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How to deal with sudden changes in the weather?
October 10, 2011 12:48 PM   Subscribe

How to deal with sudden changes in the weather?

When the weather changes suddenly from warm and humid, to cool and dry (or from warm and dry to cool and humid), I feel listless, sleepy, and depressed, and I get headaches that originate at the back of my skull.

Does anyone have any techniques for dealing with this? Taking an Ibuprofen helps, but I usually don't figure it out until about half the day is wasted.

I'm 40 years old. I'm overweight, but not in terrible shape. This condition has gotten worse over the past couple of years.
posted by KokuRyu to Health & Fitness (10 answers total) 6 users marked this as a favorite
 
Sounds like it might be sinus-related to me... maybe try a neti pot? I was recently diagnosed with allergies, and I've been astounded by how much my energy and mood is connected with my sinuses. I was never aware of having sinus problems, either; I thought being sleepy and grumpy all the time was just me! Your list of symptoms definitely sounds familiar.

If the neti pot helps, get thee to an allergist!
posted by vorfeed at 1:00 PM on October 10, 2011


I have a terrible time, too. You might take an antihistamine such as Benadryl (or its local equivalent). It might not help with the sleepiness, but if it helps you sleep by restricting the amount of gunk in your throat, things might be better.

Stay well hydrated. I find that fall is particularly difficult because it feels warm, and I need the cool breezes of the evening, but the air is so dang DRY. Maybe a humidifier would help.
posted by Madamina at 1:10 PM on October 10, 2011


It's not really sinus-related, as far as I know. No gunk in throat or nose. Just general tiredness and lethargy, and, in extreme cases, mild depression (irritableness, dark thoughts, hopelessness). It lasts for the first day of the weather change, or if the weather reverts back to a classic high-pressure system of sunny skies.
posted by KokuRyu at 1:15 PM on October 10, 2011


It probably is allergy related. Change in weather = change in air quality.

Or it might be a tumor.

Have you tried consulting a physician?
posted by Sys Rq at 1:20 PM on October 10, 2011


Not to thread-sit, but one of the things I found out during my recent bout of crap was that some antihistamines, antianxiety and antinausea meds are pretty similar. So Benadryl might actually help keep you a little more calm and a little less spiraling-into-crazy.

And anything that is making you sleep more restlessly will translate into crap at other times of the day, so perhaps you might steer yourself into examining that, even if you feel like you're sleeping okay. I go back and forth between being too hot/having that uncomfortable sheen of sweat and humidity all over to sleeping TOO soundly and being sore.
posted by Madamina at 1:20 PM on October 10, 2011


It's not really sinus-related, as far as I know. No gunk in throat or nose. Just general tiredness and lethargy, and, in extreme cases, mild depression (irritableness, dark thoughts, hopelessness).

That's exactly what I'd have said a month ago -- I'd have sworn up, down, and sideways that I didn't have allergies. It seems that sinus trouble can affect your mood/energy/sleep even if it doesn't cause nasal gunk.
posted by vorfeed at 1:33 PM on October 10, 2011


I agree that sinus troubles don't have to present with obvious gunk. Mine likes to sit in the sinus cavity and not budge or really make its presence known, except for occasional pressure or shortness of breath. headaches play into it to, because of the pressure. A neti pot or a sinus rinse is not expensive and is worth a shot...the fact that this happens with weather changes makes me agree with others that it could be allergy related. I know I am susceptible to weather changes too and I swear by my sinus rinse.
posted by DrGirlfriend at 2:21 PM on October 10, 2011


For me, and many others, rapid changes in barometric pressure trigger migraines. Sometimes the headache part, for me, isn't the defining feature. I'll get super tired-like I have no other choice but to sleep. Solutions? Mostly I just suck it up, although prophylactic meds have helped. The edges of seasons are the worst for me.
posted by atomicstone at 3:42 PM on October 10, 2011


For me, and many others, rapid changes in barometric pressure trigger migraines. Sometimes the headache part, for me, isn't the defining feature. I'll get super tired-like I have no other choice but to sleep. Solutions? Mostly I just suck it up, although prophylactic meds have helped. The edges of seasons are the worst for me.

This is pretty much my condition. Headaches + extreme lethargy. Yesterday I went to sleep at 830 and did not wake up until 930am, which is very unusual. The weather was warm and dry yesterday, and I woke up to pounding rain and a headache.
posted by KokuRyu at 4:44 PM on October 10, 2011


No idea if anyone is reading this, but I brought this up with my doctor, who remarked that it's actually a topic of interest for him. Everyone agrees that changes in barometric pressure can cause joint pain, headaches and mood swings, but no one can explain why. The condition may be linked to baroreceptors, which, as their name suggests, are sensitive to barometric pressure, typically to assist with blood circulation.

But it's unclear why barorecptors would cause joint pain. Since it seems to be tissue-related, my doctor thought that sinus inflammation might be triggering headaches and depression (it all goes away if I take a standard dose of Advil).

In fact, he encouraged me to do some research on the internet and get back to him at my next checkup. Great guy, glad to know him.
posted by KokuRyu at 1:21 PM on March 23, 2012


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