How to care for the leather upper on Sorel Boots?
January 15, 2016 11:06 AM   Subscribe

I inherited a pair of Sorel Boots (the old kind, from when they were still made in Canada!). The leather upper is dry and I would like to clean/condition them before wearing them out in the snow. Hoping someone can advise on what they need right now in terms of care and then going forward. Photo 1. Photo 2.
posted by mlis to Clothing, Beauty, & Fashion (9 answers total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
Best answer: I'm old-school; I'd use Sno Seal. Not sure how to accomplish the cleaning aspect.
posted by achrise at 11:28 AM on January 15, 2016 [2 favorites]


I use the Chamberlain leather care products on my Saddleback bag and Redwing boots and they come out looking great... the number 1 is a cleaner and conditioner, I'd use that and then the Sno Seal. If they're really dirty, the number 2 is a more thorough cleaner.
posted by Huck500 at 11:35 AM on January 15, 2016


I have a pair of similar boots from L.L. Bean.

I use Lexol Cleaner (you can find smaller containers if you don't need this much) to clean off small stains from rain, snow, and salt. Then I use Obenauf's LP as a conditioner to get the leather flexible and waterproof it a bit. It's a more hard-working conditioner, so it's better for this sort of application instead of, say, for dress shoes. Like most conditioners, it will probably darken the leather, but not greatly.
posted by Skephicles at 12:01 PM on January 15, 2016 [1 favorite]


The old trick with Sno-seal or generic beeswax treatments is to warm the boots in your oven with the oven light on for a few hours before application. You want to apply the wax hot, so it melts into the boot leather.

They should be as clean as possible as well, ideally new, as this will seal in the gunk if they're already dirty. You wax all the leather, fabric or seams.

Sno-seal (or any wax) will darken leather a lot, in my experience.
posted by bonehead at 12:30 PM on January 15, 2016


Mink Oil
posted by humboldt32 at 12:38 PM on January 15, 2016


Best answer: The old trick with Sno-seal or generic beeswax treatments is to warm the boots in your oven with the oven light on for a few hours before application. You want to apply the wax hot, so it melts into the boot leather.

I use a hair dryer. Same effect.
posted by srboisvert at 12:59 PM on January 15, 2016 [2 favorites]


Best answer: I'm a mink oil person for boots like this. I'm not sure I'd even clean them unless there are stains. Warm the boots gently for a little bit, let the mink oil penetrate (or snow seal or whatever) and then wipe off the extra. Do it again if the boots get soaking wet.
posted by jessamyn at 4:00 PM on January 15, 2016 [1 favorite]


Dubbin for initial moisturizing, and then mink oil for weatherproofing once it's reasonably pliable.
posted by kiwano at 9:04 PM on January 15, 2016


Those don't look especially stained or anything. Mink oil 'em and be done.
posted by DaveP at 4:56 AM on January 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


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