The Wingdings font is fun and all, but is there a productive use for it?
November 16, 2006 8:10 AM   Subscribe

The Wingdings font is fun and all, but is there a productive use for it?
posted by jeff_w_welch to Computers & Internet (19 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
Sure, if you want to make something look more, err "fun" in a cheesy kind of way.
  • You could use the pencil, or a pointed finger or one of the many arrows as bullet points.
  • It also has the Apple "command" and "delete" keys, as well as a Windows logo which you could use if you need to write down certain keystrokes for a guide or user manual.
  • I'm sure the various religious symbols can also be used for something.

posted by DrSkrud at 8:16 AM on November 16, 2006


My understand is that, like other 'dingbat' fonts, it's used for symbols. I find Webdings more useful, but sometimes (in more graphic design-y stuff) I'll find that I'm looking for a more unique bullet point or the like, or a sort of icon, and Wingdings (et al) are useful for that.
posted by fogster at 8:17 AM on November 16, 2006


I've used it for substitute bullets as well. Just one of those 'catch-all' collections of potentially useful stuff.
posted by cowbellemoo at 8:19 AM on November 16, 2006


In the ancient times of the early 90's, I created an order management system in Filemaker Pro (pre version 3.0) for a small computer company. I needed some graphic icons to represent stages in order completion and by using Winddings & Dingbats I could use the little pictograms to represent some fairly complex order information at a glance. That version of the program didn't allow for any dynamic graphics aside from text so it worked like a charm.
posted by ernie at 8:20 AM on November 16, 2006


Also in the ancient times of the early 90's, our family computer was in the family room. I used wingdings to type coded notes to my friends or journal entries - so my younger sister and parents couldn't come up behind me and read what I was writing. When no one was looking I would then quickly switch the font to something readable, print it, and stow the document somewhere safe.
posted by youngergirl44 at 8:30 AM on November 16, 2006


That's awesome, I wondered if anybody used it for encryption.
posted by jeff_w_welch at 8:40 AM on November 16, 2006


That's what I always thought they were for: rudimentary coded notes.
posted by Merlyn at 8:41 AM on November 16, 2006


I've typically increased the size of the dingbat fonts so that they're large enough to be used as quick and easy clipart. It's also great because after rasterization, everything that's not part of the outline is already transparent.
posted by pinksoftsoap at 8:47 AM on November 16, 2006


That's awesome, I wondered if anybody used it for encryption.
posted by jeff_w_welch at 10:40 AM CST on November 16


That's what I always thought they were for: rudimentary coded notes.
posted by Merlyn at 10:41 AM CST on November 16


At one of my first jobs, a coworker and I used a meant-to-broken Wingdings "encryption" to mess with someone in our department who was chewing up server space (hey, it was the 90s, storage was more limited) with spreadsheets cataloging her Disney videos.
posted by COBRA! at 8:56 AM on November 16, 2006


the wingdings code?
posted by jepler at 9:17 AM on November 16, 2006


As a law student I use Wingdings to help me clean up my class notes and make them more visually interesting. They make for more "fun" bullets and other visual cues. This is helpful during exams when I can think of all the information for a certain subsection of a class as one "group" with a visual representation.

I have seen law firms and other business using this type of font in this way.
posted by irisell at 9:18 AM on November 16, 2006


Suppose you wanted a picture of the window-close button or a radio button. They're in Wingdings (and not in Webdings).
posted by Kirth Gerson at 9:19 AM on November 16, 2006


Wingdings fonts tend to be the best clip art you don't have to buy. In my experience, it's hard to find nice vector clip art, but look at some of this. In a poke, dingbat fonts are a lifesaver for illustrations. When I designed my wedding invitations, I bought these lovelies. Now, Wingdings itself is useful in these applications only for the most rudimentary stuff -- a circle with a 1/4 pie piece shaded in, for instance -- but it's a valuable medium.
posted by blueshammer at 9:28 AM on November 16, 2006


I used to put together really snazzy fliers using text mixed with real large wingding and winding type fonts. I found most clip art too distracting and not as interesting as what I could sit down and draw myself, but when I wanted to add an air of "this was made by a computer" I would incorporate in some of them.
posted by redsparkler at 10:18 AM on November 16, 2006


As a programmer, I've used Wingdings in a few applications to place checkmarks and empty boxes and whatnot in a few places.

It works in a pinch.
posted by unixrat at 11:04 AM on November 16, 2006


There were a few kids in my middle school many years ago who taught themselves to read wingdings, for note-passing purposes.
posted by vytae at 11:18 AM on November 16, 2006


Why, just this morning, I used the webding 'eyeball' to indicate that certain items in a table had a corresponding image. Usefull!
posted by Kololo at 12:46 PM on November 16, 2006


Graphic artists and production artists use the "ding" fonts all the time to fit check boxes and other specialized symbols into text areas. Scissors for the "cut along dotted line" score mark, flourishes along borders. If you look for it you'll see it everywhere in printed materials.
posted by lekvar at 2:20 PM on November 16, 2006


I think people use them to mark the ends of articles.
posted by concrete at 7:08 PM on November 16, 2006


« Older Self-hosting YouSendIt   |   Pet-to-People Ratios? Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.