rice but make it flavor
August 10, 2021 12:58 PM   Subscribe

What's your fave online source for furikake?

That's it!

You have a source for the tastiest of rice seasoning, I want to know it. Prefer to get it from a place rather than Amazon.

I'll eat pretty much anything.
posted by phunniemee to Food & Drink (10 answers total) 13 users marked this as a favorite
 
I'm not answering your question, and you probably already know it, but in case not, the H-mart in your city has a dozen pretty good options. (I'm a bit embarrassed to be very fond of the Doraemon branded one.)
posted by eotvos at 1:19 PM on August 10, 2021 [3 favorites]


Response by poster: I've definitely bought furikake at H Mart before but you see I don't like leaving my house so
posted by phunniemee at 1:55 PM on August 10, 2021 [2 favorites]


Also not an online answer, but if you live somewhere with Trader Joe's, they now carry their own brand and it's pretty good.
posted by BlahLaLa at 1:57 PM on August 10, 2021 [1 favorite]


It’s not furikake, but instead the Korean version - Sung Gyung kimjaban. Gochujar has a bunch of other things that are good to mix into rice, like oils and various fermented pastes, too, but that’s the closest they get to furikake.
posted by Mizu at 2:08 PM on August 10, 2021 [1 favorite]


Best answer: Me mail me!
posted by tipsyBumblebee at 2:53 PM on August 10, 2021


Best answer: I really like the kind that comes in the envelopes instead of the jars. I haven't bought from the linked store, but the two shown are my favorite flavors.
posted by Space Kitty at 3:42 PM on August 10, 2021


Best answer: Ocean's Balance furikake is made with Maine seaweed and comes in bonito, shiitake and spicy blends. Spicy's my favorite. And they farm their own kelp!
posted by Text TK at 4:32 PM on August 10, 2021 [2 favorites]


Depending on how much Japanese food you eat, you might already have the ingredients at home...Are you up for a minimal amount of cooking (like just placing things in a pot and simmering)? I'm a super-lazy cook but recently started putting together a simple homemade one from the leftover bits of a mentsuyu recipe as suggested by Just One Cookbook. This way, I get to be picky about stuff like the quality of bonito flakes or salt/sugar content.

Now that I think about it, my family used to do a no-cook version of this just by drizzling soy sauce onto good katsuobushi and adding sesame seeds or other spices if needed. It won't be the dry kind that comes in packets but it's a common filling for onigiri as well.

(The most addictive furikake I've had was a salmon one but I'll have to dig around to remember the name, or to see if the company's still around...)
posted by Sockin'inthefreeworld at 4:34 PM on August 10, 2021 [1 favorite]


Best answer: More spendy but Oaktown Spice Shop (Oakland) has delightful furikake.
posted by rogerroger at 8:07 PM on August 10, 2021


I've definitely bought furikake at H Mart before but you see I don't like leaving my house so

At least my local H-Mart has replaced their entire furikake selection with only Ajishima brand—and I personally won’t buy made-in-China ingredients—so I appreciate this question!
posted by musicinmybrain at 3:08 PM on August 12, 2021


« Older Can a mild Covid breakthrough case lead to...   |   Best U.S. City 2041 Newer »

You are not logged in, either login or create an account to post comments