Did Camus say this?
September 12, 2016 4:33 AM   Subscribe

I have a Japanese source that contains a quote attributed to Albert Camus. The Japanese reads: 対話のないところには生命はない。 I translate this to, "Where there is no dialogue, there is no life." I've been trying to locate the English translation of the same quote, but none of the variations I've tried turn up anything close. Some Japanese blogs show the quote, extended to add "ところが今日、世界の大部分のところで 対話は論争に置き換えられている。" ("But today, in most of the world, dialogue has been replaced by dispute.") None of these blogs show an original source. Where did Camus say/write this? Or, maybe it's misattributed to him?
posted by mariokrat to Religion & Philosophy (5 answers total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
Did some googling and seems like it is from a speech/essay he wrote called The Artist as Witness of Freedom:The Independent Mind in an Age of Ideologies.
posted by KMoney at 4:49 AM on September 12, 2016 [1 favorite]


Your second quote does indeed exist: "Le dialogue, relation des personnes, a été remplacé par la propagande ou la polémique, qui sont deux sortes de monologue." Albert Camus, L'Homme Révolté, 1951.
Quick translation: "Dialogue, which is a relationship, has been replaced by propaganda and controversy, which are both a type of monologue."

Another similar one: "Nous sommes lucides. Nous avons remplacé le dialogue par le communiqué." Albert Camus, no specific work given.
Translation: "We're lucid. We've replaced dialogue with communiqués." (Last word not plural in the original, but done so that it renders equivalently in English.)

On preview – there you go for your first quote as well.
posted by fraula at 4:52 AM on September 12, 2016 [5 favorites]


Brilliant. Thank you!
posted by mariokrat at 5:32 AM on September 12, 2016


It would be interesting to see what he said in the original French, but unfortunately the essay does not appear to be available online in that language. I've found references to it being in his compiled Essais volume, though, if you really want to track it down.
posted by Johnny Assay at 10:12 AM on September 12, 2016


L'homme révolté is online but only if you're in Canada or another country where copyright is 50 years. It being 70 in France, it won't let me read it, so I can't verify if the first quote precedes the one I quoted there. Should be easy to check if you do a search on it in the text.
posted by fraula at 11:26 AM on September 12, 2016


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