Dinner inspo
May 5, 2021 10:30 AM   Subscribe

Link me to the most delicious recipe you’ve made recently! Anything goes. Think “delicious”—not necessarily “easy” or “fast” or whatever (although those qualities are welcome too).
posted by HotToddy to Food & Drink (54 answers total) 96 users marked this as a favorite
 
Serious Eats' Pork Carnitas is an amazing recipe. I'd pair it with their esquites recipe, which was even better than I was expecting.
posted by hydra77 at 10:32 AM on May 5 [7 favorites]


Hardly easy or fast. But worth it. Artichoke pie.
posted by Splunge at 10:39 AM on May 5


I don't have a recipe list but this is very simple. we have this regularly (last night) and its always delicious.

pasta (we use whole wheat) shorter chunkier ones like penne probably work better
about equal amount of zucchini in chunks sautéed.

cook up some hot italian sausage and chop in chunks. toss all pasta, zuchs and sausage in a tomato sauce and add some pecorino to taste. its so good and super easy.
posted by supermedusa at 10:42 AM on May 5 [1 favorite]


I have never made a recipe from Smitten Kitchen that was a flop, but lately I've been making this pasta with garlicky broccoli rabe. It is gobbled up by both my adventurous eater and my very, very picky eater. We also make these farro bowls with roasted veggies a lot (the veg is easily adjusted for whatever you have on hand) and tonight we're making these salsa verde enchiladas. I also make a version of greens and beans that involves cooking aromatics, dumping in a can or two of white beans, adding vegetable stock and then a whole lot of kale or swiss chard, and then serving with a poached egg and some fresh sourdough (no recipe, it's just dumping stuff in a dutch oven).
posted by SeedStitch at 10:42 AM on May 5 [1 favorite]


Link
These are fairly easy, somewhat fast, and very delicious.
posted by missriss89 at 10:43 AM on May 5 [1 favorite]


Smitten Kitchen's Roast Chicken with Schmaltzy Cabbage. Simple as can be and *transcendently* delicious.

I'm also obsessed with this Bon Appetit recipe for cauliflower Bolognese.
posted by urbanlenny at 10:45 AM on May 5 [7 favorites]


damn, I forgot to add we always augment our red sauce with some Calabrian pepper sauce for a little zing and depth.
posted by supermedusa at 10:46 AM on May 5


I made this moussaka for the second time on Monday, and it was worth the effort even after working a full day and making so many pots dirty.

(My opinion may be biased based on the fact that I just finished a piece warmed up for lunch and it may be even better as a leftover. I want another piece so badly.)
posted by MCMikeNamara at 10:49 AM on May 5


Baigan Achari - eggplant in the pickling style. It is one of the most delicious things I've ever made. There are other recipes online which don't use the kolonji seed, but I doubt they'd turn out as well as this one.
posted by essexjan at 10:54 AM on May 5 [2 favorites]


Pretty easy. Though I ended up using this recipe for the dumplings themselves.
posted by troywestfield at 10:56 AM on May 5


Dal makhani
posted by mezzanayne at 11:12 AM on May 5 [1 favorite]


This beef and lamb tagine was quite good. I made it with fake ground meat and everyone liked it, although my wife said it was a bit sweet because of the dates (ignoring the fact that I made it because I wanted to use up some of the dates we have).
posted by any portmanteau in a storm at 11:20 AM on May 5 [1 favorite]


Tik Tok Pasta (basically a feta pasta) Is fast (Ish), tastes like it's from a restaurant, and feels fancy! Just tried it last week and it was great. I recommend cooking the tomatos a bit longer than you'd think.
posted by bbqturtle at 11:20 AM on May 5 [3 favorites]


Serious Eats’ gyudon and fish-fragrant eggplant
posted by moonmilk at 11:21 AM on May 5 [3 favorites]


I made a kind of bastardized tofu bahn mi based on a few different recipes and it was so good I could eat it every day. It's a little fussy getting all the ingredients ready, but once you have them all made, making sandwiches from the leftovers the next day is super easy. I made pickled carrots and daikon radish (I think I scaled down this recipe and added in some cucumber slices). I mixed up some mayo with sriracha and lime juice. I drained, pressed, and sliced tofu into little slabs, then marinated it in soy sauce, maple syrup, and a little sesame oil. I baked the tofu at 400 on a foil-lined baking sheet sprayed with a little oil until the edges were brown. In the last 5-10 minutes of cooking, I wrapped a 6-inch piece of grocery store baguette in tin foil and put it in the oven to heat up (I strongly believe that good bahn mi needs mediocre bread--no artisanal crusty business). After assembling the sandwich fillings, I added fresh cilantro to finish.

