So I've made cardamon pepper gin punch, now what?
January 13, 2015 3:58 PM   Subscribe

I tried to see if I could infuse some bland mixing gin (Gordon's ) with more of the aggressive, 'gin-y' spice flavor I like. So I threw in juniper berries, mulling mix (cinnamon, allspice, orange peel, etc) cardamon pods, lemon peel, and peppercorn and let them sit. Now I have a spicy, cardamon-y, assertive, and very bitter tawney gin. What can I mix with this/how can I use it?

I ran a few small test cocktails

Gin and Tonic : way way way too bitter. "Interesting" but feels like it's missing two other mixes.
Gin And Setlzer And Apple Juice : Tastes almost exactly but not quite mulled Apple cider, still astringent but more pleasantly so.
Aviation: strange, not bad, -it cut the sweetness of the violette and added some interesting notes but it altered the color and taste too much.
Martini made with Noilly Pratt Extra Dry : Hmmm ...interesting. Very possible. A bit "thanksgiving novelty themed martini" but not far from being great...maybe a different vermouth.
posted by The Whelk to Food & Drink (21 answers total) 7 users marked this as a favorite
 


Something with Cinzano Bianco maybe? Or perhaps go all the way with the orange and use Aperol, like this kinda-Negroni-alike cocktail?
posted by en forme de poire at 4:05 PM on January 13, 2015


French 75?
posted by juv3nal at 4:06 PM on January 13, 2015 [2 favorites]


Ginger beer? Just saw this cardamom-gin cocktail this morning.
posted by misskaz at 4:12 PM on January 13, 2015 [2 favorites]


Gin fizz? Erring on the side of too many ingredients?
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 4:20 PM on January 13, 2015


More bland gin to dilute it down to a palatable potency?
posted by kaspen at 4:27 PM on January 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


Gin toddy (sample recipe)
Tom Collins
Negroni
Pimms cup (but w your gin instead of pimms)
posted by melissasaurus at 4:38 PM on January 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


What happens if you shake it 2:1:1 with citrus (lemon, maybe) and simple syrup? That's my go-to starting place...
posted by leahwrenn at 4:41 PM on January 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


Fever Tree Sparkling Lemon.

And send some to me, please!
posted by erst at 4:42 PM on January 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


These days my answer to everything is "amaro" (or "amari" if it's a plural question)! Obviously the best answer would be to fly across the country to San Francisco with your gin in a week and a half and we'll figure out something! But failing that, I have two suggestions:
1) use a recipe that calls for a more bitter amaro (like Amaro Nonino or Campari), but use something less bitter, (like Amaro Ciociaro, which is totally delicious and you should get it if you don't have it).
2) add a few drops of lemon or lime juice to balance the bitter. And you'll probably want a little bit of sweetness to balance that

Here's the first thing I'd try:

1.5 oz funny gin
.5 oz Amaro Ciociaro
.25 oz Grand Marnier
a few drops of various bitterses
juice from one segment of a Rangpur lime (or whatever citrus is handy)

Shake, strain, serve in a coupe
posted by aubilenon at 4:43 PM on January 13, 2015 [3 favorites]


Cranberry shrub. Ginger syrup. Mango nectar.

Not necessarily all together.

Possibly a gin fizz?
posted by hydrobatidae at 5:09 PM on January 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


Sweet vermouth, or equal parts sweet and dry, and flavor with orange wedge. You've made yourself a sort of premixed Negroni, one of the all time great bitter cocktails.

Alternately, you might consider mixing with ginger ale and a lime wedge. The ginger ale should complement the bitterness without removing it completely and match well with the cardomon.

Coco recommends trying it in a mix with grand marnier.
posted by maxsparber at 6:20 PM on January 13, 2015 [3 favorites]


I think a flip might work - the egg foam should take the edge off.
posted by janell at 8:16 PM on January 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


Cardamom is a natural friend of citrus, especially sweet citrus.

But even better would be cardamom plus almond, which will be very classically Scandinavian. So orgeat syrup or an almond liqueur such as amaretto would go very well with your gin.

I'd recommend going all in and combining all three flavors: cardamom, orange, and almond in a drink like a modified White Lady (which you could call a Swedish Lady):

-3 parts cardamom-forward gin
-1 part amaretto
-1 part fresh orange juice
-1/4 part fresh lemon juice

Shake over ice, strain, and serve neat.
posted by yellowcandy at 8:25 PM on January 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


Raw egg whites.
posted by oceanjesse at 9:55 PM on January 13, 2015


I would go with a teaspoon of sugar and some fizzy lemonade and a tall glass with a ton of ice.

