How can I make an aluminum aebleskiver pan work on an induction top?
February 13, 2016 9:19 AM   Subscribe

We've had an induction stovetop for a few years, and it's great, except we had to replace our pots and pans. We only now realized our aluminum aebleskiver pan doesn't work. Crazy idea: fill one of our induction pans with water, and set the aebleskiver pan in that. Would that do something bad to our induction pan or make the aebleskiver's turn out weird? Is there a better solution (besides getting a cast iron aebleskiver pan)?
posted by filthy light thief to Food & Drink (11 answers total)
 
You can buy flat things that go under a non-induction pan that will respond to the induction magnetism and heat up the aluminum pan that is on top of it (like this) but why not just put your pan into a flat induction-friendly frying pan, without water? Should heat it up pretty good...
posted by BillMcMurdo at 9:32 AM on February 13, 2016


you can buy cast iron / steel discs to put between you induction stovetop and your æbleskivepande.
You can buy a disc only of that purpose, or this, which you can use for other things as well..
posted by mumimor at 9:32 AM on February 13, 2016


Using water to couple the heat from an induction-compatible pan into your aebleskiver pan would mean that the aebleskiver pan couldn't ever get hotter than 100°C, which it would probably need to do for nicely browned pancakes.

Leaving the outer pan dry might encourage it to warp, as the contact between outer and inner pans would not be perfect and the outer pan would probably get hotspots in the base.

Why not use the accessory designed for that very job?
posted by flabdablet at 9:32 AM on February 13, 2016 [2 favorites]


Don't use cast iron on an induction cooktop; it can scratch the glass and cause it to malfunction.

I used an induction cooktop for two years with a cheap metal frypan that I didn't care about serving as the intermediary. It worked fine. Don't get a nonstick intermediary. The disc they make for this purpose may or may not heat more evenly.
posted by blnkfrnk at 9:48 AM on February 13, 2016 [1 favorite]


Don't use cast iron on an induction cooktop; it can scratch the glass and cause it to malfunction.

I've used cast iron pans on my induction cooktop daily for years without scratching them. I just don't shove them around on there. Anyway if you're super worried about it you can always put a paper towel between the cast iron and the stovetop--one of the beauties of induction! I personally would go with the cast iron abelskiver pan, since you have to buy something anyway and I bet they'd turn out even better in cast iron than aluminum.
posted by HotToddy at 11:42 AM on February 13, 2016 [3 favorites]


Crazy idea: fill one of our induction pans with water, and set the aebleskiver pan in that. Would that do something bad to our induction pan or make the aebleskiver's turn out weird?

I actually had the same problem and tried this crazy idea a while back. It sort of worked, but the water produces a lot of steam, resulting in somewhat steamy soggy æbleskiver, nor will it get hot enough to really bake them. It is better than nothing in an æbleskiver emergency, but since you're planning ahead, I'd do something else.
posted by zachlipton at 11:55 AM on February 13, 2016


I've should have mentioned I've seen the induction discs, which seemed like a silly thing to buy if I only need it for one item. Right now, I'm leaning towards buying a cast iron aebleskiver pan, and laying down a paper towel if we're concerned about the surface.

And as always, MeFites help clarify why I shouldn't do something (water limiting the heating potential and creating steam - of course!). Thanks everyone!
posted by filthy light thief at 12:33 PM on February 13, 2016 [1 favorite]


I do not have an induction cooktop and therefore don't know what I'm talking about in a specific sense, but if you want the additional surface area contact that water would provide but you want a hotter medium, you could use (cheap vegetable) oil instead.
posted by aimedwander at 5:14 AM on February 14, 2016


and laying down a paper towel if we're concerned about the surface.

This paper towel will burn and fill your room with smoke, and possibly even burst into flames.

To be clear, i know induction cooktops don't get hot. But a cast iron skillet will get at the very least hot enough to blacken the paper.
posted by emptythought at 1:51 PM on February 14, 2016


We had a similar issue and I ended up buying a cheap external electric burner for a similar price to the disk. I figured it might get additional use (thanksgiving or something?).

I think we only used it maybe twice, though...
posted by wyzewoman at 4:25 PM on February 14, 2016


This paper towel will burn and fill your room with smoke, and possibly even burst into flames.

I have done this for literally years, with an induction cooktop and cast iron skillet, every time I cook something that's going to make a spattery mess, and it has never burned.
posted by HotToddy at 12:46 PM on February 17, 2016


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