Oh, also: the Serious Eats Halal Cart-style Chicken is excellent and a similar amount of work.
posted by theotherdurassister at 11:26 AM on May 5 [6 favorites]


Carrot Orzotto is a probably the most distinctive recipe we have--nothing else we make is like it and it's so good. (Increase the feta to your taste--our taste is almost always for more cheese than called for.)
posted by dlugoczaj at 11:29 AM on May 5 [4 favorites]


I've made Budget Bytes Balsamic Chicken and Mushrooms several times in the past few weeks - I can't get enough!
posted by lyssabee at 11:36 AM on May 5 [4 favorites]


Vada Pav All the way!!!! No recipe I can find tells you what potatoes to use; best results in my end have been a 50/50 split between yellow and russets. You’d an also add peas to the potatoes while forming the balls, and this is extra delicious.

This has firmly supplanted my desire for a good burger. You can often purchase pre packaged chutneys at a local Indian market if you have one; they’re really the time-sucks on this recipe.
posted by furnace.heart at 11:43 AM on May 5




Murgh Makhani (butter chicken) from America's Test Kitchen. A friend turned me on to it and it is SO GOOD. (the link requires an email to register but you get awesome recipes in return but I'm happy to give the recipe to anyone who MeMails me).
posted by cooker girl at 11:53 AM on May 5 [2 favorites]


Palak Paneer from Sanjana Feasts - so delicious! Requires a pressure cooker. I made my own paneer (pretty simple, very tasty), but you could use store bought if it's available where you are.
posted by carrioncomfort at 11:59 AM on May 5 [1 favorite]


I love Smitten Kitchen also... I made this recipe for yogurt flatbreads to go with this one for baked feta with tomatoes and chickpeas, but I subbed chevre for the feta.

I also made this recipe they're calling chicken tikka masala, but that name doesn't feel accurate. It's more of a chicken curry. I'm still on the hunt for a legit chicken tikka masala recipe. The recipe is involved -- I split up parts into two days -- but tasty. (I left out a few green chilis so the heat didn't blow me away.) I've even just made the chicken part before and tossed into fried rice meals that come together with whatever I have on hand.

I've also made these chili lime tacos, but mostly, just make the salmon part and have it with other sides. Cooks up fast and is delicious.

And finally, there's this lemon turmeric tea cake that is such a joy to eat. It's been a hit with everyone I've shared it with.
posted by pdxhiker at 12:01 PM on May 5 [4 favorites]


We made Maqluba (Upside-Down Chicken and Rice) and it was delicious -- and not hard to make.
posted by Lescha at 12:05 PM on May 5 [1 favorite]


Nudged over the years from a cook’s illustrated overly complex recipe for a nice take on pasta primavera into our own thing we do when asparagus is in season here.

Asparagus, leeks, garlic, carrot, celery, peas, chives, mint, lemon, parmesan, white wine, dried cut pasta (usually campanelle, sometimes rotini) olive oil, salt and pepper of course.

There are two keys to this being really awesome instead of mediocre. One is you have to actually make vegetable broth from scratch, from your trimmings. The other is how you cook the pasta, which is done in a sort of risotto style.

Trim the asparagus and leeks. Keep the woody bottoms and dark green parts, wash thoroughly. Cut and wash the rest into bite sized pieces. Roughly chop carrot and celery, smash a couple cloves of garlic, mince a handful more of garlic. Set frozen peas aside to thaw on the counter if you want. Pluck mint leaves from stems and mince, wash stems thoroughly as well. While you’re using the cutting board, mince chives and mix with mint. Zest entire lemon and mix with herbs, set aside. Juice entire lemon.

Make stock. Take asparagus and leek trimmings, mint stems, smashed garlic, carrot and celery, and cover with water. Salt liberally and bring to a boil, cover. Simmer for about twenty minutes or until all the flavor is extracted from the vegetables and they themselves taste bland. Strain and put it back in the pot to keep warm on the stove.

