
posted by anderjen at 9:51 AM on August 7


Dry brush here.
posted by mmascolino at 9:55 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


Wet brush, paste, brush. Nthing wet brush softens the bristles.

Also a monthly overnight soak in hydrogen peroxide.
posted by soundguy99 at 10:03 AM on August 7


I wet it but the other person needs to back off.
posted by brujita at 10:05 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


Wet brush. Remember from the recent political megathread that 27% of the population is crazy, so you can safely disregard any dry brush answers until they hit 28%.
posted by whitewall at 10:07 AM on August 7 [4 favorites]


You people who wet the brush first: How do you keep the toothpaste from sliding right off the brush?

I'm a firm believer in wetting the brush *after* applying the toothpaste. Although my husband wets the brush first, and we've coexisted for twenty years without (yet) coming to blows over the matter.
posted by DrGail at 10:09 AM on August 7


I always wet the brush first. I get the heebie jeebies whenever I forget to. Just doesn't leave me feeling like I did a good enough job brushing.
posted by Hermione Granger at 10:09 AM on August 7


I just dampen it and the bristles provide enough traction.
posted by brujita at 10:20 AM on August 7


Rinse the brush, put on toothpaste, wet the toothpaste.

Warm water for all steps.

As far as the toothpaste sliding off the wet brush I use the pea-sized amount I read in the instructions on a tube a long time ago so it just sinks slightly onto the bristles. It's not enough to slide off.
posted by winna at 10:20 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


I wet the brush first. I really don't like the feeling of toothpaste on a dry brush, but I also think the water helps it foam better so it's easier to distribute over my teeth. It's like washing your hair--you wet your hair first, because it would be more difficult to get the shampoo to lather and be distributed evenly if you applied the shampoo directly to dry hair.
posted by hurdy gurdy girl at 10:24 AM on August 7 [3 favorites]


There are people don't wet the brush first??? It's the only way to do it? My world was smaller but more perfect before today.
posted by hapaxes.legomenon at 10:31 AM on August 7 [4 favorites]


You people who wet the brush first: How do you keep the toothpaste from sliding right off the brush?

Embed the toothpaste (push it into the bristles) as you're applying it, instead of having a stripe of it sitting on top. Then it can't slide off, and will distribute more evenly as you're brushing. (On preview, seconding winna on this, plus I think it works with larger amounts too.)
posted by hsieu at 10:32 AM on August 7


You people who wet the brush first: How do you keep the toothpaste from sliding right off the brush?

I dunno, it just . . . . doesn't?

I'm a firm believer in wetting the brush *after* applying the toothpaste.

OTOH, on the rare occasion when I'm super tired or otherwise spaced out and forget to wet the brush first, wetting after usually knocks the paste off.
posted by soundguy99 at 10:33 AM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Team Wetpaste.
posted by Rock Steady at 10:34 AM on August 7


Wet brush, apply paste, brush teeth, rinse brush, leave toothbrush hanging out in my bathroom like I was some sort of animal. Repeat tomorrow.
posted by jessamyn at 10:35 AM on August 7 [1 favorite]


NOT ONE OF THOSE QUESTIONS AGAIN

...Team Wet Brush

(dry is icky and doesn't lather.)
posted by Omnomnom at 10:38 AM on August 7


I was taught as a child to apply paste, then wet the brush. It had not previously occurred to me that a person could do otherwise.
posted by darchildre at 10:45 AM on August 7


I am very disappointed to announce that the ADA's official Brushing Your Teeth video and accompanying How To Brush instructions [pdf warning] skip this question entirely and begin with the brush already in final tooth approach.

Team wet brush (and cold water).
posted by solotoro at 10:53 AM on August 7 [3 favorites]


I know someone who squeezes toothpaste directly on their tongue, then goes in with the toothbrush (which may or may not be wet, I'm not sure.) So maybe you're all wrong.
posted by ApathyGirl at 10:55 AM on August 7 [9 favorites]


I have been Team Dry Brush, Team Wet Brush and Team Wet Paste at various points. I don't really have a preference. (Re Team Dry Brush--I have enough spit that the paste lathers fine usually.)