I would call it 'July'.
posted by A Terrible Llama at 1:50 AM on January 14, 2015


Try it with Grenardine (for colour) and simple syrup (to cut the bitter flavour) and freshly squeezed orange juice (to carry the high notes of the spice) over a glacier of ice in a highball. Big chunks of ice, not snowflakes. No straw.
posted by evil_esto at 2:40 AM on January 14, 2015


Negroni, definitely.
Try it with blueberry shrub + lemon juice. I find blueberries and cardamom to be a nice pairing, and the gin/blueberry/lemon thing has worked well with other gins for me.
posted by Maecenas at 7:31 AM on January 14, 2015


If it's really bitter/harsh, try mixing it with something sweet to soften the edges, or sweet+tart diluted with club soda (fizz-type tall drinks), or sparkling wine. Off the top of my head, St. Germain, Cassis, sweet vermouth and similar stuff like Dubonnet Rouge, and ruby port come to mind. You may want to do a search for cocktails at the usual places (I like Kindred Cocktails, Diffords Guide, obsessive blogs like Cocktail Virgin/Slut, and Small Screen Network's various bartender video blogs, among others) that use Cardamaro amaro or cardamom and/or juniper syrup (or maybe things that use oude genever-style gins) and alter to fit what you've got too. Part of me wonders if mixing it in (usually whiskey-based) drinks that have stuff like Cherry Heering or Maurin Quina might help (or make things worse...).

Another option is to find a soda that's brawny but complementary enough and just combine. One of my favorite gin drinks for ages was simply Fentiman's Rose Lemonade Soda and very herbal gin. There are lots of sweet clean tasting cucumber and/or melon sodas now too.

And actually, silver fizzes, with egg white, might work because egg white with gin tends to make things silky and somehow sweeter tasting to me.

Digging around my "cocktails I've made and enjoyed a lot" file, the following might work with some tweaking/substitutions to taste (ignore the spec spirit recommendations; those are just cut and pasted from my personal reference):

El Maestro (KindredCocktails.com)
2 slices cucumber
1 ½ oz sherry
½ oz Old Tom gin
½ oz Cynar
½ oz St. Germain
2 dashes celery bitters (Bittermens, Fee Brothers)
Stir with ice and strain into an ice-filled tall glass. Garnish with cucumber wheel.

Bitter End (Cocktail Virgin via KindredCocktails.com) (this one seems like if you took out what's bitter and strong and left what's tart and fruity it might work, with tweaking)
1 ½ oz gin
½ oz Cynar
½ oz Cointreau triplesec
2 dashes grapefruit bitters (Fee Brothers)
¾ oz grapefruit juice
Shake with ice and strain into an ice-filled rocks glass.

La Bicyclette (stgermaincocktails.wordpress.com by Jamie Boudreau)
1 ½ oz gin (Plymouth)
¾ oz sweet vermouth
¼ oz St. Germain
2 dashes peach bitters
Stir with ice and strain into a chilled coupe. Garnish with lemon twist.

Ghost Hardware
2 wheels cucumber (not muddled)
1 heavy pinch salt
1 ½ oz gin (Bluecoat)
¾ oz Aperol
¼ oz white creme de cacao (Marie Brizard)
2 to 3 dashes Angostura Bitters
¾ oz lemon juice
½ oz 2:1 demerara syrup
Muddle cucumber with salt, add remaining ingredients and shake with ice and finely strain into a chilled coupe.

Can-Can Martini (stgermaincocktails.wordpress.com by Jamie Boudreau)
High-kicking, cartwheels and petticoats recommended, but purely optional.
2 oz gin or vodka
½ to 1 oz St. Germain
¼ oz dry vermouth or dry white wine
Shake with ice and finely strain into a chilled coupe. Garnish with lemon or orange twist.

East Side Elder (stgermaincocktails.wordpress.com by Jamie Boudreau)
To alter it to an East Side Elder Fizz, use an ice-filled tall glass and top with club soda.
1 pinch fresh mint
2 pieces cucumber
2 oz gin
1 oz St. Germain
¾ oz lime juice
Muddle mint and cucumber at base of shaker, add remaining ingredients, shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe. Garnish with cucumber wheel and mint leaf.