Cook the vegetables in a large pan, which you will also cook the pasta in later. Olive oil, salt and pepper, leeks first. Cook on medium high heat to get a little color, then turn down to cook them through. Add asparagus and minced garlic, cook until a few minutes underdone (it will get finished in the pasta later.) You may wish to add a splash of white wine and cover, letting things steam for a minute. Scoop out everything and set it aside, wipe out the pan if you need to.

In that same pan heat a lot of olive oil. Then toast the dried pasta. Add salt. Use enough pasta to coat the pan in one layer. You want to see white spots develop on the pasta. You might even get some browning, be careful not to let it burn but that’s good flavor. Keep it mixing so you don’t get burnt spots and develop toastiness all over. Then add a good amount of white wine, and let the pasta absorb it. Add a couple ladles of the vegetable stock, repeat. Each time you want to wait for the pasta to almost fully absorb the liquid before switching to either the stock or wine and repeating. Stir often. If you are low on either, you can occasionally cover the pasta and let the steam be absorbed, but more flavor is developed if you do it uncovered. When the pasta is a few minutes from al dente, there will be a starchy sauce beginning to develop in the pan.

Put the vegetables back into the pasta and combine. Also add the frozen peas. Finish the dish with the lemon juice, and let it cook out for a bit. Add plenty of fresh pepper. Turn off the heat. Add the mint, chives, and lemon zest, and thoroughly mix into the still-hot pan. When it has cooled a bit add parmesan, which will make any remaining liquid in the pan into a slightly creamy sauce. You may wish to add some butter, that’s good too, or some nice extra virgin olive oil (use cheaper stuff to toast the pasta). Taste for salt. Consume, and be amazed at how much more it is than the sum of its parts.
posted by Mizu at 12:07 PM on May 5 [10 favorites]


The tiktok feta pasta is pretty great. Make sure to use a chunk of imported - like Greek or Israeli - feta, not US. Costco and Trader Joe's both have good feta choices. Add more pasta cooking water than you think at the end until the sauce is creamy. Cook the pasta in the sauce until it is completely ready to eat (as al dente or not as you like).
posted by RoadScholar at 12:11 PM on May 5


I loved Birds-eye Bavarian Green Beans with Spaetzle and Sauce, but they don't produce it any more, so I learned to make spaetzle. The skinny frozen green beans(harocits verts) from Trader Joes are perfect for this. I moosh the spaetzle batter through a grater, messy but doable. The sauce is non-dairy butter and chopped bacon.

Dinner tonight is buffalo roasted cauliflower, just olive oil, hot sauce, cauliflower, hot oven. I'm sure there are a lot of ways to enjoy cauliflower, but whenever I have some, this is how I want to cook it.
posted by theora55 at 12:17 PM on May 5 [1 favorite]


also, excellent ask.me, tyvm.
posted by theora55 at 12:19 PM on May 5 [3 favorites]


Bún Thịt Nướng (Vietnamese Grilled Pork & Rice Noodles). Marinating the pork overnight makes it very flavorful. We made our own eggrolls as well.
posted by automatic cabinet at 12:26 PM on May 5


Yolam Ottolenghi's 15 minute miso, tomato, oregano and maple syrup spaghetti. I added slivers of sausage in the crispy-bits stage. Absolutely delicious.
posted by I claim sanctuary at 12:30 PM on May 5 [2 favorites]


Hellofresh has had their Creamy Dill Chicken on the menu a couple of times in recent weeks, and honestly, that dish alone justifies my subscription. Here's the recipe, although you might need a Hellofresh login. If you can't see it, it's just sauteed chicken with a pan sauce of chicken broth (technically, stock concentrate and water), reduced for a few minutes and then with sour cream, dijon mustard, and fresh dill added. They usually do it with a veggie and a potato side - this week's (which just happen to be my favorites for sauteed chicken in general) were roasted green beans and roasted potatoes. The linked recipe doesn't include this, but squirt some lemon juice on your green beans.
posted by kevinbelt at 12:41 PM on May 5 [3 favorites]


I went through a big slow-cooker phase this winter - I was working from home and trying to do things easy as I battled the worst part of recovering from a broken knee - and this recipe involving butternut squash, frozen tortellini, and cream cheese made my roommate announce that it was so good that he was going to look it up and add it to HIS regular rotation (he subsists largely on canned chili, box pasta and Korean takeout, with my occasional sharing of leftovers, so him deciding he was going to cook something is BIG).
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 1:19 PM on May 5


