Look ma, no walls!
September 5, 2013 11:35 AM   Subscribe

Where can I find more pictures of houses "without" walls like the ones in this link? Also, it would be awesome if I could get some names of architects that share a similar style.
posted by pakoothefakoo to Home & Garden (9 answers total) 3 users marked this as a favorite
 
The prototype for this style is the Farnsworth House, by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.
posted by mr_roboto at 11:49 AM on September 5, 2013 [2 favorites]


Some good key phrases:

Open Floorplan
Flex Space
posted by carsonb at 12:12 PM on September 5, 2013


Quite a while ago, the MoMA in New York had an exhibition of places like this, called "The Un-Private House". Projects included are here.
posted by LionIndex at 12:13 PM on September 5, 2013 [1 favorite]


The prototype for this style is the Farnsworth House, by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

Well, Maison Domino came earlier, but it was more theoretical (instead of built) and came out of an exhibition that Mies was a part of. Corb and some others were doing pretty open-plan modern stuff in Europe for quite a while before Mies moved to Illinois. Even Mies' Barcelona Pavilion is from the 20s.
posted by LionIndex at 12:20 PM on September 5, 2013


Also Phillip Johnson's Glass House.
posted by hot soup at 1:21 PM on September 5, 2013


Quite a while ago, the MoMA in New York had an exhibition of places like this, called "The Un-Private House".

The interesting thing about this style is that it really isn't un-private. (at least as Van Der Rohe did it) All the areas you expect to be private are still private. It just blurs the line between semi-private outside and semi-private inside. But those are areas that were public anyway- the areas where you would entertain guests. (Just like the downstairs versus upstairs in traditional large homes.) Site selection and landscaping would be used to obscure those areas from the public way.

Van Der Rohe's work looks cold and rigid, but as for usability and comfort, they are great buildings. You feel much more connected to the outside world. When you are inside, you see the places you should go (like bathrooms and elevator banks), and you have to search to find the places you aren't meant to go (like broom closets and loading docks.)

Anyway, I believe it is called the International Style.
posted by gjc at 3:06 PM on September 5, 2013 [1 favorite]


Two of the houses I loved when I saw that MOMA exhibit back in the stone age were 64 Wakefield and the Curtain Wall House.
posted by brina at 4:02 PM on September 5, 2013


Good stuff. Thanks y'all!
posted by pakoothefakoo at 5:10 PM on September 5, 2013


you might check darkroastedblend particularly their 'archetechture' and 'futurism' categories...lots of facinating photo essays on that site. beware: time sink. (also thanks for posting this...great visual reference for a design project i'm working on...futurist Jetsons houses ruined by hundreds of years in a swamp...and haunted)
posted by sexyrobot at 7:41 PM on September 5, 2013


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