Translate this odd Australian retail food quantity
June 10, 2021 8:12 AM   Subscribe

A friend is trying to convert an Australian recipe that calls for a "net" of strawberries. What would be the equivalent quantity in any standard metric or imperial unit of weight or volume?
posted by jon1270 to Food & Drink (9 answers total)
 
Has the recipe been copied and pasted or something? It 'net' supposed to be 'punnet', in other words?
posted by pipeski at 8:16 AM on June 10 [4 favorites]


It's not one I've heard of - could it be a truncated Punnet?
posted by zamboni at 8:16 AM on June 10 [1 favorite]


Could that mean a punnet, that is the small container they come in at a grocery store? I think that'd be about a pint.
posted by Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug at 8:17 AM on June 10 [1 favorite]


Response by poster: could it be a truncated Punnet?

I do not know, but that certainly seems plausible.
posted by jon1270 at 8:19 AM on June 10


Best answer: Came in to say punnet as well after consultation with an Australian cook.
posted by nathaole at 8:20 AM on June 10


Mod note: Sorry, made a minor post edit to remove a "more inside" play on words, carry on.
posted by LobsterMitten (staff) at 8:22 AM on June 10 [1 favorite]


Response by poster: Sorry about that, LM.
posted by jon1270 at 8:23 AM on June 10


Best answer: Woolworths (Australian grocer, no relation) sells ‘em in 250g boxes.
posted by Phanx at 8:31 AM on June 10 [2 favorites]


...which everybody calls "punnets". As an Australian I've never heard of a "net" of strawberries.

250g is about one strawberry more than half a pound.
posted by flabdablet at 8:32 AM on June 10 [1 favorite]


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