Thesaurus word like "homage to"
February 23, 2009 5:38 PM   Subscribe

Single word that means "to sing the praises of", poss. Greek or Roman in origin. Thinking paean, or ode but not quite.

Actual intended use: after writing several phrases in the style of a particular author saying "(this is going to start sounding like a paean to Mr So-and-So soon)."

Exhausted thesaurus options.
posted by jchinique to Writing & Language (25 answers total) 4 users marked this as a favorite
 
Encomium? Panegyric?
posted by yersinia at 5:40 PM on February 23, 2009


Laud.
posted by alms at 5:42 PM on February 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


Wait, do you want a now or a verb?
posted by alms at 5:43 PM on February 23, 2009


Are we talking about a verb or a noun?
posted by yersinia at 5:43 PM on February 23, 2009


Accolade? Ovation? Tribute?
posted by valkyryn at 5:43 PM on February 23, 2009


Extol? Exalt?
posted by kickingtheground at 5:46 PM on February 23, 2009


Well, here's the thing:

given

after writing several phrases in the style of a particular author saying "(this is going to start sounding like a XXXX to Mr So-and-So soon)"

'homage' is precisely the correct word.

From Wikipedia:

Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom one feels indebted. In this sense, a reference within a creative work to someone who greatly influenced the artist would be an homage. It is typically used to denote a reference in a work of art or literature to another, at least somewhat widely known, work. In literature and film, an homage is similar to an allusion, except that whereas an allusion merely refers to another work, a homage typically repeats a recognizable scene or stylistic element from the other work...


Is there some aspect of the imitation foregrounded by the synonym you have in mind that would make it more apt?
posted by snuffleupagus at 5:51 PM on February 23, 2009


eulogize?
posted by neroli at 6:03 PM on February 23, 2009


elegy?
posted by avocet at 6:09 PM on February 23, 2009


I can offer "encomium," but really you want "laud" or "homage," depending on the part of speech.
posted by eritain at 6:09 PM on February 23, 2009


Crud, I can't even offer "encomium." How did I miss that?
posted by eritain at 6:11 PM on February 23, 2009


"A pastiche of Mr. X" is OK if you don't mind implying that your work is a little derivative.
posted by eritain at 6:12 PM on February 23, 2009


Exult.
posted by Muirwylde at 6:16 PM on February 23, 2009


Exultation.
posted by Muirwylde at 6:17 PM on February 23, 2009


Missed the imitation aspect the first time around-- yeah, "homage" is sounding pretty close to what you're going for.
posted by yersinia at 6:24 PM on February 23, 2009


I'd go with laud.
posted by yellowbinder at 6:25 PM on February 23, 2009


To veer monotheistic:
hosanna
hagiography
posted by fleacircus at 6:26 PM on February 23, 2009


It's definitely "homage", if you like and are paying respects to the author whose style you're imitating.

Not all instances of you writing in someone else's style are homages. If you're making fun of them it's a parody, lampoon, etc.

But if you're writing in someone's style and your intent, or the accidental effect, is a demonstration of how much you respect or admire them, the noun is "homage".
posted by AmbroseChapel at 6:30 PM on February 23, 2009


Exaltation, panegyric, homage, song of praise, or tribute would all work in your sentence. Homage is the best, I think, if you mean "I realize that I'm starting to sound like I'm writing in the style of this person". Elegy isn't quite right unless the person you're praising is dead.
posted by pseudostrabismus at 6:38 PM on February 23, 2009


The asker implies in the title that homage is not the right word.
posted by Pants! at 7:03 PM on February 23, 2009


Mimesis, perhaps.
posted by Robin Kestrel at 7:47 PM on February 23, 2009


If you want a verb, laud or exult.
posted by sourwookie at 12:31 AM on February 24, 2009


I was going to say laud, but also, lionize.
posted by themadjuggler at 4:07 AM on February 24, 2009


Allusion? Allude?
posted by min at 12:56 PM on February 24, 2009


The asker implies in the title that homage is not the right word.

Yes, but it's not clear why it isn't the right word. It would be a great help if the poster would return and explain why it's not. The first suggestion in the thread, encomium, is the best alternative I've seen, but it doesn't capture the "in the style of" aspect.
posted by languagehat at 1:12 PM on February 24, 2009


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