Kimchi Jjigae
posted by thebots at 1:34 PM on May 5 [1 favorite]


Response by poster: To those recommending Tik Tok feta pasta—I made that the night before last and it’s what inspired this question!
posted by HotToddy at 1:52 PM on May 5 [2 favorites]


Oooh! I just remembered one other thing that was so delicious I couldn't do anything while eating it--no scrolling, no talking, just snarfing it down. Half a head of cauliflower chopped into chunks and a small onion sliced root to stem, tossed with neutral oil, spread in a single layer onto a baking sheet, and sprinkled with salt, roasted at 425 until caramelized (20-30 minutes, check occasionally). A dip made from mayo (1/2 cup?), lemon juice (start with half a lemon's worth), and curry powder (start with 1 tsp), adjusted to taste.
posted by theotherdurassister at 2:00 PM on May 5 [4 favorites]


My murgh makhani recipe (which comes the closest to my favorite restaurant's) is pretty close to the ATK recipe linked above, but whichever one you use I cannot highly enough recommend finishing with the kasoori methi/dried fenugreek leaves. This was the mystery ingredient in my favorite restaurant's version that I could not figure out, and it just levels the whole thing up.

Sometimes I make creamed spinach plus a pound of sliced sauteed or roasted mushrooms added in, as a pasta sauce. For some reason this is especially good with roasted salmon.
posted by Lyn Never at 3:01 PM on May 5 [2 favorites]


The other day I saw a recipe for baked chicken breast meat with feta and chopped black olives/pepperoncinis/tomato/onion. Also possibly “Greek seasoning”. That’s a winning combo no matter what.

So I faked it and, honestly, it tasted fantastic even though I made it on the stovetop with a can of Costco chicken breast, dried onion and dried tomatoes, and used dried parsley, garlic and dill in lieu of “Greek seasoning”. Not haute cuisine by any stretch but definitely way better than any meal of pantry and fridge staples has a right to be.
posted by Sublimity at 3:13 PM on May 5 [1 favorite]


This green mole chicken is easily one of the tastiest things I make, and it's hard to believe that the chicken is boiled. You wind up with a quart and a half of seasoned stock leftover, and that makes a tasty base for something like tortilla soup.
posted by mollweide at 3:31 PM on May 5 [1 favorite]


This tomato basil soup is excellent. Quick and easy to boot
posted by kathrynm at 3:56 PM on May 5


I made this tart for dinner last week, but I used phyllo dough instead of puff pastry and it was incredible. I also added a little feta sprinkled over the top. It heated up great for breakfast the next morning, too.
posted by pazazygeek at 4:14 PM on May 5


Justin Severino's Rigatoni with Italian Sausage and Rapini Red Sauce recipe in the WSJ (of all places) is the one my family asks for by name. It's amazing, so simple, and my go-to favorite for dinner parties because it's entertaining-friendly.

I modify it to double the amount of sausage from a half pound to a full pound. Regular old grocery store brand sausage that comes in a flat pack is perfect. I like to set it up ahead and let the sauce sauté for a few hours. This means I can get out of the kitchen and enjoy cocktails with guests, and then when it's getting around time to eat, I start the pasta cooking and add the rabe/broccolini to the sauce and in about 10-15 minutes it's all ready.
posted by woot at 5:53 PM on May 5 [1 favorite]


Delicious is my favorite category of food, and I only rarely eat others, if in some way delicious is unavailable.
Fish Fragrant Eggplant was mentioned above by moonmilk.
I don't eat much meat, but when I do, Mark Bittman's simple roast chicken is often on the menu. I put a lemon inside the chicken and then later I make a gravy from the juices and some cream. New potatoes and a green salad. Spring. Heaven. Make sure the chicken is ethically and sustainably raised, it will be the best for your feelings and your culinary experience.
I have many, many more. But I need to sleep now...
posted by mumimor at 6:24 PM on May 5 [1 favorite]


I made a seafood stew last night (cobbled together from a few different recipes) which was amazing and really easy. It’s flexible with whatever seafood you have, so go nuts.

