How do I prove I don’t work? (UK edition)
September 13, 2021 7:42 AM   Subscribe

I recently came across a university offering online classes for rare languages. To qualify for a tuition fee exemption, I need to send them proof that I don’t work. I don’t work; I’m a grad student (part time). The university is in France and I live in the UK. I’m not sure how to go about this.
posted by bigyellowtaxi to Work & Money (7 answers total)
 
I would imagine that, especially for France, they would have a list of appropriate documents. In the USA it would usually be something like submitting the previous year’s taxes
posted by raccoon409 at 8:06 AM on September 13


If there's no list on their website (perhaps this is a standard thing to prove in France, and if you lived there you would of course have a [document] proving your status, so they don't need to clarify!), can you ask the university what forms of proof they'll accept?
posted by ManyLeggedCreature at 8:23 AM on September 13


Maybe documents or statements showing you receive benefits like Jobseeker’s Allowance or housing benefit? I realize things have changed since I lived in the UK and they now have a different system but basically when I helped people with housing benefit applications and they had to show they didn’t work they did that through showing they got job seekers benefit… the idea was that you must get money from somewhere, so if it’s not a job then where is it from…so grants? Loans? Bank statements?
posted by pairofshades at 8:30 AM on September 13


Response by poster: Just an update. I heard back from them and this is what they want: “It can be a tax assessment notice, or a proof of registration with a national employment agency, or anything else that would show us that you have no regular income”.

I have a UK NI (national insurance) number but I have never worked - I’ve only ever been in education (full and part time). I’m funded by my family/a part scholarship.

And I have never done a tax assessment - so not sure what exactly to submit. I thought about submitting bank statements but people can have multiple bank accounts - so that doesn’t feel like evidence.

PS: I don’t particularly want to register with the local job centre here because I’m not looking for a job.
posted by bigyellowtaxi at 8:34 AM on September 13


You can check your National Insurance record, which will show that you've made no contributions (I think it'll also show that contributions have been made on your behalf for at least some of your years of full-time education). Hopefully there will be something you can download there that might help.
posted by ManyLeggedCreature at 8:39 AM on September 13


The "tax assessment notice" could be a translation of the Avis d'imposition, which is the official document sent by the tax office in France. It includes all your sources of income. Possibly there's something similar in the UK.
posted by elgilito at 8:43 AM on September 13 [2 favorites]


The "tax assessment notice" could be a translation of the Avis d'imposition, which is the official document sent by the tax office in France. It includes all your sources of income. Possibly there's something similar in the UK.

Yes, HMRC produces an Annual Tax Summary for most individuals. I'm not sure if they are produced for people who've never paid any income tax or National Insurance contributions, but it's certainly worth logging in to find out.
posted by Klipspringer at 11:17 AM on September 13


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