Never done Toothpaste Tongue though--very exotic ApathyGirl!
posted by purple_bird at 11:00 AM on August 7


I always wet my brush, but it can't possibly matter one way or another. Certainly one isn't more correct that the other.
posted by humboldt32 at 11:00 AM on August 7 [1 favorite]


OTOH, on the rare occasion when I'm super tired or otherwise spaced out and forget to wet the brush first, wetting after usually knocks the paste off.

What are you using, a fire hose? A little dampening from a friendly faucet is all you need.

Team wet brush here.
posted by Elly Vortex at 11:13 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


When backpacking or camping with limited water, a great challenge of the late night, tired from doing something all day, using a headlamp that might be fading because you forgot new (or recharged) batteries routine is wetting the toothbrush without wasting too much water. I've tried skipping it - just no.
posted by lab.beetle at 11:35 AM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Team dry brush here. Years ago I found that leaving the brush dry reduced the chances of toothpaste foaming so much it would drip on my shirt. Before that, I could only brush my teeth while wearing pajamas because of the frequency of toothpaste-on-shirt-necessitating-a-wardrobe-change incidents.
posted by Is It Over Yet? at 11:35 AM on August 7


I am on team wet brush/apply paste/wet paste/brush teeth.
posted by clone boulevard at 11:35 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


I use the pea-sized amount I read in the instructions on a tube a long time ago

as opposed to the huge full-length stripe in the illustration. Yet again, advantage Team Text.

Wet brush.
posted by flabdablet at 11:37 AM on August 7 [4 favorites]


Also, it's usually not just "wet brush", but more of a "Rinse brush off kind of thoroughly, and sometimes even run fingernail over bristles to make sure it's pretty clean to start, then apply paste and wet that."
posted by clone boulevard at 11:37 AM on August 7 [2 favorites]


I know someone who squeezes toothpaste directly on their tongue, then goes in with the toothbrush (which may or may not be wet, I'm not sure.) So maybe you're all wrong.

My favorite part of these kinds of threads is when I inevitably confront an answer that makes my jaw drop.

Toothpaste is generally not toxic these days but you still don't want to use more than you have to. I don't see how squeezing it onto your tongue lets you meter how much you are using.
posted by winna at 11:40 AM on August 7 [4 favorites]


Wet the brush.

Dry brush is analogous to wiping standing up. You are gonna get the oral equivalent of skidmarks because you are half assing it.
posted by Sternmeyer at 12:02 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Nightly steps in the googly household:

(1) Turn on faucet.
(2) Apply water to dry brush.
(3) Turn off faucet, just as the offspring places toothbrush under faucet.
(4) Turn faucet back on.
(5) Apply water to the offspring's dry brush.
(6) Turn faucet back off.
(7) Argue with the offspring about turning off water before we have brushed teeth since we will require water for rinsing.
(8) Apply toothpaste to wet brushes, brush, rinse.

Conclusion: not only do I employ the Clearly Correct Wet Brush Method, but I also pass on this Important Knowledge to the next generation.
posted by googly at 12:55 PM on August 7 [4 favorites]


Wet first, with WARM water. And keep your lips more or less sealed around the brush so you don't dribble or spatter everywhere. Especially if it's an electric toothbrush. Especially if you're married to me.
posted by HotToddy at 12:57 PM on August 7


I used to wet it (after applying toothpaste - I thought I was wetting the toothpaste, not the brush, so the alternative order doesn't even make sense to me).

But then I discovered that brushing with a dry brush means I don't foam crazily at the mouth like a rabid animal and drool horrible toothpaste spit all over the sink, horrifying anyone else in the bathroom. So I do it the other way now, which I thought was much more civilized until I saw the answer above about a dentist saying the water actually matters.