You’ll need a largish cooking pot or Dutch oven. First, fry off one chopped onion, a couple sticks of chopped celery and 3 cloves of garlic for a few minutes until they’re soft. Then add in two cans of diced tomatoes - I like the ones with herbs in it - and half a glass of white wine. Simmer all this for 20 minutes. Then put in about a kilo of firm white fish that you’ve cut into chunks and simmer this for about five minutes. Finally, if you have mussels, mix in about a dozen of them and a handful of prawns (or whatever quick cooking seafood you like) for a few minutes and you’re done. Throw in some parsley or extra herbs if you have it (but I didn’t).

I served it with garlic bread. It was fantastic, served four people with enough for leftovers. It does not have to be an expensive meal at all, and would go really well with any basic marinara mix you can get from a fishmonger.
posted by Jubey at 8:28 PM on May 5


Most popular things I've made recently: Cheesy Cauliflower and Potato Soup, Creamy Mexican Corn Chowder.
posted by TayBridge at 8:46 PM on May 5


Greek peas, which has become a go-to for easy deliciousness. I simmer it longer than the linked recipe specifies, up to an hour and twenty minutes.

Much thanks to taz for posting it in this AskMe, which is where I learned about it.
posted by under_petticoat_rule at 8:51 PM on May 5


Rick Bayless' Pozole recipe.
Stanley Tucci's gnocchi recipe, with blanched green beans and 1/2 C of pesto. I found Babish's recipe after kinda winging it. I recommend roasting the potatoes instead of boiling them - they soaked up so much water, I ended up tripling the flour. Super delicious at the end.
posted by SoundInhabitant at 11:26 PM on May 5


Aziz Ansari’s mom’s chicken korma (as published in the tragically defunct Lucky Peach magazine)

Ottolenghi’s pasta with yogurt, peas and chile (if you can find Aleppo pepper it is worth using it)

Caramel oranges (fantastic with some whipped cream on the side)
posted by exceptinsects at 1:11 AM on May 6


Foccaccia Genovese (link in Italian but google translate does a decent job.)
This is unbelievably tasty, and my Italian wife thinks it's the best recipe for foccaccia we've tried.
posted by multivalent at 4:51 AM on May 6


Deb's lemon potatoes wowed us: Smitten Kitchen Lemon Potatoes
posted by Lookinguppy at 9:04 AM on May 6


After searching for something to get rid of all the lettuce our CSA was giving us that wasn't Another Damn Salad, we have mangled this lettuce soup recipe from Epicurious, which was OK but a bit bland, into something that we find heavenly.

Our version:

Lettuce soup
Serves 4 as an entree, 30-45 minutes to cook

1 package smoked sausage (12-16 oz, depending on brand), sliced into coins
1 cup roughly chopped onions, scallions, and/or shallots
4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
3 tablespoons butter, separated (2Tb, 1Tb)
3/4 teaspoon ground coriander
3/4 cup diced (1/3 inch) peeled potato (or 1 big potato)
8 cups coarsely chopped or torn lettuce leaves including ribs (3/4 lb, or 1 big head)
3 cups low-sodium chicken stock or broth (you really want low-sodium here as the salt magnifies)
1/2-1 cup milk
Juice from 1/2-1 lemon
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Sautee smoked sausage coins in 2 Tb butter in a 4- to 5-quart heavy pot over medium heat until they get some good browning on them. (Adding the butter now is to flavor it with sausage fat, for cooking the onions in. If your sausage gives off a lot of fat, don't use it, reduce it, or don't put it in at this point and spoon off sausage fat before adding butter and cooking onions.) Remove them from pot and reserve until later.

Cook onion mixture and garlic in the butter-and-sausage fat mixture, stirring, until softened, 3 to 5 minutes. Add coriander and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Stir in the potato, lettuce, and chicken stock or broth and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer, covered, until the potato is very tender, about 10 minutes.

Purée soup in batches in a blender (use caution when blending hot liquids) and transfer back into the pot. Bring soup to a simmer, then whisk in remaining tablespoon butter and milk to taste. Add lemon juice to taste, 1/2-1 lemon's worth depending on the size of lemon and your liking of lemon flavor in the soup. Salt and pepper to taste--you may not need any salt if your sausage and chicken broth are salty. Add cooked sausage coins, stir, and heat until everything is warmed through, then serve.

------------

We haven't tried it with fresh sausage yet, nor have we messed about with the butter levels, adding different herbs, etc., but it's a very forgiving recipe that doesn't taste like lettuce at all, which to my mind is a desirable quality in a soup.
posted by telophase at 1:15 PM on May 6 [1 favorite]


Another recipe that's fabulous as-is is Cooking on a Bootstrap's Butterbean Cider Cassoulet. We usually use chicken broth insteadof vegetable broth, because we always have it on hand. I've also made it with wine instead of hard cider, but it's so much better with the cider. Takes most of an afternoon, but the majority is hands-off simmering time.