Elderflower Collins
1 oz gin
1 ½ oz St. Germain
½ oz lemon juice
club soda
Shake gin, St. Germain, and lemon juice and strain into an ice-filled tall glass. Top with soda. Garnish with lemon wedge or slice.

Venus and Cupid (PDT via KindredCocktails.com)
A reddish, brick-y brown with the usual foamy spiced head. This is bizarrely chocolatey and rich like almost all spiced egg drinks; one wonders where the heck the choco-flavor comes from. There’s twinges of bitterness, earthy herbal rootiness from the Punt e Mes and it’s nice indeed, like edgier darker artisanal chocolate bars. Yeah, it kinda has an earthy soil thing going on a bit like good chocolate does. And the coolness of the cardamom is great with the medicinal coolness of the Punt e Mes. There’s some smokiness from the tequila too. This is really nice stuff. One wonders where the heck the aperol and grapefruit goes, but there is upon further examination a tinge of tartness and grapefruit; it’s faint but there, nicely, smoothing out the bitterness. Not sure what time of year to stick this to though, as its ingredients are more warm weather but the result seems cool weather rich and dark.
1 pod green cardamom
1 ½ oz reposado tequila
¾ oz Aperol
¾ oz Punt e Mes
½ oz grapefruit juice
1 egg white
Muddle cardamom, add remaining ingredients, dry shake, shake vigorously with ice, and double strain into a chilled coupe. Garnish with freshly grated cinnamon.

French Berry (stgermaincocktails.wordpress.com by Jamie Boudreau)
Created by Raphael Reyes.
2 whole strawberries
¾ oz lime juice
½ oz simple syrup
1 ½ oz gin (Plymouth)
1 oz St. Germain
Rinse chilled coupe with absinthe and rub with fresh rosemary. Muddle strawberries, lime juice, and syrup in the base of shaker, add gin and St. Germain and shake with ice and strain into chilled coupe rinsed with absinthe and rubbed with fresh rosemary.

Ginnifer Flowers
2 oz gin (Plymouth)
1 oz St. Germain
½ oz lemon juice
½ oz simple syrup
Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with edible flower.

Gin Sling (The Craft of the Cocktail by Dale DeGroff 121)
1 ½ oz gin
1 oz sweet vermouth
1 dash Angostura Bitters
¾ oz lemon juice
1 oz simple syrup
club soda
Shake gin, sweet vermouth, bitters, lemon juice, and simple syrup with ice and strain into an ice-filled tall glass. Top with club soda. Garnish with lemon spiral as in a Horse’s Neck.

The Gypsy (stgermaincocktails.wordpress.com by Jamie Boudreau) (I'd take out the chartreuse at least)
Do not resist urge to shed your hat and gloves. Madame Rose Lee would expect nothing less.
1½ oz gin
¾ oz St. Germain
½ oz green Chartreuse
½ oz lime juice
Shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe. Garnish with thinly sliced lime wheel.

St. Germain Gin and Tonic (Scottish Re-Deux) (stgermaincocktails.wordpress.com by Jamie Boudreau)
1 ½ oz gin (Hendrick’s)
¾ oz St. Germain
tonic water
Build gin and St. Germain in a chilled tall glass. Top with tonic and lightly stir. Garnish with lime wedge.

Vieux Mot (stgermaincocktails.wordpress.com by Jamie Boudreau)
1½ oz gin (Plymouth)
¾ oz St. Germain
¾ oz lemon juice
¼ oz simple syrup
Shake vigorously with ice and strain into a chilled coupe.

Italian Greyhound
1 to 2 oz gin (optional)
1 to 2 splashes Aperol
4 oz grapefruit juice
rosemary simple syrup or sugar
Rim a large cocktail or rocks glass with fresh grapefruit and rosemary sugar. Fill glass with crushed ice, build gin and grapefruit juice, and top with Aperol. Swirl or stir gently.

Ophelia
1 ½ oz gin
¾ oz lemon juice
¾ oz infused simple syrup (rhubarb, rosemary, or both)
2 sprigs fresh rosemary
club soda (optional)
Optionally muddle gin and rosemary sprigs if using. Add lemon juice and infused syrup, shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe or an ice-filled tall glass. If using an ice-filled tall glass, top with club soda. Garnish with rosemary sprig first rubbed around rim.

