How to push a resume through Yahoo HR?
April 14, 2008 10:32 PM   Subscribe

How to push a resume through Yahoo HR?

I am absolutly dying to work for Yahoo! and cannot seem to bypass the career website. Do I need to add keywords to my resume? Thoughts?
posted by bitsy to Work & Money (11 answers total)
 
A possibly applicable answer from an old job question. If you can get anyone there to talk to you (and it shouldn't be impossible to contact someone that works at Yahoo), it sounds like it could work.
posted by ignignokt at 10:47 PM on April 14, 2008


Use LinkedIn or something similar to try to connect with a recruiter there. Recruiters basically get paid to push people through the hiring process. Although given Yahoo's current status as an acquisition target I would not be surprised if they suspended most hiring at least temporarily.
posted by GuyZero at 11:02 PM on April 14, 2008


Recruiters basically get paid to push people through the hiring process.

Back when I had a career as a consultant I thought of HR as having exactly the opposite job. They are there to winnow out candidates. No one ever remembers the HR person who found a great employee but they do remember the idiot in HR who let a dud slip past. However, it's entirely possible that I'm completely wrong.
posted by rdr at 1:05 AM on April 15, 2008


With a company like Yahoo (or Google, or Microsoft, or...) unless you have something on your resume like graduated top of class at MIT, or won the Nobel Prize for Physics, it's basically a crapshoot. Recruiters at those places usually go through tens of thousands of resumes (basically by key word search on the in house application). Your best bet is to try to network in somehow and ask your contact to submit your resume to the hiring manager or to HR. Otherwise, you're playing a numbers game.
posted by psmealey at 2:46 AM on April 15, 2008


Use LinkedIn as noted above, but not to find recruiters. Find managers in the department that you want to work for. By the time HR knows about a job opening the hiring manager already has a short list of people for the job. You want to be on that short list before HR ever hears your name.

Also as noted above, given what is going on at Yahoo, I wouldn't gt my hopes up in the near term. I probably wouldn't even try. Even you do get on board things could change dramatically fairly quickly when or if they are finally bought out. You might hate the post buyout Yahoo, or you might find yourself unemployed in the post buyout consolidation.
posted by COD at 5:18 AM on April 15, 2008


Depending on your timeline & location restrictions you may be able to network your way in the traditional way. Attend conferences, workshops, & get togethers that people you want to work with will be likely to attend. Not only will you be able to meet potential "in's," but you can also find out more about the job, and be able to add those events to your resume
posted by cuando at 9:07 AM on April 15, 2008


No one ever remembers the HR person who found a great employee but they do remember the idiot in HR who let a dud slip past.

I have been working 2 weeks at a certain large search engine company in Mountain View, so the hiring process is fresh in my mind.

1 - I never applied for this job. Amazing but true. I got called by an internal recruiter.

2 - the recruiter is paid to place people. Just like an external headhunter. I get hired, he/she gets paid.

3 - line and executive management is in the job of not hiring people. So my manager, my director, my VP, heck apparently even the founders of the company all had to approve my resume and my interview results in order for me to get hired. They will winnow out the bad hires.

So there's this tension - one person wants you in, a lot of people are apathetic and want only the most qualified people. I would not bother contact managers as they are, for the most part, super-busy and do not have the time to deal with random people. Recruiters, on the other hand, will look at a qualified resume as another potential commission and will do their best to move you through the process. They are, however, ultimately powerless and cannot move an unqualified candidate anywhere.

The resume page and hiring aliases are utterly useless for all companies IMO. I have never gotten a job from them. I have had success emailing managers in small companies and dealing with recruiters for large companies. But it's a numbers game - there are some companies that you will simply have no success with. it's frustrating but there are always more fish in the sea.
posted by GuyZero at 9:37 AM on April 15, 2008


Oh, also - an internal referral works much better than a cold external call. So you don't have to find a manager. Find ANYONE at Yahoo who is willing to vouch for you and follow up with HR to get you an interview. Followup is key - which is why managers are not a good choice as they're always really busy. After that it's all about you.
posted by GuyZero at 9:38 AM on April 15, 2008


here you go.

If you're a software engineer, they will probably be more enthusiastic.


Guyzero has a few things right (recruiters will act in your best interest, talk to them) and a few things wrong (hiring aliases aren't useless -- use them, internal recruiters aren't usually on commission), but whatever you've heard, hiring hasn't stopped in silicon valley, so go for it.

And don't forget to spellcheck.
posted by sixacross at 12:15 PM on April 15, 2008


Well, fair enough - they may not be on commission but their job objectives are to get people hired. If they get a bonus it will be based on getting people placed. The right people, of course, but the recruiters don't have the final say in who is right vs wrong.

I stand by hiring aliases being non-useful (useless seems to harsh but it is perhaps true). I have had recruiters amaze hiring managers with the exact same resume that was sent to a hiring alias and went completely ignored there. Perhaps I lack the right resume keywords.
posted by GuyZero at 1:03 PM on April 15, 2008


I have had recruiters amaze hiring managers with the exact same resume that was sent to a hiring alias and went completely ignored there. Perhaps I lack the right resume keywords.

The difference is in the process. When your resume gets transmitted through a recruiter, the hiring manager or internal HR rep assumes that the candidate has been pre-screened or qualified (after all, why pay the recruiter 15-25% otherwise?), so those resumes get more attention. HR reps do look at stuff that comes in through the recruiting alias, but unfortunately the good candidates that submit that way are typically drowned up by the enormity of people applying for a job, just any job regardless of whether they are qualified.

Having said that, most companies do monitor their jobs@company.com mailboxes if they are looking to save a buck here or there on recruiting fees, or if they just don't get what they need from the recruiters.

Regardless, yes, an internal referral in the hand is worth a hundred or two emails in the recruiting mailbox. And it doesn't have to be from a senior exec. If you can find anyone to vouch for you inside the company, you have at least a pretty good shot at getting an interview.
posted by psmealey at 11:08 AM on April 16, 2008


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