Looking for a free hit counter for a business site
June 28, 2005 2:00 PM   Subscribe

What is the best (and free'est) hit counter? I would like to be able to make it invisible to the surfer and have it collect statistics. Sitemeter used to be great but they are not around anymore it seems. They had statistics available so you could see who was at your site and which pages they were at, etc. Don't know how to do coding so I have no backend database or cgi, etc. experience...unless it is super easy to figure out or a stand alone java applet.
posted by SparkyPine to Computers & Internet (13 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite
 
Sitemeter

Works for me.
posted by deborah at 2:06 PM on June 28, 2005


Sitemeter used to be great but they are not around anymore it seems.

Sitemeter's still around.
posted by pardonyou? at 2:07 PM on June 28, 2005


yeah, info on paying for an invisible counter is here. about $6 a month.
posted by jetskiaccidents at 2:11 PM on June 28, 2005


I used to use these guys.

Not invisible, but since it's code you copy and paste it doesn't take long to go in and change the image height and width to a single px.
posted by Kellydamnit at 2:17 PM on June 28, 2005


Well, the free'est and most invisible is just analyzing your server logs:

If your server log is in file "log", then on a linux system or on Windows with cygwin installed
wc log 
tells you total hits on your site
uniq log | wc 
tells you total unique computers (IPs) hitting your site, and
grep "/path/to/some.special.page.html" | uniq | wc 
tells you total hits on some particular page of your site.


Or for a more comprehensive breakdown, with graphs and charts, you can run webalizer or some other free tool against your log file.

Both these solutions are better than hit counters, because lots of people (not to mention bots) use filtering proxies (Proxomitron, AdSubtract, CookieCop, etc.) to defeat hit counters (whether the hit counter uses javascript or not), and because analyzing server logs shows you hits to all portions of your site, not just those that have hitcounters installed (as for instance, direct links to downloadable files you host on your site).
posted by orthogonality at 2:22 PM on June 28, 2005


I love Statcounter. The default is a visible counter, but when you configure your counter you can choose an invisible option.
posted by MsMolly at 2:22 PM on June 28, 2005


Another vote for Statcounter.
posted by fixedgear at 2:32 PM on June 28, 2005


BBClone is a pretty full featured hit counter. It doesn't use a database, but it does use php. You basically just put it in a folder in your web tree, stick the provided php code to the top of the page you want tracked, and it sits back and collects data.
posted by mnology at 2:36 PM on June 28, 2005


Statcounter is great.
posted by evariste at 5:19 PM on June 28, 2005


Sitemeter also has an option to hide statistics for prying eyes - in the free version.

Statcounter does not work for high traffic sites, you need to upgrade.
posted by webmeta at 9:16 PM on June 28, 2005


orthogonality writes "Both these solutions are better than hit counters, because lots of people (not to mention bots) use filtering proxies (Proxomitron, AdSubtract, CookieCop, etc.) to defeat hit counters"

For instance, it turns out that I block all connections to Sitemeter, so sitemeter counters don't count my visits. I don't remember when I added the block, or if it's a default block, I just know that I have to override it to go to sitemeter.com
posted by orthogonality at 10:58 PM on June 28, 2005


I use eXTReMe Tracker and have been happy with it, but I'm tempted to try out Statcounter since it gets such enthusiastic recommendations.
posted by languagehat at 7:19 AM on June 29, 2005


I'm not currently using it, but I used the free version of LogITPro for quite awhile and thought it was swell. Looks like a limited version is still free.
posted by deliriouscool at 9:59 AM on June 29, 2005


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