Can somebody translate "Nevertheless, she persisted" into Latin, please?
February 8, 2017 4:10 PM   Subscribe

And, bonus points for the whole thing: "She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted."

My high school Latin was way back in the last century.
A friend asked for this on Twitter. I think there will uses. Many, many uses.
posted by Gotanda to Writing & Language (12 answers total) 37 users marked this as a favorite
 
tamen ea perseveravit
posted by dis_integration at 4:17 PM on February 8, 2017 [4 favorites]


For the whole thing:

Ea monita est. Explicationem data est. Sed tamen ea perseveravit.

There's probably a better idiom for "to give an explanation" but I can't think of one.
posted by dis_integration at 4:24 PM on February 8, 2017 [2 favorites]


Ooh! One more idea! Ancient / Homeric Greek anyone?
posted by Gotanda at 4:31 PM on February 8, 2017


I'd go with something like: Monita doctaque, perseveravit.
posted by Bromius at 4:58 PM on February 8, 2017 [9 favorites]


ἐπινύσθη. ἐδιδάχθη. οὐ μην ἐλιπάρει. (is Ancient Greek)
posted by Maecenas at 6:51 PM on February 8, 2017 [3 favorites]


So, better to go with idioms over web-based translations?
posted by ZeusHumms at 6:40 AM on February 9, 2017 [1 favorite]


From Mr. Rachael:

"Ea admonebatur. Ea explicationem dabatur. Ea tamen perseverabat.

You have to make the first two verbs passive and put all of them in the imperfect
also, in Latin, to keep repeating "ea," you'd really be hammering the SHE. It'd be more idiomatic to eliminate it at least the second two times, unless you were really trying to call her out.
Which, I guess, McTurtle was."
posted by missrachael at 7:21 AM on February 9, 2017 [1 favorite]


Monita doctaque, perseveravit (She was warned and taught, she persisted) sounds more idiomatic especially because it drops the "est" instead of using the full verb, something pretty common in real Latin. But I'm just a weak Latinist, better at reading than generating. I don't think you can use web translators to get any halfway decent latin.

I still think it should have the "sed tamen" in there for emphasis.
posted by dis_integration at 7:23 AM on February 9, 2017 [1 favorite]


Also I totally think those verbs are passive perfect, not imperfect.
posted by dis_integration at 7:23 AM on February 9, 2017 [1 favorite]


"Of course, now I'm second-guessing my decision to put it all into the imperfect. But if someone feels like it'd be more idiomatic to put the first two into the pluperfect passive, at least now they know what I did. These are things that give translators nightmares.

Someone in that thread is also saying the same thing

Ea admonitus erat. Ea explicationem datus erat. Ea tamen perseveravit.

If you could post that and tell them I like that better, I'd be really, really, really thankful
passive pluperfect, passive pluperfect, active perfect."
posted by missrachael at 7:33 AM on February 9, 2017 [1 favorite]


From a classicist friend:

"Monita docta pertinax.

Monita et docta tamen pertinax mansit.

Latin tends to economy."
posted by late afternoon dreaming hotel at 7:43 AM on February 9, 2017 [3 favorites]


Ea admonitus erat. Ea explicationem datus erat. Ea tamen perseveravit.

Just a note, and apologies for threadsitting, the verb takes the sex of the subject, so "admonita", "data"
posted by dis_integration at 7:46 AM on February 9, 2017


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