Now I'm going to have to change back again.
posted by lollusc at 1:24 PM on August 7


Another wet brusher. If it foams up too much you're using way too much toothpaste. Pea size is enough, applied firmly into the bristles.
posted by a humble nudibranch at 1:43 PM on August 7


1. Rinse brush
2. Add toothpaste
3. Add peroxide tooth gel
or
3. Dip brush into activated charcoal
4. Brush teeth
5. Rinse brush
6. Rinse mouth
6a. If using charcoal that day, rinse 3 more times, because otherwise ew, black saliva.
posted by MexicanYenta at 1:54 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Wet brush, apply paste, brush teeth.

Wetting the paste before brushing sounds good but in practice I turn the water on much too high and the paste falls off.

I wonder if wet/dry/wet again differs by toothbrush type? I use an electric toothbrush .
posted by esoterrica at 2:19 PM on August 7


Whoa... this thread changed how I brushed my teeth today. I used to wet only after paste, never before. Well today I did both. Had I even lived until this moment?
posted by wreckofthehesperus at 2:21 PM on August 7 [3 favorites]


It depends on your toothpaste and brush. The toothpaste i use (weleda sole, it is salt based) requires a dry brush as per instructions in the box the tube comes in, as it has no foam producing component and the ingredients stimulate saliva production. Rinse afterwards obviously. Also i use a very soft brush so hard bristles are not an issue.
posted by 15L06 at 2:35 PM on August 7


Wet brush, apply paste, brush teeth. In my mind, rinsing the brush is necessary to clean it.

Unless I'm camping, in which case I don't wet the brush because I'm trying to conserve water. Saliva gets it wet anyway after a few seconds of brushing.
posted by Anticipation Of A New Lover's Arrival, The at 2:44 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


I always dry brush, and my toothbrush is currently stored on the bathroom countertop, even though de-nastying the brush is the most compelling argument I've yet heard for wetting it.
posted by Carouselle at 2:58 PM on August 7


Wet brush. The last certainty in a rapidly changing world.
posted by LingeringMoon at 3:15 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Wet brush , hot water worked into bristles to soften them. Use Water Pik to clean brush after I'm done. I know.
posted by coldhotel at 3:46 PM on August 7


1. Rinse with hottest water to soften and de-funk
2. Rinse with cold water for fresh cold water mouthfeel
3. Apply paste
4. Brush
posted by tenderly at 3:50 PM on August 7


Wet brush, wet paste (if I remember).
posted by jadepearl at 4:45 PM on August 7


Wet brush, apply paste, brush teeth.

(Dry toothbrush feel is bleh.)
posted by velvet_n_purrs at 5:10 PM on August 7


Dry brush with toothpaste on it. Why would you do anything else?
posted by SLC Mom at 5:19 PM on August 7 [2 favorites]


Do you have saliva in your mouth? If so, it doesn't matter.
posted by mmagin at 5:39 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Toothbrush bristles are made of nylon. Water acts as a plasticizer for nylon (it gets in between the polymer chains, shoving them apart resulting in a softer, more flexible material). Giving the brush a quick blast from the faucet beforehand does make a difference in the actual physical properties of the bristles, because you're providing enough water to effectively plasticize the whole toothbrush. That's why nylon specifically has been the bristle choice for toothbrushes for as long as it has.
posted by AgreeableAnne at 6:21 PM on August 7 [10 favorites]


Put brush in cup. Apply a tiny amount of dish soap. Rinse all the dish soap out. Fill cup with water for after brushing. Apply toothpaste.
posted by bleep at 6:32 PM on August 7


1. Clean brush under running water with the ball of my thumb
2. Add toothpaste*
3. Dip entoothpasted brush head briefly in cup of water
4. Clean teeth

If you're super paranoid and/or want to keep automatic toothbrush heads longer, after you clean the brush head off after brushing, dip in a jar of isopropanol/2-propanol/rubbing alcohol (70%) and allow to air dry.

