Looking for online resources about art and art history
October 23, 2017 3:01 PM   Subscribe

What are your favorite places on the Internet for art stuff? I’m interested in long reads as well as shorter bits about art, culture, art history, technique, etc. Graphics are a huge plus, but video is not an option for me.

What I would consider ideal would be something like an expanded version of the Art Book, or some omnibus art history text, annotated and divided into chapters I can read on my tablet at lunchtime.

Also ideal would be something like this blog from one of the Sketchbook Skool folks. I’m interested in seeing people’s work and learning about their process, and also learning about historical context and whose footsteps so-and-so is following when they do this thing or that thing.

Cartoon and graphic novel stuff is also interesting, but I’m not here for comics in the style of Marvel. Also not here for manga. Thank you!!
posted by witchen to Media & Arts (5 answers total) 19 users marked this as a favorite
 
The Met's Heilbrunn Timeline is perfect for digestible art history.
posted by EmilyFlew at 3:28 PM on October 23, 2017 [3 favorites]


I really like the critics at both New York Times and The New Yorker, if you can access them through a library subscription or the like. Also,
Smarthistory
DeviantArt
British Museum’s Teaching History through 100 Objects is fascinating
Sister Wendy is great, but will be a lot of video...I’m on mobile so it’s hard for me to find other links to her right now

I know I could come up with more and better ideas but dealing with an ongoing crisis at the moment...have fun! This is my favorite subject!
posted by Gusaroo at 3:53 PM on October 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


For contemporary art, I'd suggest Colossal, The Jealous Curator, and Hyperallergic.
posted by Wobbuffet at 7:01 PM on October 23, 2017 [1 favorite]


I came to recommend Hyperallergic (especially their weekend link roundups) and the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History, too.

These might be harder to find and work through in a systematic way, but there is a growing collection of digital catalogues that offer deep dives into portions of museums' collections and digital features that are created to accompany or expand upon exhibitions. For example:

- resources focused on special collections in the Harvard Art Museums

- online catalogues on Asian art (and some more online resources) from the Freer & Sackler Galleries

- free digital publications from the Getty, mostly on ancient Mediterranean art, and catalogues from other U.S. museums published through their Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative

- an online resource about Jacob Lawrence's Migration Series, created by The Phillips Collection

None of these are really omnibus art history resources on their own, but you can probably find things about other topics that interest you under "collections" or "publications" on other museum sites.

I also enjoy the British Library's Asian and African Studies blog, which often focuses on art historical topics (mostly manuscripts).
posted by Anita Bath at 12:28 AM on October 24, 2017 [1 favorite]


Google Arts & Culture or AKA Google Cultural Institute, which includes the Google Art Project which are super HD scans of various art works.
posted by DarthDuckie at 8:43 PM on October 25, 2017


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