Cheapest way to embed ~1gb video on website quarterly? Whatʻs best size?
October 26, 2020 10:54 PM   Subscribe

I am building a website for a non-profit. We would like to share the videos of quarterly presentations on different topics (~1 hour). What is the cheapest or free way to do this? What size should the videos be for powerpoint presentations?

I am new to this. Iʻve been optimizing the videos for web with handbrake to get the size down to 1gb. The presentations are normally about 1 hour. What is the minimal size for a powerpoint presentation?

Several people have suggested just putting the video in google drive and embedding from there- but will this result in issues for the user? What are the alternatives? Do we need to just bite the bullet and pay for a vimeo account?
posted by abirdinthehand to Technology (5 answers total)
 
Is there an issue with uploading to Youtube (you can upload videos longer than 15 minutes if your account is verified), perhaps as an unlisted video that you embed? Keeping the video unlisted makes it so that it's not searchable in Youtube but people visiting your site or with the link can still watch it.
posted by katecholamine at 11:32 PM on October 26 [7 favorites]


If your organization subscribes to Microsoft 365, you may already have access to Microsoft Streams. It's better than youtube for things like this imo because it feels more professional. You don't need to worry about filesize for this option either.
posted by dbx at 4:19 AM on October 27


Post to Vimeo and then embed the video on nonprofit's site. Try to avoid YouTube if you can please.
posted by terrapin at 6:10 AM on October 27 [1 favorite]


Google Drive will work fine for most users; it will pop up an in-browser video player unless the user has third-party cookies turned off. A free Drive account has a 15GB storage limit, last I checked.

I'd recommend YouTube or Vimeo, though. These platforms make it easier to embed videos in your site and to market/promote them, and you still have the option to restrict access to certain users (as you would in Drive) if desired. They're also better for accessibility than just dumping an mp4 in Drive. You can add a transcript and/or captions to videos Drive but it's a lot harder than just reviewing/correcting YouTube's auto-captioning. Captions and transcripts are good for everyone, not just for people with limited vision. (For example, I'm sighted but I use captions all the time because I absorb information better by reading, like to ctrl+f on transcripts to find particular information, and prefer to keep the sound low/off so that I don't disturb nearby housemates/coworkers.)
posted by xylothek at 6:58 AM on October 27 [5 favorites]


xylothek is right about the advantages of transcripts / subtitles for many people. Since these are for an association, members may wish to discuss the contents. It is super easy to copy/paste a passage out of a transcript to add to an email or document.
posted by Gotanda at 3:45 PM on October 27


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