Finding Notary NYC...level: Difficult
May 25, 2013 8:35 AM   Subscribe

Hi, I am looking for a notary in NYC. Yes I have seen this question.

No, my workplace doesn't have this sort of service. Yes, I went to the bank, they said they "cannot notarized that something is a true and like copy of the original". Yes, I work normal hours so ideally wanted to do it this weekend but will take time off work (which means the whole day since I work in the middle of nowhere) if necessary. Ideally in Union Square/East Village area but really I am willing to go anywhere. Please help me!

TL:DR- I need a notary to certify documents are copies of originals. Willing to travel anywhere in NYC area. Thanks.
posted by bquarters to Law & Government (15 answers total)
 
Are the copies already made, or would you let the notary make the copies?

I've gotten signature notarized at the UPS Store, so you could try there, but I don't know if they would do this.
posted by rustcellar at 8:46 AM on May 25, 2013


I took both in, and in my hometown I used to go to a lawyer's office (I think it cost $10 and I could just walk in because he was extremely not busy and it was a tiny office.) Not sure what NYC equivalent is or why this is seeming to be so difficult for me!
posted by bquarters at 8:54 AM on May 25, 2013


Seconding UPS store - they should be able to do this for you and there are several in the NYC area including this one which is also open on Sunday and Monday this holiday weekend.
posted by nightwood at 9:03 AM on May 25, 2013


They're more common in the outer boroughs I think but you might also stick your head into one of those storefronts for full service accountant-real estate-attorney offices (or just a real estate broker). If they can't do it they may be able to recommend someone since they may need the service in their own business.
posted by rustcellar at 9:05 AM on May 25, 2013 [4 favorites]


Looking a little close, this UPS Store on 8th might be closer. They also have notary services - might be worth a call to see if they can do exactly what you need.
posted by nightwood at 9:08 AM on May 25, 2013


Government offices (city hall/town hall/courts), law firms, real estate agencies, pharmacies, insurance agencies, sometimes libraries, ups store, kinkos/fedex store. The cost cannot exceed $2.

As to the entire they said they "cannot notarized that something is a true and like copy of the original" thing, whether it is a copy or not should not matter. You can sign a document and they can notarize your signature on it when you sign in front of them and show ID. This is the predominant use of notaries.

However, your I need a notary to certify documents are copies of originals statement is a bit of an issue:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notary_public_(New_York)
Notaries have no other powers: notably (as emphasized by official publications) they may not certify copies of documents (for instance, "I hereby certify that this is a true and correct copy...," is beyond the authority of a New York State notary). However, a notary may sign a form of affidavit on a copy where the document's custodian signs and swears to the authenticity of the document (usually a government issued picture ID). This can suffice as a "notarized copy" in most instances, but is not a certified copy.
posted by Brian Puccio at 9:12 AM on May 25, 2013 [2 favorites]


Strange, but we get all of our stuff notarized at Metro Art & Frame. The owner is a notary, and keeps hours on weekends and evenings. I would call ahead to see when he's there, and explain your situation.
posted by kimdog at 9:12 AM on May 25, 2013


Here's a mobile notary service. Yelp has other recommendations too.
posted by acidic at 9:13 AM on May 25, 2013


Normally things that are being certified as a true copy of the original, are certified as such by whoever has custody of the original (and who thus made the copy.) Birth/death/etc. certificates, for instance - the certification is by the state or local agency.

If it's your original (certifying that this here copy is in fact a copy of this thing I made) then you sign a statement to that effect, and the notarization is that you were the person who signed it (you sign it in front of them, and they check your ID.)

But anyway, any lawyer can notarize stuff for you, etc.; the answers above for finding a notary are more than sufficient.
posted by SMPA at 9:19 AM on May 25, 2013 [1 favorite]


Your Neighborhood Office on Bleecker has a notory every day. UPS/mailbox ETC stores have them too, but possibly only a few days a week.
posted by snickerdoodle at 9:39 AM on May 25, 2013 [2 favorites]



As to the entire they said they "cannot notarized (sic, sorry for typo) that something is a true and like copy of the original" thing, whether it is a copy or not should not matter. You can sign a document and they can notarize your signature on it when you sign in front of them and show ID. This is the predominant use of notaries.

However, your I need a notary to certify documents are copies of originals statement is a bit of an issue:


Exactly, when the bank person said "I can't do this" I was sort of thinking "well, what DO you do as a notary then?" Again, I think it has something to do with American literalness of question answering or something to that effect. Or my own poor communication skills. Or both.

I am going to try the mobile notary, even though I am worried, am going to get overcharged and find the whole idea a bit weird. Thanks for your responses!
posted by bquarters at 9:39 AM on May 25, 2013


Actually will try above mentioned "Your Neighborhood Office" first, thanks again. Much lower price, very nice on phone and seems to fit my needs perfectly. Thank you.
posted by bquarters at 9:51 AM on May 25, 2013


I was a NYS notary. Brian Puccio is right. A notary watches a signature, and attests that the signature was made. Everything else is extraneous (including confirming the identity of the signer, if my licensing booklet was right). You could sign "Abe Lincoln" on a piece of tree bark and I would have notarized it. Luckily I never had to.
posted by mahorn at 10:35 AM on May 25, 2013


In some states, notaries can certify copies of documents. In NYS, they cannot. They can, however, certify your signature on an affidavit in which you swear that the document is a true and accurate copy ("Copy certification by document custodian"). This may not suffice for your purposes, and you will probably have to draft it yourself (or find one online).

Your bank should be able to notarize this type of document. A number of other places like check cashing, tax prep, etc may have notaries also, though Saturday availability is questionable. Walk around your neighborhood and you'll probably see a few. Or look on Yelp.

Also, unless using a travelling notary (who can bill for travel cost), by law notaries can only charge $2 to notarize a document.
posted by melissasaurus at 11:13 AM on May 25, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah, your problem is not "how do I find a notary" but you need to resolve the issue of the "True and like copy".
posted by corb at 2:44 PM on May 25, 2013


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