*binder clips are awesome at keeping toothpaste tubes rolled up, now that they're plastic and don't come in metal
posted by porpoise at 6:33 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Look, people, this is a solved problem but here is a handy video clue for the clueless.
posted by tel3path at 6:43 PM on August 7


Wet brush, apply toothpaste, wet brush again, scrub. I also brush and rinse with warm water; cold water hurts my teeth.
posted by sarcasticah at 7:17 PM on August 7


*binder clips are awesome at keeping toothpaste tubes rolled up, now that they're plastic and don't come in metal

Thank you for this! I've been super annoyed at my unruly tube recently.
posted by Serene Empress Dork at 7:28 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Especially if you're in a low humidity era, there isn't much/any rusting or anything.

Otherwise, I could see hair scrunchy-like micro butterfly clips? But the spring tends to be super weak.
posted by porpoise at 7:36 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


But, but... I don't brush my teeth in the bathroom. I brush my teeth in the bedroom because I don't store my toothbrush in the bathroom what with all the flying fecal coliforms.... I only bring my toothbrush and me to a sink when it's time to spit! You mean I have to wet the brush before I put the toothpaste on it??

Okay, from now on I will suck on my toothbrush before I apply the toothpaste.
posted by Jane the Brown at 8:36 PM on August 7 [2 favorites]


Ooh, I only wet the brush after I've applied the paste. I'm going to try wetting it beforehand tonight!

(Also, who else brushes in the shower?)
posted by Defying Gravity at 8:47 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


Wet brush, apply paste, wet brush again if I'm using a manual toothbrush; I don't usually bother with my battery-operated brush because the vibration moves the initial water around the paste enough. Toothpaste (though maybe not gel) wouldn't stick properly to a dry toothbrush, would it? (And then I completely rinse my toothbrush and then put it in the "dental drawer" in a way that the brush part can't touch anything.)
posted by The Wrong Kind of Cheese at 9:12 PM on August 7


Hey foamy toothpaste droolers: did you know that you can spit the excess foam out partway through brushing? You can preempt the drooling!
posted by medusa at 9:43 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


I set up he brush after the paste is on it. Then I really paste after I wash it down the drain. I also squeeze from the middle of the tube but berate others for doing the same.

Now that you bring it up, though, the dentist doesn't wet the brush. It feels very dry.
posted by chapps at 10:26 PM on August 7


Umm... all of the above? Except slurping toothpaste straight from the tube. I don't think I'll try that. Nope.
More important, the toothbrush is in a cabinet, drying on a clip, away from any aerial assaults. And thrown out periodically, or after a cold.
Any thoughts on rinsing the mouth with water after brushing? Cause I do that. Otherwise, my throat gets dry and scratchy.
posted by TrishaU at 10:39 PM on August 7


It absolutely does not matter a whit. Do what you like. Both of you.
posted by desuetude at 10:50 PM on August 7 [1 favorite]


In the name of objective research, I just tried the Slurp. And it's Monday night and all ya'll are making my teeth feel gritty.
It was different. It may be my go-to method before visiting the dentist, because I can't even begin to say how much brushing and rinsing it took to get the wad of Colgate out of my mouth. But I'm minty, very very minty.
I suggest we all try the Slurp, just once. Do it for science.
posted by TrishaU at 11:04 PM on August 7 [3 favorites]


I wet the brush before and after adding the toothpaste. It's more about the feel of cool water when I first start brushing. A few nights ago I accidentally used warm water and it was horrible.

This thread is making me wish I was still in touch with my ex-girlfriend who used to get irrationally irritated by my toothbrushing habits - "you're washing all the toothpaste off!"
posted by neilb449 at 4:39 AM on August 8 [2 favorites]


Any thoughts on rinsing the mouth with water after brushing? Cause I do that. Otherwise, my throat gets dry and scratchy.

I know this one!! I was a post-brush mouth-rinser all my life and then my dentist explained you're not supposed to do that, I've been rinsing all the fluoride off. Just spit! (I have managed to get used to this, although it was horrifying at first.)
posted by fingersandtoes at 6:22 AM on August 8 [1 favorite]


Hey foamy toothpaste droolers: did you know that you can spit the excess foam out partway through brushing? You can preempt the drooling!

