Could you help me translate a short sentence into Latin?
December 22, 2017 12:59 PM   Subscribe

I need to translate a simple sentence into Latin as part of a mock Medieval tapestry, but Google Translate is throwing up weird results.

I'm copying the style of the Bayeux Tapestry for an embroidered Christmas gift. It features a kid and a pet frolicking together, looking fairly medieval. The figures are done, and I just need to spend half an hour doing the captions/tituli.

The sentence I want to use is "here [name] and [name] were cute," or something along those lines (cute may not be a good word - Google suggests I use bellus, which I'm guessing has a different connotation than what I'm going for). I've read through the tituli of the Bayeux Tapestry, and things seem to be phrased as e.g. "HIC HAROLD MARE NAVIGAVIT." Ideally my text would be something like "HIC [name] ET [name] [VERB?]," but obviously I don't know a good verb to use, or how to conjugate it.

I don't know Latin, but I know enough to see that the weirdly long and elaborate results I'm getting from Google Translate probably aren't right.
posted by shapes that haunt the dusk to Grab Bag (3 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
Hic [name] et [name] luserunt.

See ludo
posted by Jahaza at 1:13 PM on December 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


hic [kidname] [petname]que iucundi erant

is one possible version (school Latin checked with my girlfriend who enjoys this sort of thing and who did two years of Latin at uni). The -que ending is for 'and', iucundi is for 'cute' as in 'jolly'/'delightful' and erant = were. If kid and dog are both female, use iucundae.

Apparently Catullus might use a particular word to say his girlfriend Lesbia is cute like a little bird, so I may report back on that one after a little hunt.

PS we think this is adorable.
posted by lokta at 1:15 PM on December 22, 2017 [6 favorites]


My Latin is kinda rusty so I don't feel comfortable committing to a translation for you, but I can tell you that Google Translate Latin is really, really bad, since it doesn't have the same body of translations as modern languages to draw from. Don't use it!

I don't think there is an proper Latin word for cute. Bellus just means beautiful. My Latin-English dictionary suggested the diminutive bellulus, but it still means basically the same thing. I think changing the meaning slightly ("they are running? playing?") would give you a better translation.
posted by noxperpetua at 1:16 PM on December 22, 2017 [1 favorite]


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