And this Autumn Carrot and Sweet Potato Soup was delicious this spring, when we had far too many carrots and sweet potatoes delivered to us by the CSA. I turned leftovers into a curry-inspired meal by adding shredded rotisserie chicken and a can of coconut milk, as well as a bunch more curry power and chile powder that I'd sauteed in a bit of oil to bloom the flavors and kill the gritty texture, then served it over rice.
posted by telophase at 1:25 PM on May 6


Apologies for spamming, but it just occurred to me to sort our recipe app by rating, and there's several more recipes that we adore.

NomNom Paleo's bacon deviled egg salad is hands-down the most delicious egg salad I've ever had, even though we use whatever mayo we have on hand--usually Japanese Kewpie mayo.

This Avocado Citrus Salad is amazingly delicious, but a right pain to make if you hate the membranes on citrus as much as I do and try to get rid of as much of it as possible while prepping.

Fall-Apart Roasted Pork Shoulder with Rosemary, Mustard and Garlic was heavenly, and has supplanted Kenji Lopez-Alt's Ultra-Crispy Slow Roasted Pork Shoulder as our favorite.
posted by telophase at 1:36 PM on May 6 [1 favorite]


this recipe is amazing, I make it all the time! Garlic Butter Coconut Creamed Spinach Salmon I serve it with pasta.
posted by foxonisland at 5:19 PM on May 6


Some more recipes.
I love this lasagna from Serious Eats, though my adult children prefer it when I substitute eggplant for the meats, making it vegetarian.

Now as we go towards warmer weather in the Northern Hemisphere, these are some summer recipes:
Duck breast on a bright salad. Cut the fat side of the duck breast into squares or diamonds, and season generously with salt and pepper, rubbing the seasoning in with your hands. Rose pepper is good here.
Roast the duck breast on a hot but not smoking hot cast iron skillet, first fat side down till it is golden brown and a lot of fat has rendered off. Then for a few minutes on the other side. How much depends on your preferences, I like it rosy, just bordering on raw inside. Let the meat rest for 20 minutes, keep the fat in the skillet.
Now make a salad of a crisp type of lettuce and slices of orange and apple. Dress with a mustardy vinaigrette.
If there is a lot of fat in the skillet, you can thinly slice a potato for each breast and gently roast them in the pure duck fat while the meat is resting and you are making the salad. Or you can add enough olive oil to do so. Remember, the fat should be quite salty, so don't season the potatoes before they are done and you can taste. I like to start with raw potatoes, but some prefer parboiled, which are obviously faster to cook.
Finally, slice the duck into thin slices and arrange them prettily on top of the salad. This is very suitable for individual plating.

White fish baked with mustard sauce. Use fillets of plaice or an other flat white fish. The recipe was originally published for witch sole, but any flat fish works. Season lightly with salt and white pepper and roll up the fillets.
Grease an ovenproof dish with butter, and place the rolls in the dish. The fish rolls should just fit.
Now in a bowl, mix equal parts whole (double) cream and thick creme fraiche and the juice of half a lemon. Season with salt and pepper, and add mustard to taste. If you can get it, add finely chopped fresh French tarragon. If you can only find dried tarragon, just add a little, it gets overpowering in larger amounts. Pour the sauce over the fish and bake in a 200 C oven for 25-30 minutes. Serve with rice and a side salad.

Saag Paneer
Madhur Jaffrey’s sesame seed potatoes recipe
Stewed Okra and Tomatoes

Every form of couscous dish and also shakshouka, and tabouleh salad.

Something else I like in the season is very freshly dug up potatoes with steamed pointy cabbage and a nob of butter. If you insist on proteins, you can have a piece of fried fish, like hake, on the side. Or a mackerel "en papillotte".

Summer is also the season for pesto made from scratch, with pasta, potatoes and green beans

And later in summer we can just have a big spread of antipasti, among them caponata, parma ham and melon, scampi, crostini, pickled vegetables, marinated grilled vegetables, baked onions and whatever else is in the fridge.
posted by mumimor at 3:47 AM on May 7 [3 favorites]




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