Of course, but its such an ingrained routine that I don't always pay 100% attention and before you know it BAM! toothpaste everywhere.

If it foams up too much you're using way too much toothpaste. Pea size is enough, applied firmly into the bristles.

Even with a pea-sized amount maybe my toothpaste is super foamy or my mouth is unusually small or saliva-producing. I also just realized that in trying to make sure I don't swallow any toothpaste (which is both gag-inducing for me and you're not supposed to), I'm probably forcing the foam to the front of my mouth, thus increasing the likelihood of spillage.
posted by Is It Over Yet? at 9:35 AM on August 8


In our house, Spouse wets the brush, applies paste, then brushes.

I apply paste, then wet the brush, then brush.

Either is correct, but I can't fathom doing it his way and he can't fathom doing it my way. But we both agree that Wet is Right.
posted by devinemissk at 2:54 PM on August 8


One day, when everyone needs seed material to generate AI, ask.metafilter is going to be of interest.
posted by porpoise at 11:04 PM on August 8


Hey foamy toothpaste droolers: did you know that you can spit the excess foam out partway through brushing? You can preempt the drooling!

If we're up to the part where we exchange One Weird Tricks: raising your eyes to the ceiling instead of leaning over to look at yourself more closely in the bathroom mirror will tip your head back to the extent required to make the drool stay put instead of falling out the front.

You've brushed your teeth thousands of times. If you still need to see the process happening in the mirror to be sure you're doing it right, you've never been doing it right.
posted by flabdablet at 2:10 AM on August 9


The One Weird Trick for camping wet-brushers: apply toothpaste to dry brush, sip a small amount of water and keep it in your mouth, stick brush in and go from there
posted by Leona at 8:09 AM on August 9


Wet brush. Otherwise it's kind of like using body wash on dry skin.
posted by Room 641-A at 10:45 AM on August 9


Humor website cracked.com says wet brush first

http://www.cracked.com/article_24992_6-weirdly-specific-things-movies-thinks-people-in-bathrooms.html
posted by Jacen at 7:24 AM on August 13


1. Wet brush.
2. Apply baking soda.
3. Brush bottom teeth for thirty seconds.
4. Brush top teeth for thirty seconds.
5. Apply toothpaste.
6. Brush bottom teeth for thirty seconds.
7. Brush top teeth for thirty seconds.
8. Use tongue brush to scrape muck off entire tongue, including the way way back.
9. Rinse.
posted by Johnny Wallflower at 11:22 PM on August 14


Wetting brush before adding toothpaste makes more sense. Water first means you get water in among the bristles; a brush is fairly good at holding on to water due to water's physical properties.

When you put the toothpaste on first, any water you add will mostly just roll off the toothpaste into the sink. Some of it will start to form a foam, or just adhere to the surface of the toothpaste, but probably not nearly as much as would be held by the bristles in a water-first scenario.

Aside: I think the 'airborne fecal matter' thing is just a resurfacing of Miasma theory, and is mainly a symptom of the media's general fecklessness around science.
posted by pipeski at 5:06 AM on August 16 [1 favorite]


Wet the brush.

You people who wet the brush first: How do you keep the toothpaste from sliding right off the brush?

Point the toothpaste directly into the bristles, embed a pea-sized amount. If you're doing the big lengthwise ribbon like in the commercial, you're using way too much.
posted by Sys Rq at 1:05 PM on August 18


Any thoughts on rinsing the mouth with water after brushing? Cause I do that. Otherwise, my throat gets dry and scratchy.

What does brushing your teeth have to do with your throat? You're not swallowing toothpaste, are you?
posted by Sys Rq at 1:10 PM on August 18


If you're not rinsing out your mouth with water after brushing, you're inevitably going to be swallowing a bit of toothpaste. That might well irritate your throat. Rinse away, I say.
posted by pipeski at 2:45 AM on August 25


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