Palm Beach Special (Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails by Ted Haigh 222) (since grapefruit is bitter and you say your gin's way too bitter, I'd use something else like orange juice maybe)
2 ½ oz gin (Plymouth)
½ oz sweet vermouth
¾ oz grapefruit juice
Shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe.

Seattle Southside (The Bartender’s Gin Compendium by Gaz Regan 327)
2 oz gin (Citadelle)
2 oz pear liqueur (Mathilde Poire)
1 oz lemon juice
Shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe. Garnish with mint sprig.

Southside (The PDT Cocktail Book by Jim Meehan 244)
Pretty much just a gin sour pepped up with fresh mint, but something about it just hits the spot. It's so refreshing and clean, like what I want when I try drinking a classic daiquiri or margarita but usually find wanting. It's going to be a regular when summer heat hits I think.
2 oz gin (Plymouth)
3/4 oz lemon juice
3/4 oz simple syrup
4 leaves fresh mint
Muddle mint with syrup. Add remaining ingredients and shake with ice and finely strain into a chilled coupe.

Sorella Negroni
1 oz gin
1 oz Aperol
½ oz sweet vermouth (Punt e Mes)
½ oz dry vermouth
2 dashes orange bitters
Shake or stir with ice until thoroughly chilled and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Wisecrack Fizz (DiffordsGuide.com)
1 ½ oz pisco (Macchu)
1 oz St. Germain
1 oz grapefruit juice
½ oz lemon juice
club soda
Shake pisco, St. Germain, grapefruit juice, and lemon juice with ice and strain into a chilled ice-filled tall glass. Top with soda and garnish with lemon twist. Serve with straws.

Patio
1 ½ oz vodka
½ Chambord
3 oz lemonade
Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with lime wedge or lemon twist.

Vesper (adapted from Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails by Ted Haigh 276) (the addition of vodka might smooth things out, and then instead of Cocchi if things are already very herbal/spiced something more neutral, like sparkling wine and a touch of syrup even)
Shockingly good variation on a dry martini. The vodka indeed smooths out the vast amount of gin, and the Cocchi lends that wonderful herbal something-something. Super refreshing and interesting. One just needs to be careful, egads.
3 oz gin (London Dry, preferably 90 proof, Tanqueray)
1 oz vodka (preferably 100 proof, Stolichnaya)
1/2 oz Cocchi Americano (Lillet Blanc will do in a pinch)
Shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe. Garnish with expressed lemon twist.

Old Flame (Adapted) (The PDT Cocktail Book by Jim Meehan 197)
As usual, the egg smooths out the burn and acidity nicely. Faint licorice comes in later with a lot of other awesome perfectly blended notes. Love it. A pretty pale white-green too. Would make an awesome spring after-dark drink.
2 oz gin (Plymouth)
3/4 oz lemon juice
3/4 oz simple syrup
1 egg white
Dry shake then shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe. Float 1/4 oz green Chartreuse as garnish.

Sweet Grass
1 ½ oz gin (Hendrick’s)
1 oz Pimm’s 1
½ oz coconut rum
ginger ale
Stir gin, Pimm’s, and rum in an ice-filled rocks glass and top with ginger ale. Garnish with cucumber.

Ramos Fizz
2 teaspoons lime juice
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 Tablespoon superfine sugar (I used homemade rich simple syrup instead)
1 1/2 oz gin (Old Tom)
1 oz cream
1/4 teaspoon orange flower water
1 egg white
1 oz club soda
In a shaker stir lime juice, lemon juice, and sugar (or syrup) to dissolve. Add gin, cream, orange flower water, and egg white. Shake vigorously for 10 seconds. Add 2 cups ice and shake vigorously for about 45 seconds more. Strain into a chilled rocks glass and top with club soda.
posted by ifjuly at 10:21 AM on January 14, 2015 [1 favorite]


Martinez, where the sweet vermouth will balance the bitterness, or a gimlet, where the citrus should also help give the bitterness depth.
posted by klangklangston at 1:12 PM on January 15, 2015


So I mixed it up with lemonade, ginger ale and red sweet vermouth. It got very mild and pleasantly bitter, but I think I buried some of the favors, maybe add less of something. Hmm.
posted by The Whelk at 5:09 PM on January 15, 2015


« Older What would happen if you transplanted an animal's...   |   temporary health insurance via health benefit... Newer »
This thread is closed to new comments.